You Are What You Write Webinar

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  • YOU MUST PRESENT A UNIQUE AND COMPELLING REASON FOR A MEMBER TO PAY ATTENTION TO YOU. – A REASON THAT STANDS OUT IN A CROWD OF THE COMPETITION. So your marketing goal is to attract Chuck ’ s attention. Chuck is a member of that busy, hectic demographic you want to target. he gets hundreds of messages a day from various organizations and you want to get his attention -- Writing is a tool to help you market to Chuck. It ’ s not the only tool, but is can be a very powerful one. This all represents a change in the way you may have thought about communicating even two years ago. YOU MUST PRESENT A UNIQUE AND COMPELLING REASON FOR A MEMBER TO PAY ATTENTION TO YOU. – A REASON THAT STANDS OUT IN A CRAOW OF THE COMPETITION. The concept is most frequently referred to as your unique selling proposition (USP).
  • There ’ s more than one audience segment - so once determine the topic, then you look at audiences, then you determine how to deliver the message
  • Writing is more than spewing out the facts. The info on the event, the class. It’s about selling the member on doing what you want them to do. Before we investigate more abot that – let’s assume you are sitting at the dinner table… What are you thinkin?
  • Writing is more than spewing out facts – it is organizing those facts and showing their meaning. Next slide
  • And that ’ s the same thing Jane is thinking when she gets that flyer in the mail. She ’ s wondering what ’ s in it for her.
  • EVERY piece of communication should answer this question. What’s in it for me? Why should I: read, call, log in, buy, respond? So knowing what a BENEFIT IS (and isn’t) is important
  • What was once a turn-of-the-20th-century wooden toll bridge is now a state-of-the-art gateway into Midtown Palm Beach and like the town, Royal Park Bridge, the island ’s middle bridge, turns 100 in 2011. The bridge ’s history is punctuated by triumph and one long-ago disaster. Its first incarnation in 1911 came thanks to noteworthy Palm Beach pioneer Elisha Newton “Cap” Dimick, Palm Beach’s first mayor whose civic and business involvements were extensive. In 1908, Dimick and a few business partners formed the Palm Beach Improvement Company and bought approximately 160 then-jungly lake-to-ocean acres in what is now the center of town. They built 4.5 miles of roads for their Royal Park Addition subdivision — dubbed “Millionaire’s Playground” and outfitted with two 24-seat vehicles for tours — and in 1911 built the Royal Park Bridge. The toll for the privately operated wooden trestle bridge was a quarter per vehicle, plus a nickel for each additional passenger. The bridge was sold to the county in 1920 and longtime toll-taker M.B. Curling half-joked he was “sold out” of his job. In December 1921, as final touches on a then-new nine-arch masonry Royal Park Bridge were under way, a pier near the Palm Beach end gave way and, subsequently, more collapsed. Remarkably, laborers and others escaped serious injury. The bridge was rebuilt and opened to traffic in 1924. In 1959, the swing span was removed, a lift-opening was installed and the bridge was widened. Since then, the Royal Park Bridge has undergone various construction and renovation projects. The most recent, a new $50-plus-million bridge, was completed in 2004 and hailed as a crowning achievement.
  • Non-profit example You get to do this one
  • “ Always be closing ” is often referred to as the “ ABCs of selling ” . “ Informing ” , “ Educating ” , and “ Entertaining ” are early steps of the sales and marketing process. Remember to connect the so what? What ’ s in it for the member? Why should they care? Here ’ s a business example about a cardboard business to help make the point to think like a member instead of the Association Executive: Never assume a prospect will know what to do next. You must tell them. Spell it out clearly what you want them to do next. Pick up the phone and call Complete the order form Sign up for the seminar
  • Non-profit example You get to do this one
  • People expect business writing to have a purpose. If step 1 is knowing your audience, step 2 says – what’s your goal?
  • I’d like to introduce a couple of colleagues in this marketing business They’ve compiled a list of the common mistakes marketers make when they are writing copy.
  • “ Action words” or “power verbs” get touted a lot by copywriters the world over as the ultimate tool for getting prospects to buy. But our research suggests that focusing on the action that you want your visitors to take hurts conversion. It’s not about the action itself, it’s about the value they’re going to get as a result of taking that action. Getting that right in your CTA can give you dramatic lifts with very little effort.
  • Ok, this is an extreme example, but its an actual real estate association flier The words they ’ ve chosen, the colors, the images, and the overall message. Says something about this association
  • Ok, this is an extreme example, but its an actual real estate association flier The words they ’ ve chosen, the colors, the images, and the overall message. Says something about this association
  • American Press institute – average person comprehends 80% of the message when sentences are 14 words or less; 100% at 6 words per sentences
  • An unclear eye-path in your copy that doesn ’ t match the thought sequence in your reader almost always hurts conversion.
  • Frequently Asked Questions What is AttentionWizard? AttentionWizard is a revolutionary approach to visualizing attention on a landing page. It can predict where the human eye will move during the first few seconds on a page, and where the brains attention will focus. No human subjects are required and it works with screen-grabs of actual pages or in-progress design mock-ups. How does it work? AttentionWizard uses advanced software algorithms to simulate visual perception and attention. It is a combination of "bottom-up" visual system building blocks and "top-down" higher cognitive processes such as object recognition. Bottom-up features considered include: color differences, contrast , density, brightness and intensity, edges and intersections, length and width, curves and line orientations. Top-down algorithms recognize larger letters and text, skin texture, and human faces. What is an "attention heatmap"? An attention heatmap is a combination of two elements: eye-gazing, and predicted attention. Eye-gazing simulates the sequence of extremely rapid and involuntary eye movements ("saccades") that happen as your eye scans a scene. This is overlaid on a heatmap of the attention represented by different colors which predicts where the brain will focus. Hotter areas indicate a more intense focus, while cooler areas show a lower level of awareness and importance. How can it be used? AttentionWizard can be used to refine landing page designs for existing or new pages, and to improve conversion rates. It can identify which page elements are being looked at and which are being ignored. This allows the designer to focus attention on the correct parts of the page and increase the likelihood of conversion. Attention heatmaps can be created several times during the design or re-design process to ensure that the refinements are having the intended effect. A "busy" eye-gaze path and scattered heatmap with many hotspots is usually an indication that visual priorities of the page are not clear, and will likely result in confusion and a higher bounce rate for your landing page. Relatively simple eye gaze paths and a small number of clear hot spots (centered on the desired conversion-related areas) are a good indication that the page will be more effective. How is it different from eye tracking and mouse tracking? Eye tracking and mouse tracking are much more time consuming, expensive, and take a long time to get results. Eye tracking studies require human subjects to be recruited and to be shown the landing page in a controlled environment involving specialized hardware. Mouse tracking studies require adding special code to the landing page and waiting for many visitors to interact with it in order to produce aggregated "heatmaps" from multiple people. AttentionWizard uses computer simulation and models to replace the need for human subjects interacting with your page. The results are available instantly and can be run on any uploaded image (a "live" page screenshot or a design mock-up of a new page). What are its accuracy and limitations? AttentionWizard results are 75%+ correlated with eye tracking and mouse tracking approaches. The algorithm is optimized for fast computation. Slightly higher accuracy can be achieved by more compute-intensive algorithms, but these can take several hours to produce a result. AttentionWizard heatmaps also tend to produce more focused hotspots because they are designed to simulate where the brain's awareness is highest. By contrast, eye tracking and mouse tracking images tend to have more ghost-like halos that are simply the result of movements between the actual points of interest or visual fixation. AttentionWizard is not a substitute for landing page testing. It cannot evaluate the effectiveness of your sales copy, the strength of your brand or value proposition, the pricing of your product or service, the professionalism of your landing page design, or the Web visitor's psychological reactions to the specific color scheme you have chosen. But it can help you to improve the quality of your landing page, to make sure that the call-to-action is clear, and to make sure that other visual elements do not distract from the stated conversion goals. - Page
  • Heavy text without any highlighting, bullets, or bold text to pull the eye through the page is a great example of making this mistake. Let’s look at an actual association example.
  • WHITE SPACE and GRAPHICS
  • WHITE SPACE and GRAPHICS
  • If you thought you were safe on that last one, try this one on for size. Again, depending on where the reader is in their thought process, saying too little is just as bad as saying too much. Your reader needs exactly the right amount of copy to get them to make the decision on the page. Sometimes that takes 30 pages of long copy, sometimes it takes a few words. There are actually the same kind of experiments that found that we weren’t giving the visitor enough information to make a decision. Because they were in a different place in the thought process, they needed longer copy.
  • You know this story - If you are, or ever have been married, you know exactly how saying too much hurts conversion. Assuming conversion means getting to sleep in your bed rather than the couch, saying too much can take you from a 99.9% to somewhere around a .01% conversion rate. The same is true for your copy. Depending on where your reader is in their thought process, you could be saying way too much when all they want to do is take action.
  • Like the carpenter: Build on your communications by Clarifying
  • Your audience expects to be spoken to in a certain way. You don’t usually speak to a seasoned member like they’re a rookie and vice versa. Maybe it’s a member from a rural area versus metro. Maybe commercial vs. Residential… A lot of times, copywriters miss the mark a little in their tone. It might not be as dramatic as speaking in baby-talk, but it could mean rubbing them the wrong way, even a little with not just what you say, but how you say it.
  • Jeff Rouder, associate professor of psychology in the MU College of Arts and Science. Rouder said that to remember a series of items, people will use “ chunking, ” or grouping, to put together different items. It can be difficult for someone to remember nine random letters. But if that same person is asked to remember nine letters organized in acronyms, IBM-CIA-FBI, for example, the person only has to use three slots in working memory. The difficulty in measuring working memory capacity is assuring that each item presented cannot be grouped together with others to form a larger chunk.
  • Think of acronyms that a new member may not be familiar with. Gobblygook - jargon (Virtual office website, Days on Market, Principal, interest, taxes, insurance)
  • images are as much a part of the copywriting process as anything else. Graphics can support the overall value of the action you want your members to take, but they can also cause confusion. When a reader sees an image that makes her think, it forces her to use extra effort in understanding your offer. That’s the last thing you want your reader doing with your material.
  • Use Graphics (images) to invoke emotion or to draw the eyes to text you want your reader to see. Expand the context or meaning of your words. When people say “ a picture says a thousand words ” . ONLY if the image is in the right context.
  • If the Goal is to pull them into your email or article then: Understand your point | Enjoy your point - Make readers smile. It ’ s more fun to learn when it ’ s fun to read Remember your point - Amusing phrases are more memorable than academic/scientific ones | Share your point - readers are more likely to share playful phrases than business or academic ones.
  • Here ’ s the analysis we get from MSWord. The Flesch-Kinkaid Grade Level measures how hard your copy is to read . It translates the Flesch Reading Ease score into the number of years of schooling people need to understand your copy. Passive Sentence Definition A sentence is passive whenever you encounter the 3 following requirements: a form of the passive auxiliary BE ( be / been / is / are / was / were ), followed by a verb , and then a past form ( verb + ed or an irregular past form ). On chalk board: Is _________ Be _____________ Are __________ Was ______ ed To run the index on your copy by hand: · First, count out a 100-word sample of your story. Stop at 100, even if you‟re in the middle of the sentence. · Then count the number of periods in your sample. Every period makes your copy easier to read, because it makes your average sentence length shorter. · Then count the number of hard words in your sample. Every hard word makes your copy that much harder to read. What‟s a hard word? Words of more than two syllables are hard words, according to the creators of the Gunning-Mueller Fog index. The Fog folks aren‟t the only ones who use this measure for readability. The SMOG (Simple Measure of Gobbledygook) index also measures reading difficulty by counting words of three syllables or more. The Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level and the Flesch Reading Ease also use syllable counts to measure readability. The Flesch-Kinkaid Grade Level measures how hard your copy is to read. It translates the Flesch Reading Ease score into the number of years of schooling people need to understand your copy.
  • Green eggs and Ham: 5.7 words/sentence, 1.02 syllables/word = -1.3 grade level! Front page WSJ - 9th grade level "Write for the expert, but write so that the non-expert can understand." Bernard Kilgore (WSJ editor) FACT: No book sold more than 1M copies in the past 100 years that required more than 12 years of schooling for easy reading National Geographic - 11th grade People Mag - 6th grade NY times Science Pages - 12 years old Write for a 7th grader and engage informed people" Albert Einstein: "any fool can make things bigger, more complex and more violent. It takes a lot of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction! Online Readability calculators (from Newseltter.numbers) chart OR on your computer
  • This flyer says “ this is your guide ” . It doesn ’ t say “ This is why you should Look at it, use it, sell it, etc ”
  • How do your communications make you stand out from the crowd? Are you conveying what is unique and valuable about your organization and programs? Is it clear to the people who matter most to your success who you are and what you do? Is your marketing different enough from other organizations working in the same space? Is your organization perceived as a leader or expert? What ’s your status or reputation within your field? How does your marketing strategy help you position yourself or your nonprofit as a leader or expert? How trusted is your organization, and how does your marketing plan maintain and build trust with your supporters? Do your current supporters think of you favorably? Does your strategy include multiple ways to foster good feelings about your cause and your organization among your supporters? Or are your supporters feeling overlooked, forgotten, or used? Are you repeatedly thanking them for their support? Are you explaining the results you created using their last gift of time, money, or talent? Are you sharing stories with them about why they matter so much to your success? Do you make your supporters, especially your biggest fans, feel like part of your team? 2 Are you connecting with new people? Unless your target audience is a very well-defined and limited group of people without much turnover, your marketing programs should be bringing new people into your community of participants and supporters. This will often require trying entirely new approaches to tap into those networks where you don ’t have a presence now. Have you identified who your newest supporters will be? Are you listening to them and learning what’s important to them? Perhaps most importantly, do you love your job ? Your nonprofit marketing work is about making the world a better place. It ’s important. It matters. Thanks for taking it on.
  • How do your communications make you stand out from the crowd? Are you conveying what is unique and valuable about your organization and programs? Is it clear to the people who matter most to your success who you are and what you do? Is your marketing different enough from other organizations working in the same space? Is your organization perceived as a leader or expert? What ’s your status or reputation within your field? How does your marketing strategy help you position yourself or your nonprofit as a leader or expert? How trusted is your organization, and how does your marketing plan maintain and build trust with your supporters? Do your current supporters think of you favorably? Does your strategy include multiple ways to foster good feelings about your cause and your organization among your supporters? Or are your supporters feeling overlooked, forgotten, or used? Are you repeatedly thanking them for their support? Are you explaining the results you created using their last gift of time, money, or talent? Are you sharing stories with them about why they matter so much to your success? Do you make your supporters, especially your biggest fans, feel like part of your team? 2 Are you connecting with new people? Unless your target audience is a very well-defined and limited group of people without much turnover, your marketing programs should be bringing new people into your community of participants and supporters. This will often require trying entirely new approaches to tap into those networks where you don ’t have a presence now. Have you identified who your newest supporters will be? Are you listening to them and learning what’s important to them? Perhaps most importantly, do you love your job ? Your nonprofit marketing work is about making the world a better place. It ’s important. It matters. Thanks for taking it on.
  • How do your communications make you stand out from the crowd? Are you conveying what is unique and valuable about your organization and programs? Is it clear to the people who matter most to your success who you are and what you do? Is your marketing different enough from other organizations working in the same space? Is your organization perceived as a leader or expert? What ’s your status or reputation within your field? How does your marketing strategy help you position yourself or your nonprofit as a leader or expert? How trusted is your organization, and how does your marketing plan maintain and build trust with your supporters? Do your current supporters think of you favorably? Does your strategy include multiple ways to foster good feelings about your cause and your organization among your supporters? Or are your supporters feeling overlooked, forgotten, or used? Are you repeatedly thanking them for their support? Are you explaining the results you created using their last gift of time, money, or talent? Are you sharing stories with them about why they matter so much to your success? Do you make your supporters, especially your biggest fans, feel like part of your team? 2 Are you connecting with new people? Unless your target audience is a very well-defined and limited group of people without much turnover, your marketing programs should be bringing new people into your community of participants and supporters. This will often require trying entirely new approaches to tap into those networks where you don ’t have a presence now. Have you identified who your newest supporters will be? Are you listening to them and learning what’s important to them? Perhaps most importantly, do you love your job ? Your nonprofit marketing work is about making the world a better place. It ’s important. It matters. Thanks for taking it on.
  • What is your biggest pet peave about your writing and what one thing did you take away that you are going to work on?

Transcript

  • 1. Welcome to Clear, Simple, and Effective Business Writing
  • 2. Marketing is everything you do to:
    • Come up with your services
    • Make your audience aware of it
    • Make them want it, and
    • Getting them to act on it.
  • 3. What you say and how you say it is important.
  • 4. Agenda
    • FOCUS before you write
    • SIMPLIFY as you write
    • CLARIFY after you write
  • 5.
  • 6. Great writing, like good marketing starts at the beginning.  And the beginning is the same as the end - your member.
  • 7. 12 Who is your audience? A 2008 survey at Intel showed employees receive 350 emails per week on average; at Morgan Stanley, employees get 625 new messages per week. Executives ’ incoming email volume was much higher. In some cases, workers spent 20 hours a week just dealing with email. Getting through all those messages every day isn ’ t easy. Certain kinds of email are harder to deal with than others – like the ones that require you to concentrate, open an attachment, or consider a tough decision. It ’ s easier to procrastinate and leave those messages in your inbox when they mean work you weren ’ t planning to do right away.
  • 8.
  • 9. Writing is more than laying out the facts -
    • Get to the point.
    • What are you selling?
    • Don ’ t waste my time.
    14
  • 10. 14
  • 11.
  • 12.
    • X = the WHO
    • Y = the problem you aim to solve
    • Z = the benefit
    • A = the feature (product or service)
    • B = the people doing it (by WHOM)
    BENEFIT STATEMENT: “ X ” (who), who has struggled with “ Y ” (problem) will now be able to “ Z ” (benefit) thanks to “ A ” (what) being done by “ B ” (whom) Focus on the Benefit 18
  • 13. BEFORE: Palm Beach Improvement Company today announced that it will build a new $50 million renovation to the Royal Palm Bridge.
    • AFTER:
    • Thousands of tourists (who),
    • who do not have access to the island (problem) ,
    • will now be able to get to the “millionaire’s playground” (benefit)
    • because of a new $50 million bridge renovation project (what)
    • announced today by Palm Beach Improvement Company (whom).
    19 Problem? Benefit? Feature?
  • 14. A message from your Executive Director:
    • I want to invite you to become part of MAINstream Coalition ’ s strategic planning process. The Board of Directors, the staff and an outside consultant have worked hard to come up with a plan to build this organization into an even more effective voice in Kansas and Western Missouri for the separation of religion and government.
    Problem? Benefit? Feature? Call to Action
  • 15. 21 Our product folds flat to save you valuable office space when you ’ re not using it.
    • “ We ’ ve been in business since 1972. ” (So what?)
    • “ We ’ re a family owned business. ” (So what?)
    • “ Our product folds flat. ” (So what?)
    Since we are a family-owned business, you ’ re always talking to an owner who can answer your questions and solve any problems. We have been in business since 1972 so you ’ ll always know where to find us.
  • 16. Benefits More in Key Messages
  • 17. Focus before you write
  • 18. The writing process includes brainstorming, outlining, writing and editing. Madman Madman Architect Carpenter Janitor
  • 19. Step 2: So what’s your goal?
  • 20. Don ’ t start writing until you know why your audience should care.
  • 21. How will you engage Jane?
  • 22. Key Messages
    • Benefit Exchange – Why should they care?
    • What barriers do they face in following through?
    Early Detection of a Problem Screening will uncover Cancer “ Because I want to know everything is okay”
  • 23. RPAC Example Goal : Raise awareness for RPAC Target Audience : New members
    • Benefits :
    • Help pass bills that will help you sell more homes
    • Your $1 plus all the other $1’s helps your association keep and pass more favorable laws.
    • Protect your commissions by fighting for regulations and for/against legislation
    • Fight for RE issues that promote more real estate sales. This helps you make more $
    • Barriers :
    • The association doesn’t like the candidates I like
    • It doesn’t effect me
    • I don’t have extra $ to spend on this
    • I don’t have to give because we never lose
    • I don’t understand politics
    • My $20 doesn’t matter
  • 24. RPAC Example
    • Key Messages :
    • $2 per month can keep down payments at 5%
    • Your single $1 will keep more money in your pocket
    • Your $1 plus 1000 others = security for your commissions
    • Your $1 plus 1000 others keeps down payments low for your buyers
    • Your $20 can make the difference – fighting for issues that promote RE sales
    • Your $20 + 500 others = no additional taxes on “X”
  • 25. Key Messages (NAR): Figure out what your audience needs and address the need.
    • Goal: Help consumers learn to avoid
    • Predatory lending.
    • Target Audience:
    • First time home buyers
    • Benefit:
    • We want to help
    • We know what they ought to do
    • Barriers
    • People are getting ripped off and don’t even know it.
  • 26. Copywriting mistakes by Paul Cheney and Austin McCraw
    • Action Centric Calls to Action
      • Action words or Power Verbs
  • 27.
    • Action Centric Calls to Action
  • 28. FOCUS before you write: 26
    • Who is your audience ?
    • What is your goal?
      • What is the problem? What do they need?
    • Don't stop with "just the facts ”
      • What's in it for them? Why should they care?
    • What do you want them to do?
  • 29. Your Turn
    • Who is the audience?
    • What ’ s the goal?
    • What will make them care? WIIFT
    • What do you want them to do?
  • 30.
    • Calls to Action
    • Who is the audience?
    • What ’ s the goal?
    • What will make them care? WIIFT
    • What do you want them to do?
  • 31. So...
    • Who is the audience?
    • What ’ s the goal?
    • What will make them care? WIIFT
    • What do you want them to do?
  • 32. Beyond “ the facts ”
    • Who is the audience?
    • What ’ s the goal?
    • What will make them care? WIIFT
    • What do you want them to do?
  • 33.
    • Test Yourself.
    • Who is the audience?
    • What ’ s the goal?
    • What will make them care? WIIFT
    • What do you want them to do?
  • 34. Everyone likes practical advice.
  • 35. Readers will be engaged if you tell a compelling story.
  • 36.
    • Who is the audience?
    • What ’ s the goal?
    • What will make them care? WIIFT
    • What do you want them to do?
    Your turn:
  • 37.
    • If getting motivated is part of your New Year ’ s resolution...
    • We have just the thing for you.
    • You’ ll leave:
    • Reenergized to start selling
    • With new ideas for dealing with the soft market
    • Armed with new ideas for selling to Generation X
  • 38. as you write Simplify
  • 39. Clear and concise makes for easy reading “ To be understood by another person, one must not authorize validity to the very prospect of invalidation which has the potential to assume its own assumption of deficiency within the very milieu of the message. That is the key to clear and effective communication! ”
  • 40. Easy reading improves comprehension
  • 41. Readers scan your documents
  • 42. Copywriting mistakes
    • Action Centric Calls to Action
    • An Unclear Visual Path
  • 43. An Unclear Visual Path
  • 44. Where do you want their eye to go? Readers scan your documents…
  • 45. Heatmap
  • 46. Are you having problems paying your mortgage? How to make your text scan-able
  • 47. Bullet points are an important part of written documents.
    • A bullet is a stop point.
    • The smart association writer uses skimmable copy, keeps sentences short, and uses bulleted lists.
    • A bullet is a stop point.
    • The smart association writer:
      • Uses skimmable copy
      • Keeps sentences short
      • Uses bulleted lists
  • 48. Pay attention to your first paragraph: Readers will be engaged if you tell a compelling story.
  • 49. Pay attention to your first paragraph: Readers want you to get to the point.
  • 50. Copywriting mistakes
    • Action Centric Calls to Action
    • An Unclear Visual Path
    • Visual Intimidation
  • 51.
    • Visual Intimidation
  • 52.
  • 53. Copywriting mistakes
    • Action Centric Calls to Action
    • An Unclear Visual Path
    • Visual Intimidation
    • Saying Too Little
  • 54.  
  • 55. Email announcement
  • 56. Copywriting mistakes
    • Action Centric Calls to Action
    • An Unclear Visual Path
    • Visual Intimidation
    • Saying Too Little
    • Saying Too Much
  • 57. Tips from the Eastern Bergen County Board of REALTORS® in the Aftermath of Hurricane Irene On August 31, 2011, the State of New Jersey was declared a federal disaster area by President Barack Obama in response to the damage caused by Hurricane Irene. Residents and business owners in all counties can apply for assistance including temporary housing, home repairs, low cost loans to cover uninsured property losses and other programs to help recover in the aftermath of the hurricane. Residents and business owners wishing to apply for federal assistance can visit the disaster assistance website http://www.disasterassistance.gov/ or call 1-800-621-FEMA (3362). In addition, New Jersey Department of Banking and Insurance (DOBI) Commissioner Tom Considine issued a news release with tips for consumers on the filing of insurance claims in the aftermath of Hurricane Irene. The release contains information including what to do upon returning to your home following a disaster, such as the fact that if there was any property damage, property should not be disposed of until an insurance adjuster reviews any claim which was filed. The release also contains information on how claims should be reported and handled, information on repairs related to property damage and the National Flood Insurance Program. If you have any questions regarding your insurance policy or require any assistance regarding a claim which was filed, contact DOBI at 1-800-446-7467 or visit their website http://www.state.nj.us/dobi/index.html . One-stop shop for assistance in N.J., call 2-1-1 or visit http://nj211.org/hurricane.cfm. Hurricane Irene Storm victims are encouraged to tele-register for assistance by calling (800) 462-7585 or by registering on line at www.DisasterAssistance.gov . Governor Chris Christie announced that "the federal government has approved New Jersey's request for disaster assistance for New Jerseyans impacted by Hurricane Irene in all 21 counties" New Jersey residents and small businesses in all 21 counties are now eligible to apply for different types of federal assistance, including temporary housing, repair, replacement or other needs such as Disaster Unemployment Assistance, and Small Business Administration disaster loans. Although homeowners insurance does not typically cover flood damage, exceptions may be made due to the severity of resulting damage from the hurricane. Those who suffered damage in every New Jersey county should apply for disaster assistance with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, even if they have insurance or aren't sure they are eligible. Register by phone at 800-621-FEMA (3362) or TTY 800-462-7585 for those with hearing or speech impairments. Specialists are standing by at the toll-free numbers seven days a week, 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. local time, until further notice. Help in other languages is available. Or you can register online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov . You can also apply through a web-enabled mobile device or smartphone by visiting m.fema.gov.   The Eastern Bergen County Board of REALTORS® (EBCBOR), chartered in 1923, is a not-for-profit trade organization that serves more than 3,000 REALTOR® members in Bergen County, N.J. EBCBOR is dedicated to enhancing the business opportunities of its membership by providing them with industry information, political advocacy and education opportunities. For more information, please visit www.bergenboard.com.  
  • 58. Tips from the Eastern Bergen County Board of REALTORS® in the Aftermath of Hurricane Irene On August 31, 2011, the State of New Jersey was declared a federal disaster area by President Barack Obama in response to the damage caused by Hurricane Irene. Residents and business owners in all counties can apply for assistance including temporary housing, home repairs, low cost loans to cover uninsured property losses and other programs to help recover in the aftermath of the hurricane. Residents and business owners wishing to apply for federal assistance can visit the disaster assistance website http://www.disasterassistance.gov/ or call 1-800-621-FEMA (3362). In addition, New Jersey Department of Banking and Insurance (DOBI) Commissioner Tom Considine issued a news release with tips for consumers on the filing of insurance claims in the aftermath of Hurricane Irene. The release contains information including what to do upon returning to your home following a disaster, such as the fact that if there was any property damage, property should not be disposed of until an insurance adjuster reviews any claim which was filed. The release also contains information on how claims should be reported and handled, information on repairs related to property damage and the National Flood Insurance Program. If you have any questions regarding your insurance policy or require any assistance regarding a claim which was filed, contact DOBI at 1-800-446-7467 or visit their website http://www.state.nj.us/dobi/index.html. One-stop shop for assistance in N.J., call 2-1-1 or visit http://nj211.org/hurricane.cfm.   Hurricane Irene Storm victims are encouraged to tele-register for assistance by calling (800) 462-7585 or by registering on line at www.DisasterAssistance.gov. Governor Chris Christie announced that "the federal government has approved New Jersey's request for disaster assistance for New Jerseyans impacted by Hurricane Irene in all 21 counties" New Jersey residents and small businesses in all 21 counties are now eligible to apply for different types of federal assistance, including temporary housing, repair, replacement or other needs such as Disaster Unemployment Assistance, and Small Business Administration disaster loans.   Although homeowners insurance does not typically cover flood damage, exceptions may be made due to the severity of resulting damage from the hurricane. Those who suffered damage in every New Jersey county should apply for disaster assistance with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, even if they have insurance or aren't sure they are eligible. Register by phone at 800-621-FEMA (3362) or TTY 800-462-7585 for those with hearing or speech impairments. Specialists are standing by at the toll-free numbers seven days a week, 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. local time, until further notice. Help in other languages is available. Or you can register online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov. You can also apply through a web-enabled mobile device or smartphone by visiting m.fema.gov.   The Eastern Bergen County Board of REALTORS® (EBCBOR), chartered in 1923, is a not-for-profit trade organization that serves more than 3,000 REALTOR® members in Bergen County, N.J. EBCBOR is dedicated to enhancing the business opportunities of its membership by providing them with industry information, political advocacy and education opportunities. For more information, please visit www.bergenboard.com.   Due to damage caused by Hurricane Irene, residents can apply for federal assistance. This includes temporary housing, home repairs, low cost loans, property losses to help recover in the aftermath of the hurricane.   Apply for federal assistance here : http://www.disasterassistance.gov/ or call 1-800-621-FEMA (3362). Tips for consumers on the filing of insurance claims. Advice on what to do upon returning to your home following a disaster, and how to report claims. Also get information on repairs related to property damage. Department of Banking and Insurance (DOBI) answers questions about insurance policies or assistance regarding claims.   Call DOBI at 1-800-446-7467 or at http://www.state.nj.us/dobi/index.html . For one-stop shop for assistance in N.J., call 2-1-1 or visit http://nj211.org/hurricane.cfm.    Regarding Flood Damage. Although homeowners insurance does not typically cover flood damage, there may be exceptions, due to the severity of the hurricane. If you are in any New Jersey county, you can apply for disaster assistance with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, even if you don’t have insurance or aren't sure you are eligible.   Support is available for those with hearing or speech impairments, or multilingual needs. Open seven days a week, 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. until further notice.   FEMA: Register by phone at 800-621-FEMA (3362) or TTY 800-462-7585 or online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov. You can also apply through a web-enabled mobile device or smartphone by visiting m.fema.gov. can also apply through a web-enabled mobile device or smartphone by visiting m.fema.gov.   The Eastern Bergen County Board of REALTORS® (EBCBOR), is a not-for-profit trade organization that serves more than 3,000 REALTOR® members in Bergen County, N.J. For more information, please visit www.bergenboard.com.  
  • 59. Tips from the Eastern Bergen County Board of REALTORS® in the Aftermath of Hurricane Irene Due to damage caused by Hurricane Irene, residents can apply for federal assistance. This includes temporary housing, home repairs, low cost loans, property losses to help recover in the aftermath of the hurricane.   Apply for federal assistance here : http://www.disasterassistance.gov/ or call 1-800-621-FEMA (3362).   Tips for consumers on the filing of insurance claims. Advice on what to do upon returning to your home following a disaster, and how to report claims. Also get information on repairs related to property damage. Department of Banking and Insurance (DOBI) answers questions about insurance policies or assistance regarding claims.   Call DOBI at 1-800-446-7467 or at http://www.state.nj.us/dobi/index.html . For one-stop shop for assistance in N.J., call 2-1-1 or visit http://nj211.org/hurricane.cfm.    Regarding Flood Damage. Although homeowners insurance does not typically cover flood damage, there may be exceptions, due to the severity of the hurricane. If you are in any New Jersey county, you can apply for disaster assistance with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, even if you don’t have insurance or aren't sure you are eligible.   Support is available for those with hearing or speech impairments, or multilingual needs. Open seven days a week, 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. until further notice.   FEMA: Register by phone at 800-621-FEMA (3362) or TTY 800-462-7585 or online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov. You can also apply through a web-enabled mobile device or smartphone by visiting m.fema.gov.   The Eastern Bergen County Board of REALTORS® (EBCBOR), is a not-for-profit trade organization that serves more than 3,000 REALTOR® members in Bergen County, N.J. For more information, please visit www.bergenboard.com.  
  • 60.  
  • 61.
  • 62.  
  • 63. Print flyer
  • 64. Writing should be conversational.
  • 65. The active voice is clear and concise.
  • 66. Passive Sentences are hard to read
    • The mouse was eaten by the cat.
    32
  • 67. White space improves readability
  • 68. Copywriting mistakes
    • Action Centric Calls to Action
    • An Unclear Visual Path
    • Visual Intimidation
    • Saying Too Little
    • Saying Too Much
    • Misplacing your Tone
  • 69.
    • Write for your newest reader
    • In case you forgot ... People can't remember more than three or four things at once.
    • As discovered by MU psychologists
    Misplacing your Tone Consider Acronyms and Jargon
  • 70. The Ying and Yang of Acronyms and Jargon CCIM SRES E-Pro IREM ARM CPM ABR PMN GRI RLA HOA HUD MLS NAR VOW Call Option DOM PITI
  • 71. Copywriting mistakes
    • Action Centric Calls to Action
    • An Unclear Visual Path
    • Visual Intimidation
    • Saying Too Little
    • Saying Too Much
    • Misplacing your Tone
    • Disconnected Images
  • 72. Disconnected Images
  • 73.
    • What makes it interesting?
    • Does the image draw your eye to the content?
    • Does the graphic expand the meaning of the text?
    About graphics:
  • 74. About graphics:
  • 75. Copywriting mistakes
    • Action Centric Calls to Action
    • An Unclear Visual Path
    • Visual Intimidation
    • Saying Too Little
    • Saying Too Much
    • Misplacing your Tone
    • Disconnected Images
    • Headlines with no Value
  • 76. Headlines and subheads make key points stand out.
  • 77.
    • 1. Enticement
      • WIIFM?
      • Will they
        • Enjoy your point?
        • Remember your point?
        • Share your point?
    40 Simple, Effective Headlines and Subject lines
    • 2. Purpose
      • Does it clearly:
      • Identify your purpose?
      • Convey importance, timeliness and value
  • 78. 39
    • Alternate for the word Free
    • “ Free ” causes spam filters to trap your message, try these alternatives:
      • On the House
    Constant Contact
    • Our Treat
    • Be Our Guest
    • Giveaway
    • Zero/No Cost
    • Complimentary
    • The ‘ Top ’ Appeal
    • Gives up-front expectations and implies an easy to read list.
    • Top 10 Reasons
    • Top 5 Priorities
    • Top 4 Concerns
    • Top 6 Issues
    • Best 6 Tips and Tricks
    • 7 Need-to-Know Strategies
    Simple, Effective Headlines and Subject lines
  • 79. SIMPLIFY as you write: 45
    • Be clear and concise
    • Make your text scan-able
    • Your first paragraph
      • Will they be compelled to action in 2 minutes?
    • Use the active voice
    • Headlines
      • Will you get their attention in 2 seconds?
    • White space, bullets, and graphics
    • Get to the point
    • Simple documents and consistent branding.
  • 80. after you write 47 Clarify
  • 81. Research tells us how to make a document readable.
  • 82. Go to help in MS Word 2003 or 2007, type in Readability Statistics , and follow the instructions 2-3 (<2 for on-line) Average = 14 < 5 < 50 < 7 to 9 th grade! Measure 50
  • 83. Rate This
    • # words/sentence
    • Grade Level
    • WSJ Home page
    • National Geo
    • People Magazine
    • NYT Science page
    Albert Einstein: “ Any fool can make things bigger, more complex and more violent. It takes a lot of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction!”
  • 84. CLARIFY after you write: 52
      • Wait a day before sending your message
      • Spell check, grammar check, and readability check
      • Analyze the message from your reader ’ s perspective
      • Ask someone else to take a look
      • Read it out loud
      • Double-check your call to action
      • Be prepared to re-write.
  • 85.
    • Who is the audience?
    • What ’ s the goal?
    • What will make them care? WIIFT
    • What do you want them to do?
    Now you try:
  • 86. Believe in the power to change © 2010 nSight Marketing
  • 87.
    • Are you getting through to each of your key audiences?
    • Is your association perceived as a leader or expert?
    • Do your supporters think of you favorably?
    • Are you connecting with new people?
    • Do you love your job?
    How do you know if it ’ s working? © 2010 nSight Marketing
  • 88.
    • SPORTS WATCH
    • U.S. OPEN | Blue Valley North grad and Oudin win final
SOCK GRASPS GRAND VICTORY
    • | Star news services
    • Jack Sock can add another title to his already illustrious resume — before he turns 19.
    • American teenagers Sock and Melanie Oudin won the U.S. Open mixed-doubles title Friday, beating eighth-seeded Gisela Dulko and Eduardo Schwank of Argentina 7-6 (7-4), 4-6, 10-8 (tie breaker).
    • “ They’re so young,” Dulko said. “It’s unbelievable what they did.”
    • Sock, 18, and Oudin, 19, needed a wild card to get into the tournament and then upset top-seeded defending champs Bob Bryan and Liezel Huber in the second round.
    • The two attribute their success to good chemistry and a determination to have fun.
    • “ I think that’s kind of why we have been doing well this week,” Sock said. “It’s been like that all tournament for us. Kind of just like playing loose, swinging and having a good time.”
    • Now they’ll split $150,000.
    • Oudin was the darling of the 2009 U.S. Open, reaching the women’s quarterfinals. Sock, who turned pro this year after graduating from Blue Valley North, achieved his first Grand Slam singles victory in the first round this year before being eliminated by Andy Roddick.
  • 89. How do I know if it’s worth reading?
    • If I give it a 10-second look, is it worth scanning? (Please note, I did not say reading.)
    • Do I really need all this information? (Why?)
    • Do I know what you expect me to do with the information in it?
    • Do I really need all this information? (Why?)
    • Is it relevant to me? How do I know that?
    • Do I really need all this information? (Why?)
    • If I flip through a few pages will I learn enough?
    • Do I really need all this information? (Why?)
    • If you give it to me, I will probably lose it. Can I easily find another copy? Will I remember it's worth looking for?
    • Volunteer leaders have a need for speed and relevance. Any time they answer &quot;no&quot; to one of the above questions, you lose them.
    • Sadly, I've worked with too many chapter leaders who have no idea what their association mission is - let alone 29 pages of information.
    • Volunteer attention for a manual is a challenge. Short, sweet, easy, fun, accessible all help increase odds of use.
    • Cynthia D'Amour, Leadership Strategist, People Power Unlimited
  • 90. Now What?
    • Believe in the power to change.
    • What will you do differently after today? (look back at your assessment)
    • Conduct a Communications Audit.
    • Marketing controls the messages.
      • Streamline them so that every staff member becomes the best possible messenger .
  • 91. Establish some rules for your staff: 52
    • What ’ s the benefit?
    • Limit Acronyms
    • <14 words per sentence
    • Read from the member ’ s perspective
    • Don ’ t write angry
    • Use of graphics
    • Call to action
    • Your logo
    • White space - simple words
    • Write for the newest member
    • Develop Battle Buddies
  • 92. For more communications and marketing ideas, bookmark this blog: www.nSightMarketing.BLOGSPOT.com Melynn Sight [email_address] 913.261.9100