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Effects of date rape and the need for prevention is complete.

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  • 1. Effects of Date Rape and the Need for Prevention
    Nancy Slone
    Argosy University
  • 2. EFFECTS OF DATE RAPE
    Effects of Date Rape: and Need for Prevention
  • 3.
    • No one on this entire Earth has a right to force you to have sex! I don’t care if it is a boyfriend that you love and care about and have known for years or someone you have just met at a party; he has no right whatsoever to force you into having sex with him. If he does, then it is called date rape and it is a serious crime and needs to be reported right away. It is one of the most offensive, demoralizing illegal acts committed on young girls and women everywhere and is punishable by law! This paper focuses on the major factors affecting the increase of date rape, past and present research, and much needed steps to prevent this horrific act (crime).
    Note: Girls and women everywhere need to take a stand for their sexual rights against those who mean them harm. No means no and don’t except any less than what you mean. Is date rape really on the increase?
  • 4.
    • The effects of date rape often go unheard or unseen by anyone except the victim. When someone you knows socially forces you to have sex it is “date rape”. It is a serious crime that is on the rise and often goes unreported by the victim. The perpetrator may use physical and verbal threats, emotional blackmail, or alcohol and drugs to force or trick you into having sex! Studies have shown, that the majority of rapes are committed by persons the victim has known, and only 2 percent are committed by strangers (Crawford, 2008).
    Note: Drugs and/or alcohol are common factors into the date rape formula often involving both people.
  • 5.
    • One of the major problems increasing the statistics on date rape is the increase of illegal internet pharmacies access to drugs such as Rohyponol (a well known date rape drug). Rohypnol is illegal in the United States and has many hidden titles such as: roopies, circles, roofies, and the forget pill. Rohypnols works like a tranquilizer; it causes muscle weakness, slurred speech, fatigue, loss of judgment and amnesia that last up to twenty four hours. This drug is considered the ‘date rape “drug of choice, because when it is slipped into an unsuspecting victim’s drink, a sexual assault takes place without the victim being able to fight back and remember what happened.
    Note: Date rape is the act of “forcing” your date into sexual intercourse: the key word being force is what separates this crime from rape and romance.
  • 6.
    • Past studies done by (DuMont, MacDonald, Rot bard, Aslant, Baibridge, and Cohen, 2009) reports suspected drug-facilitated sexual rape is a common problem. “Since the mid 1990’s there has been a growing number of unconfirmed reports of assailants using prescription and non prescription drugs to induce sedation and amnesia to commit rape (Dumont, 2009). It is clear from the reports that date rape is on the rise and the suspected date rape drugs are a major contributor to this fact. In my opinion not enough research is being done to stop the growing problem of date rape and illegal drug access.
    Note: Fear and shame play key roles in why date rape isn’t reported, not ignorance.
  • 7. The effects of date rape are emotional as well as physical. Emotional effects include loss of trust in oneself and others, fearful of many situations, avoids interactions with men, and causing hardships for her in her daily routines and responsibilities, such as going to work, school and interacting with acquaintances and friends.
    Note: Dept. of Justice reports About 200,000 women are raped each year.
  • 8.
    • Victims often feel the need to avoid their attacker, who often is a part of her daily life. Sometimes depression and anxiety are common effects after the rape has occurred and may leave her feeling guilty and ashamed and blaming herself for the attack. Although some changes have taken place in the treatments of rape victims, there are still many paths left untraveled because of society ignorance and lack of controlled research, causing for additional unneeded pain and stress for the victims.
    Note: Depression/isolation often becomes the normal
    Behavior of victims without support.
  • 9.
    • Studies done by (Crawford, Wright, and Birchmeier, 2008) conclude that it is essential that educational programs be created and distributed to eliminate the confusion. The education should focus on important issues such as: “date rape is just as wrong as rape from a stranger”, “a victim is never asking for it any matter how the person dresses”, and “no one ever deserves it”.
  • In conclusion, rapists are not always strangers, and when someone you know, regardless whether it is a date, steady boyfriend or girlfriend, or friend, forces you to have sex, it is RAPE! Educational programs need to be made available at all levels for all students. Everyone needs to be informed that a woman who is under the influence of alcohol or drugs is not capable of consensual sex. Author’s (Faulkner, Howard, and Lee, 2008) combined studies showed that the overwhelming need for correct information to be distributed nationwide to victims is of utmost importance and is detrimental in lowering the statistics on the crime. There are many myths flying around that lead woman to undermine the seriousness of this crime and lower their defenses.
    Notes: “Myths often lead
    The victim astray, being
    More vulnerable to being
    Targeted.
  • 10.
    • There are steps that must be taken that a potential victim can do to prevent rape from happening: first, don’t allow alcohol or drugs to decrease your awareness, never accept unopened drinks from anyone while out on a date, trust your gut instincts always, and don’t ever leave a party or social outing with someone you have just met. Awareness and education are key factors in assisting students to make the right choices.
    Notes: Effective risk reducers: communication sexual intentions/boundaries. Be clear about your sexual feelings and expectations, and most importantly know who you party with!
  • 11. Date rape is a devastating offense that is not taken serious enough to allow for stricter laws and punishable crimes. Drugs like Rohypnol are unfortunately on the rise and easily accessed through illegal internet pharmacies worldwide. When date rape drugs are used the victim is defenseless and awakes to no mental remembrances of the crime that has been committed against her.
    Note: There has to be justice in
    Order to complete the healing process
    zno
  • 12.
    • Women need to know how to protect themselves from falling victim to this deplorable force of her sexual rights. Our best efforts would be to get the necessary education out to girls while they are young that allows them the chance to be able to defend themselves against potential perpetrators. There are steps that women can take to protect themselves and most importantly victims need to know that they are not alone! When a rape has occurred, it needs to be reported immediately so victims can get the physical, emotional and psychological help they will need.
    Notes: Education/Information should be
    Mandatory for all ages in all school levels.
  • 13.
    • References
    • 14.  
    • 15. Crawford, Emily; Wright, Margaret O'Dougherty; Birchmeier, Zachary. Journal of American College Health, Nov/Dec 2008, Vol. 57 Issue 3, Choices, p 261-272.
    • 16.  
    • 17. Du Mont, Janice; Macdonald, Sheila; Rotbard, Nomi; Asllani, Eriola; Bainbridge, Deidre; Cohen, Marsha M.. CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal, 3/4/2009 Doctor's Health Matters, p 513-519.
    • 18.  
    • 19. Faulkner, Ginger; Kolts, Russell; Hicks, Gail. Sex Roles, Aug 2008, Vol. 59 Issue 3/4, p 139- 150.
    • 20.  
    • 21. False results put drug arrests under microscope By: Mimi Hall. USA Today, 11/04/2008.
    • 22. Herrman, Judith W... Pediatric Nursing, May/Jun2009, Vol. 35 Issue 3, p 164-170.
    • 23.  
    • 24. Howard, Donna E.; Griffin, Melinda A.; Boekeloo, Bradley O... Adolescence, Winter 2008, Vol. 43 Issue 172, p 733-750.
    • 25.  
    • 26. Lee, Steven J.; Levounis, Petros. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, Sep 2008, Vol. 40 Issue 3, p 245-253.
    • 27.  
    • 28. Rempala, Daniel M.; Geers, Andrew L... Journal of Social Psychology, Aug 2009, Vol.149 Issue 4, p 495-512.
    • 29.  
    • 30. School Library Journal, (Trust) Oct 2008 Curriculum Connections, Vol. 54, p66-68.
    • 31.  
    • 32. Young, Melissa A... Feminist Collections: A Quarterly of Women's Studies Resources, Summer/Fall 2008, Vol. 29 Issue 3/4, p 42-43.
    • Outline for Literature Review
    • 33. Focus on the LITERATURE
    • 34.  
    • 35. 1. Drug-facilitated sexual assault (date rape)
    • 36. Sexual assault services offered
    • 37. Un-confirmed rape reports growing
    • 38. Lack of research on victims of rape/other forms of sexual assault
    • 39. Students unclear about definitions of date rape/sexual assault.
    • 40. 2. Rapists are not always strangers/anonymous attackers.
    • 41. Reports on statistics from Bureau of Justice
    • 42. Prevention Tips
    • 43. 3. Survivors of sexual violence
    • 44. Important dos and don’ts
    • 45. The signs of sexual assault
    • 46. Reporting date rape
    • 47. 4. Date rape drugs
    • 48. Description and names of these drugs
    • 49. Are they accessible and by whom
    • 50. 5. Government control issues
    • 51. Illegal Online pharmacies
    • 52. Colleges and Universities
    • 53. Narcotics Agents
    • 54.  
    • 55. 6. Students need help and support from families and the communities
    • 56. How communities can get involved
    • 57. How the family can get involved