NO FOLLOW VS DOFOLLOWONLY GOOGLE PAYS ATTENTION TO rel=”nofollow”GOOGLE ACTION                                 NO FOLLOW L...
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No follow vs follow

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No follow vs dofollow

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No follow vs follow

  1. 1. NO FOLLOW VS DOFOLLOWONLY GOOGLE PAYS ATTENTION TO rel=”nofollow”GOOGLE ACTION NO FOLLOW LINK DOFOLLOW LINKCrawl to target page tru link NO YES (Not always)Tak into account in a link profile YES YESUse for Relevance Calculation YES YESSend page rank thru link NO (Onsite YES) YESSend Domain authority PROBABLY YESOver-optimization penalty <20% >80%Count as outgoing link (offsite) YES YESPage rank Sculpting YES (Onsite) NOCause Google Dance YES YESThe Do-Follow Links ArgumentThe proponents of the "do-follow only" camp have a pretty logical argument backing them up. In termsof SEO value ("link juice", to use the nomenclature) Google should theoretically only count do-followlinks. Any link that is no-follow has a direct and clear instruction telling search engines to ignore it. Thinkof the rel=nofollow tag as one of those detour signs you occasionally see. The street is still there, its justyoure being told to pass by it.Basically, there is no true “dofollow”, it is just NOT using the “nofollow” tag.So, when you are looking for sites and blogs that you could leave your link on (through reciprocal links,commenting on a blog, directory submissions, buying links, etc) figure out if the links in the particularsection of the site you are aiming for uses “nofollow” or not. (A good way to do this is to view the sourcecode, or find some good “dofollow” lists.The No-Follow Links ArgumentOn the flip side of the coin, some people believe that no follow links actually do provide some form oflink benefit. Over and above this, they can provide great referral traffic from people clicking throughyour links. An excellent example of useful no follow links are blog comment links. The vast majority ofblogs are no follow these days, which was put in place to discourage comment spam. Howevever, a well-place blog comment on a popular blog can deliver hundreds of visitors in a very short space of time.There are many reasons you would want to use the “nofollow” tag, such as:1) Paid Links: This is recommended by Google. Essentially, your sites page rank give a small amount ofrank juice to the sites you link to (which helps their search engine ranking, which is the purpose of linkbuilding, to get that juice from others). If you have a paid link on your site, it’s essentially buying a higherrank in Google. They don’t like that.2) Maybe in your blog’s comment section (if using most blog software, this is automatic). It is up to youif you want your commentators to get link juice back to their site. It is personal preference.3) When linking to major, very popular sites. If you are linking to google.com, yahoo.com, digg.com (thefront page), cnn.com, or whoever else, they are already popular, so you might as well use “nofollow”since your link won’t make or break them.

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