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"Before I begin, can I ask all students to switch their mobile devices ON?"
"Before I begin, can I ask all students to switch their mobile devices ON?"
"Before I begin, can I ask all students to switch their mobile devices ON?"
"Before I begin, can I ask all students to switch their mobile devices ON?"
"Before I begin, can I ask all students to switch their mobile devices ON?"
"Before I begin, can I ask all students to switch their mobile devices ON?"
"Before I begin, can I ask all students to switch their mobile devices ON?"
"Before I begin, can I ask all students to switch their mobile devices ON?"
"Before I begin, can I ask all students to switch their mobile devices ON?"
"Before I begin, can I ask all students to switch their mobile devices ON?"
"Before I begin, can I ask all students to switch their mobile devices ON?"
"Before I begin, can I ask all students to switch their mobile devices ON?"
"Before I begin, can I ask all students to switch their mobile devices ON?"
"Before I begin, can I ask all students to switch their mobile devices ON?"
"Before I begin, can I ask all students to switch their mobile devices ON?"
"Before I begin, can I ask all students to switch their mobile devices ON?"
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"Before I begin, can I ask all students to switch their mobile devices ON?"

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Presented by Sian Lindsay, Nitin Parmar, Mike Cameron, Kate Reader & Ajmal Sultany at ALT-C 2010, Nottingham. Abstract at: http://drgn.in/9IqdiX

Presented by Sian Lindsay, Nitin Parmar, Mike Cameron, Kate Reader & Ajmal Sultany at ALT-C 2010, Nottingham. Abstract at: http://drgn.in/9IqdiX

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  • That’s right it’s a wooden clicker!
  • At City, Bath and Durham we have basic, simple (wireless) clickers now – like this TurningPoint one here which works off radio wavesThese work well an students enjoy them a lot, however they are expensive (£40 each) and lecturers and EVS practitioners commonly cite problems with handing clickers out, collecting them back in.Also found that with our clickers, restricted to multiple choice answers, can’t offer free text answers, which does restrict the types of questions that the lecturer can ask, could argue that by allowing for free text answers, you can ask questions that test at the higher end of cognitive complexityNow there are clickers which allow for free text entry, however these are more expensive, heavier and arguably more likely to run out of battery faster than the the regular clickers.
  • So we decided to make use of the mobile devices that students have in their pocket as voting devices using a system called ResponseWareWe felt this would help solve some of the logistical and pedagogic problems of the existing EVS
  • First up,ResponseWare™ was used to facilitate a workshop event for roughly 40 EVS practitioners in April 2010.Thewordleshows a visual summaryof their comments relating to their likes and dislikes of voting using a mobile device to vote withGenerally quite positive, one of the comments was “In control, with a device I was familiar with”
  • Before we used Response Ware with students at City, through a survey we asked 816 of them how they felt about using their mobile devices in class• Forty-nine percent of students questioned (n=396) said that they did not want to use their mobile phone in class. Twelve percent of students believed that it would be too distracting to use in this way and 16% said that they did not want to use it in class and viewed their mobile as a device for staying in touch with friends and family only. • Combining these percentages, one can see that a large proportion - 77% - of students questioned did not want to use their mobile phone in class. This observation was supported by unprompted comments from 12 students who expressed concerns related to distraction, trivialising lectures and removing the personal/human element to learning. We tested this view by piloting mobile phone use in class as voting devices…
  • Generally the views were positive, for example…
  • Have a short 30 sec audio recording from Cengiz here…CengizTurkoglu from the School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences used ResponseWare™ extensively with student mobile devices and in PC labs where students used PCs to vote and write back full-text answers. Like the EVS practitioners and students, he condoned ResponseWare’s ability to allow textual feedback and work in parallel with regular clickers. However only 10-15% of his students used their mobile devices for voting with. Using focus group feedback this could be explained by the inability and/or costliness of some mobile phones to access the Internet. At the time, City University did not have a wireless network capable of providing access for mobile phones - had this have been in place, more students may have tried ResponseWare™ because it would have allowed them free Internet access. Cengiz will be trying ResponseWare™ again next year and hopes to have better success with it now that a mobile phone-enabled WiFi is in place at City and students with Smartphones become more commonplace.
  • Rww and tp anywhere for instant text feedback!
  • This is how Response Ware works…Mobile device definition here
  • Transcript

    • 1. "Before I begin, can I ask all students to switch their mobile devices ON?"<br />Sian Lindsay (City University London)<br />Nitin Parmar (University of Bath)<br />Mike Cameron (Durham University)<br />Kate Reader & Ajmal Sultany <br />(City University, London)<br />Thurs 9th Sept 2010<br />
    • 2. What is this?<br />
    • 3. EVS classroom circa 1966<br />
    • 4. EVS classroom 44 years later…<br />
    • 5. EVS...The Future?<br />Survey stats Feb 2010: 99% City students asked own a type of mobile device capable of using RWW<br />Allows for free-text answers, anonymity maintained and lecturer can feedback to individual devices<br />Can be used in parallel with regular clickers<br />Eliminates practical/logistical and maintenance problems of present EVS<br />A TurningPoint product = integration with PowerPoint <br />
    • 6. EVS Practitioners’ View of RWW<br />Most people (72%) expressed positive notions about being asked to use their mobile device to vote with<br />
    • 7. EVS Practitioners’ View of RWW<br /><ul><li> 71% able to use their mobile device, 4% were unsure and 24% unable to take part – had poor mobile phone reception and denied access on certain mobile browsers</li></ul>• 14% said they experienced known technical problems, e.g. need to refresh the screen following each question <br />• 75% of respondents said there were differences in using their mobile device:<br />seeing graphs on their device’s screen<br />being able to provide free-text answers<br />being less immediate than the clickers where you just press and go<br />
    • 8. Would City students want to use their mobile devices in class?<br />
    • 9. City Students’ View of RWW<br />“(using my mobile) gave me a sense of freedom because I know my mobile phone, there’s that level of comfort...you’re able to use your own stuff without having to rely on the clickers”<br />“I liked that people weren’t put at a disadvantage if they didn’t have the right type of mobile or were on pay as you go contracts and had to pay to get online”<br />“got me to know how to use my mobile phone better!...I had no problems with it, I was fine. I preferred using my mobile phone actually rather than clickers...I don’t know why...maybe it’s because it’s my own mobile phone...I’m just used to it I guess ”<br />“while the questions were coming up in succession we didn’t really have time to get distracted, so it wasn’t a problem for me”<br />
    • 10. City Students’ View of RWW<br />“I didn’t have feelings either way really, but maybe my mobile was slightly more distracting...on one occasion a text message came through which led to me reading it after the questions were asked...if my mobile had been in my bag or pocket it wouldn’t have been touched. This is a failing on my part, but one brought on by the use of these phones.”<br />“I couldn’t access the Internet on my mobile phone without having to pay for it and that’s pretty much the only reason I didn’t use it...simply cost (if using mobile) I probably would have checked a text message on my phone irrespective of where it was...in secondary school and ‘A’ levels and stuff you weren’t allowed phones in your pocket let alone out on the table at University, right there in front of you using it for lectures! ”<br />
    • 11. Lecturer View of RWW: CengizTurkoglu from City University<br />
    • 12. ResponseWare at the University of Bath<br />Nitin Parmar<br />Learning Technologist<br />N.R.Parmar@bath.ac.uk go.bath.ac.uk/nitin<br />
    • 13. ResponseWare in Economics<br /><ul><li> A revision focused seminar to tested students’ skills with Microsoft Excel
    • 14. Questions designed at True/False activities, as well as MCQs
    • 15. Techniques employed were influenced by Mazur’s Peer Instruction sequence
    • 16. http://drgn.in/aw3JuP
    • 17. Technical issues with ResponseWare tempered some of the benefits</li></ul>RaniaNaguib, Department of Economics, http://drgn.in/a0AoqT<br />
    • 18. ResponseWare in CompSci<br /><ul><li> Remedial classes in ‘coding dojo’ computer lab based session
    • 19. Students submitted anonymous responses to MCQs and free text entryslides
    • 20. Allowed students to receive effective feedback and influence the direction of the class
    • 21. Inability to view free text instantly led to additional time overhead</li></ul>Paper by Cliffe, Davenport, De Vos, Hayes & Parmar, http://opus.bath.ac.uk/18958/<br />
    • 22. Lessons Learned<br />Mismatch between student expectations and student experience<br />Pros: Simple, familiar, anonymous, free-text, two-way feedback, PowerPoint integration, parallel use with regular clickers<br />Cons: dependent on Internet connection (ideally free WiFi so students not out of pocket), not all students will have right mobile device/browser, limited characters for text feedback, students generally apathetic?<br />What Next? – keep exploring features, TurningPoint Anywhere (to see student feedback immediately on-scree), ‘teaching by questioning’ approach and Google…<br />
    • 23. ResponseWare (RWW)<br />

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