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High Impact Practices in Paraprofessional Training
 

High Impact Practices in Paraprofessional Training

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Presentation from Joseph Davis at the 2011 National Conference for Paraprofessionals.

Presentation from Joseph Davis at the 2011 National Conference for Paraprofessionals.

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    High Impact Practices in Paraprofessional Training High Impact Practices in Paraprofessional Training Presentation Transcript

    • High Impact Practices in Paraprofessional training:Professional mentoring
      Joseph H. Davis, L.C.C.C.
      Project ISR
      May 12, 2011
    • L.C.C.C.’s Paraprofessional Training History
      Project FLAGSHIP
      Project SETSAIL
      Project REACH
      ISR
      All projects have featured mentoring
    • Mentoring
      Mentoring places emphasis on student growth:
      Academic
      Professional
      Personal
      Often students at community colleges are “returning adults” with a variety of responsibilities beyond the college classroom.
      Mentoring focuses upon student success and growth beyond the classroom.
    • Objectives of mentoring
      Linking Students to Role Model
      Support Academic Success
      Adjustment to College Life
      Linking Students to College Community
      Emotional Support
      Promote Professional Behavior
      Connection to Professional Oppurtunities
    • L.C.C.C. Mentor Model
      Mentors are not in an administrative relationship or evaluative relationship with students.
      Mentors have a history of professional success.
      Mentor sessions are scheduled, structured but remain informal (there is always food!).
      Mentors have on-going communication with mentee.
    • Sample Topics of mentor meetings
      Stress management
      Professionalism
      Legal Issues in special education
      Adjustment to college life
      Communication skills
      Team building
      Job search skills
      Interview process
      Careers in education
    • Dynamic Relationships Between Mentor/mentee
      Mentors are selected based upon “soft skills”
      Mentors did not have “smooth path to profession” ( much like CC students!)
      Mentors show commitment to profession
      The match between mentor and mentee is crucial
    • Sample Activities: Communication/Team Building
      Birthday Line-up
      Tower Building
      Feather Play
      Feather Juggle
      Feather Relay
      Puzzle
      Snake Pit
    • Questions?