Writing for the Web/Web-original Storytelling 2012
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  • 1. Writing for the Web/!Web-original Storytelling!
  • 2. What  we’ll  cover    Text    Listening  Exercise    Webified  Script  vs.  Web-­‐original  Storytelling      Techniques  for  Web-­‐original  Storytelling   2  
  • 3. 1.  Text  
  • 4.  1.  Text  can  be  searched   4  
  • 5. 2.  People  like  to  read   Are you reading this text?! 5  
  • 6. 2.  People  like  to  read   6  
  • 7. 2.  People  like  to  read   7  
  • 8. 3.  Text  is  fast   3:14  to  listen    vs.    1:00  to  read  text  (480  words)   8  
  • 9. 4.  Text  is  more  subtle   Core  Publisher  sites   July  2011  hourly  trafAic   9  
  • 10. Strong  content  frequency     10  
  • 11. Infrequent  content   11  
  • 12. 5.  Good  wriGng  engages   12  
  • 13. Two  terms    Nut  graf   News  value  of  the  story   Why  now?      Lede   The  opening  of  the  story   The  lede  is  not  to  be  buried     13  
  • 14. 2.  Listening  Exercise  
  • 15. Webified  Script   17  
  • 16. Compare  nut  graphs   Web:   But  some  experts  worry  that  when  it   comes  to  their  health,  boomers  are  sPll   woefully  unprepared  —  or  worse,  in   denial.  Radio:  Some  experts  worry  that  the  generaPon  now  approaching  rePrement  may  actually  be  less  healthy  in  old  age  and  that  could  have  serious  financial  consequences  for  the  naPon  as  a  whole.  
  • 17. Compare  ledes  Radio:  Most  people  over  50  think  theyre  likely  to  be    healthier  and  more  acPve  in  rePrement  than  their    parents  were.  Thats  what  people  said  in  a  poll    conducted  by  NPR,  the  Robert  Wood  Johnson    FoundaPon  and  the  Harvard  School  of  Public  Health.    But  people  may  be  wrong.  Some  experts  worry  that    the  generaPon  now  approaching  rePrement  may    actually  be  less  healthy  in  old  age  and  that  could    have  serious  financial  consequences  for  the  naPon    as  a  whole.  NPRs  Julie  Rovner  reports.  JULIE  ROVNER:  If  you  want  to  see  what  it  means  to    live  a  long  and  acPve  life,  look  no  further  than  the    rec  room  at  the  Greenspring  Village  RePrement    Community  in  Springfield,  Virginia.  (SOUNDBITE  OF  VIDEO  GAME)  ROVNER:  This  is  the  Wii  bowling  compePPon  for  the    Northern  Virginia  Senior  Olympics.  Up  now,  the  80    to  99  age  group.  Given  these  compePtors  age,    organizers  are  making  a  few  accommodaPons.  
  • 18. Compare  ledes  Web:  Most  baby  boomers  say  theyre  planning  on  an  acPve    and  healthy  rePrement,  according  to  a  new  poll    conducted  by  NPR,  the  Robert  Wood  Johnson    FoundaPon  and  the  Harvard  School  of  Public  Health.    And,  in  a  switch  from  earlier  years,  more  than  two-­‐  thirds  recognize  the  threat  of  long-­‐term  care  expenses    to  their  financial  futures.  But  some  experts  worry  that  when  it  comes  to  their    health,  boomers  are  sPll  woefully  unprepared  —  or    worse,  in  denial.  "The  mismatch  between  how  people  think  the  next    10  to  15  years  is  going  to  go  and  what  current  rePrees    experience  is  something  thats  very  consistent,"  says    Jeff  Goldsmith,  a  health  care  futurist  and  author  of    The  Long  Baby  Boom:  An  Op2mis2c  Vision  for  a    Graying  Genera2on,  a  book  about  aging  baby    boomers.  "There  is  no  quesPon  that  one  disPnguishing    feature  of  our  generaPon  is  this  extraordinary,  almost    genePc  opPmism.  And  the  poll  results  look  to  me  like    a  lot  of  that  opPmism  was  drawn  from  a  deep  well  of    self-­‐delusion."  
  • 19. AddiPonal  ReporPng  
  • 20. 3.  Webified  Script     vs.    Web-­‐original  Storytelling  
  • 21. Top  10  stories  NPR.org  Stories  originated    from  a  blog   23  
  • 22. Webified  radio  script   26  
  • 23. 4.  Some  Techniques  for    Web-­‐original  Storytelling  
  • 24. Linking  Out   30  
  • 25. AggregaGon  “I  love  aggregaPon.”     31  
  • 26. I  love  aggregaPon.  AggregaPng,  as  I  wrote,  is  what    editors  do.  It  is,  to  repeat  myself,  “plugging  one    another  into  the  bounty  of  the  informaPon  universe.”  Readers  come  to  The  Times  not  just  for  our  original  reporPng,  but  for  our  best  judgment  of  what  else  is    worth  reading  or  watching  out  there,  and  for  the    comments  posted  by  all  of  you.        -­‐Bill  Keller,  former  Execu2ve  Editor,  New  York  Times  
  • 27. AggregaGon/CuraGon   33  
  • 28. AggregaGon/CuraGon   34  
  • 29. Bolded  Subheadlines   35  
  • 30. Bolded  Subheadlines   36  
  • 31. Bullet  Points   37  
  • 32. From  a  reader’s  perspective:  Five  differences  in  Web  vs.  radio  writing     1.  The  journey  isn’t  as  important  as  the  ending  –  so  give  me  that  Airst   2.  I  will  judge  you  for  poor  grammar,  spelling  and  punctuation   3.  If  you  can  say  it  better  than  your  source,  summarize   4.  Multiple  ideas  in  one  story  won’t  confuse  me  –  I  can  reread   5.  Details,  details,  details  –  this  proves  you  know  what  you’re  talking  about  
  • 33. From  a  reader’s  perspective:  Five  similarities  in  Web  vs.  radio  writing     1.  A  good  story,  is  a  good  story,  is  a  good  story   2.  Simple  writing  is  the  clearest  writing  –  subject,  verb,  object   3.  Sub-­‐headlines  signal  a  change     4.  If  it’s  good,  I’ll  stay   5.  People’s  names  are  important  
  • 34. QuesGons?   40  
  • 35. Assignment    Rewrite  a  radio  story  for  the  web  audience.      Write  a  web-­‐original  story  (try  doing  this  before  wriPng   your  radio  feature).    Due  Thursday  COB      WFPL,  WNIJ,  WSKG,  KUNC  send  to  ksung@npr.org      KCUR,  KETR,  WFSU,  Delmarva  send  to  eathas@npr.org      Criteria:  lede,  nut  graf,  details  (links,  #s),  readability,  style    Highlights  video  on  Friday   41