Writing for the Web: Webifying Features and Spots

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This is a guide to translating your radio stories into web copy. We cover why text is important to your online audience, the differences between radio and online features, and some quick tips on converting your radio newscasts into web copy. The story we listened to in slide 11 is below: http://www.npr.org/2011/09/28/140853479/boomers-delusion-about-health-in-retirement

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  • http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/03/07/148161162/inhalable-caffeine-maker-gets-warning-letter-from-fda
  • http://blogs.kqed.org/capitalnotes/2012/03/14/tax-initiative-deal-in-the-works-gathering-signatures-would-be-pricey/
  • http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/wrvo/news.newsmain/article/4466/0/1839868/Newscast/Afternoon.Newscast.81211
  • http://michiganradio.org/post/mornings-news-257http://michiganradio.org/post/mornings-news-258http://michiganradio.org/post/mornings-news-headlines-1
  • Writing for the Web: Webifying Features and Spots

    1. 1. Writing for the WebWebifying Features and Spots But first, this news…
    2. 2. text
    3. 3. 1. Text can be searched 3
    4. 4. 2. People like to read Are you reading this text? 4
    5. 5. 2. People like to read 5
    6. 6. 2. People like to read 6
    7. 7. 3. Text is fast 3:14 to listen vs. 1:00 to read text (480 words) 7
    8. 8. 4. Text is more subtle Core Publisher sites July 2011 hourly traffic 8
    9. 9. 5. Good writing engages 9
    10. 10. Two terms Nut graf News value of the story Why now? Lede The opening of the story The lede is not to be buried 10
    11. 11. Writing for the WebWebifying Features and Spots
    12. 12. Compare nut graphsWeb:But some experts worry that when itcomes to their health, boomers arestill woefully unprepared — or worse,in denial.Radio:Some experts worry that the generation nowapproaching retirement may actually be lesshealthy in old age and that could haveserious financial consequences for thenation as a whole.
    13. 13. Compare ledesRadio:Most people over 50 think theyre likely to behealthier and more active in retirement than theirparents were. Thats what people said in a pollconducted by NPR, the Robert Wood JohnsonFoundation and the Harvard School of Public Health.But people may be wrong. Some experts worry thatthe generation now approaching retirement mayactually be less healthy in old age and that couldhave serious financial consequences for the nationas a whole. NPRs Julie Rovner reports.JULIE ROVNER: If you want to see what it means tolive a long and active life, look no further than therec room at the Greenspring Village RetirementCommunity in Springfield, Virginia.(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO GAME)ROVNER: This is the Wii bowling competition for theNorthern Virginia Senior Olympics. Up now, the 80to 99 age group. Given these competitors age,organizers are making a few accommodations.
    14. 14. Compare ledesWeb:Most baby boomers say theyre planning on an activeand healthy retirement, according to a new pollconducted by NPR, the Robert Wood JohnsonFoundation and the Harvard School of Public Health.And, in a switch from earlier years, more than two-thirds recognize the threat of long-term care expensesto their financial futures.But some experts worry that when it comes to theirhealth, boomers are still woefully unprepared — orworse, in denial."The mismatch between how people think the next10 to 15 years is going to go and what current retirees experience is something thats very consistent," says Jeff Goldsmith, a health care futurist and author ofThe Long Baby Boom: An Optimistic Vision for aGraying Generation, a book about aging babyboomers. "There is no question that one distinguishingfeature of our generation is this extraordinary, almostgenetic optimism. And the poll results look to me likea lot of that optimism was drawn from a deep well ofself-delusion."
    15. 15. Additional Reporting
    16. 16. From a reader’s perspective:Five differences in Web vs. radio writing 1. The journey isn’t as important as the facts – so give me those first 2. I will judge you for poor grammar, spelling and punctuation 3. If you can say it better than your source, summarize 4. Multiple ideas in one story won’t confuse me – I can reread 5. Details, details, details – this proves you know what you’re talking about
    17. 17. From a reader’s perspective:Five similarities in Web vs. radio writing 1. A good story, is a good story, is a good story 2. Simple writing is the clearest writing – subject, verb, object 3. Sub-headlines signal a change 4. If it’s good, I’ll stay 5. People’s names are important
    18. 18. Spots
    19. 19. The QABCDS of converting your scriptQ: Put quotation marks around transcribed actsA: Attribution follows the quote, says vs. saidB: Break up long paragraphs, sentences and quotesC: Convert numbers into digitsD: Add details like numbers and helpful linksS: Use bolded subheads to help your audience
    20. 20. Typical newscast online 24
    21. 21. The QABCDS of converting your scriptQ: Put quotation marks around transcribed actsA: Attribution follows the quote, says vs. saidB: Break up long paragraphs, sentences and quotesC: Convert numbers into digitsD: Add details like numbers and helpful linksS: Use bolded subheads to help your audience
    22. 22. Questions?Ki-Min Sungksung@npr.org310-815-4220 29

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