Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Writing for the web april 2013
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Writing for the web april 2013

762
views

Published on


0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
762
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Wri$ng  for  the  Web  April  2013  Ki-­‐Min  Sung,  Digital  News  Training  
  • 2. Recap:  Headlines   2  
  • 3. 3  
  • 4. Headlines  Assignments    “Why  isn’t  anyone  in  Nebraska  driving  an  electric  pick-­‐up   truck?”  by  Bill  Kelly,  NET  Nebraska    “How  the  Worst  Year  Ever  for  Honeybees  Limits  What  You   Get  to  Eat,”  by  Vivian  Goodman,  WKSU    “Ohio  supplies  the  world  with  a  high-­‐demand  product:   Wooden  carousels,”  by  M.L.  Shultze,  WKSU    “As  WaWs  Towers  crumble,  researchers  hatch  a  plan  to   keep  it  standing,”  by  Jenny  Radelet,  KCRW    “Should  Coloradans  Water  Their  Lawns  with  Bath  Water?”   by  Lesley  McClurg,  CPR   4  
  • 5. Web  wri$ng    Webified  radio  stories      Web-­‐na^ve  storytelling   5  
  • 6. Online  News  Cycle   6  
  • 7. Webify  vs.  Web-­‐na$ve    Who  is  my  audience?    What  is  most  relevant?    What  is  the  best  use  of  my  ^me?     7  
  • 8. What  doesn’t  work…   8  
  • 9. What  doesn’t  work:  Transcripts   9  
  • 10. What  doesn’t  work:  Intro  +  Audio   10  
  • 11. Visual  Medium   11  
  • 12. What  works…   12  
  • 13. What  works…   13  
  • 14. Webifying  radio  scripts      Rewrite  the  lede    Edit  quotes      Add  context       14  
  • 15. Webified  Story   16  
  • 16. Compare  ledes  Radio:  Most  people  over  50  think  theyre  likely  to  be    healthier  and  more  ac^ve  in  re^rement  than  their    parents  were.  Thats  what  people  said  in  a  poll    conducted  by  NPR,  the  Robert  Wood  Johnson    Founda^on  and  the  Harvard  School  of  Public  Health.    But  people  may  be  wrong.  Some  experts  worry  that    the  genera^on  now  approaching  re^rement  may    actually  be  less  healthy  in  old  age  and  that  could    have  serious  financial  consequences  for  the  na^on    as  a  whole.  NPRs  Julie  Rovner  reports.  JULIE  ROVNER:  If  you  want  to  see  what  it  means  to    live  a  long  and  ac^ve  life,  look  no  further  than  the    rec  room  at  the  Greenspring  Village  Re^rement    Community  in  Springfield,  Virginia.  (SOUNDBITE  OF  VIDEO  GAME)  ROVNER:  This  is  the  Wii  bowling  compe^^on  for  the    Northern  Virginia  Senior  Olympics.  Up  now,  the  80    to  99  age  group.  Given  these  compe^tors  age,    organizers  are  making  a  few  accommoda^ons.  
  • 17. Compare  ledes  Web:  Most  baby  boomers  say  theyre  planning  on  an  ac^ve    and  healthy  re^rement,  according  to  a  new  poll    conducted  by  NPR,  the  Robert  Wood  Johnson    Founda^on  and  the  Harvard  School  of  Public  Health.    And,  in  a  switch  from  earlier  years,  more  than  two-­‐  thirds  recognize  the  threat  of  long-­‐term  care  expenses    to  their  financial  futures.  But  some  experts  worry  that  when  it  comes  to  their    health,  boomers  are  s^ll  woefully  unprepared  —  or    worse,  in  denial.  "The  mismatch  between  how  people  think  the  next    10  to  15  years  is  going  to  go  and  what  current  re^rees    experience  is  something  thats  very  consistent,"  says    Jeff  Goldsmith,  a  health  care  futurist  and  author  of    The  Long  Baby  Boom:  An  Op2mis2c  Vision  for  a    Graying  Genera2on,  a  book  about  aging  baby    boomers.  "There  is  no  ques^on  that  one  dis^nguishing    feature  of  our  genera^on  is  this  extraordinary,  almost    gene^c  op^mism.  And  the  poll  results  look  to  me  like    a  lot  of  that  op^mism  was  drawn  from  a  deep  well  of    self-­‐delusion."  
  • 18. Addi^onal  Repor^ng  
  • 19. Webifying:  Break  format   20  
  • 20. 21  
  • 21. Five  Differences:  Web  vs.  Radio  Wri$ng  1.  Get  to  the  point,  tell  me  why  it’s  important  2.  Grammar  and  spelling  are  important  3.  You  can  say  it  beWer  than  your  source,  summarize    4.  Details  –  this  proves  you  know  what  you’re  talking  about  5.  Headlines  maWer  A  LOT     22  
  • 22. Looking  Ahead    Not  all  radio  stories  are  meant  to  be  web  stories    Try  wri^ng  web  text  first  –  it  can  even  make  your   broadcast  story  beWer    If  you’re  not  breaking  news,  what  are  you  adding  that  will   dis^nguish  your  story     23  
  • 23. WEB-­‐NATIVE  STORYTELLING   7  ways  to  be  na$ve   24  
  • 24. 1.  Create  web-­‐only  stories   25  
  • 25. 2.  Link  out  to  relevant  material   26  
  • 26. 3.  Embed  content   27  
  • 27. 4.  Update  stories   28  
  • 28. 4.  Cura$on   29  
  • 29. 5.  Make  it  easy  (Scannable)   30  
  • 30. Bolded  Subheads   31  
  • 31. 6.  Let  the  format  fit  the  story   32  
  • 32. 7.  Listen  &  respond  to  your  audience   33  
  • 33. CASE  STUDY:  KPLU   34  
  • 34. Web  Checklist  (must  hit  at  least  2)  1.  Is  it  ^mely?  (Are  we  ahead  of  others?)  2.  Are  you  adding  something  NEW  to  a  known  story?  3.  Does  it  have  a  unique  angle  or  perspec^ve?  4.  Does  it  ask  users  to  take  ac^on  or  express  an   opinion?  5.  Is  it  shareable?  (Would  YOU  share  it?)  6.  Does  it  celebrate  an  idea,  person  or  place?   35  
  • 35.                    Radio  stories  treated  differently  online  
  • 36. Broadcast  first     Web  first  Web  days  later   Broadcast  week  later  
  • 37. Web  to  Air   38  
  • 38. What  to  ask…    1.  What’s  next?  2.  Who  are  the  key  players?  3.  How  did  we  get  to  this  point?    4.  Why  does  this  maWer?   39  
  • 39. Ques$ons   40  
  • 40. Assignment     Write  1  webified  radio  story   -­‐or-­‐     1  web-­‐na^ve  story   COB:  Thursday,  April  11   dseditorial@npr.org   41