How to make serious stories shareable on social media
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How to make serious stories shareable on social media

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We’ve heard this a lot lately: Fun stories, not serious stories, work on social media. But we’ve found otherwise. You can shape serious stories to make them shareable and more informative for the ...

We’ve heard this a lot lately: Fun stories, not serious stories, work on social media. But we’ve found otherwise. You can shape serious stories to make them shareable and more informative for the public.

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How to make serious stories shareable on social media How to make serious stories shareable on social media Presentation Transcript

  • How to make ‘serious’ stories shareable November 2013
  • Can “serious” stories do well on social media? 2
  • What we did  We reviewed 809 stories from the Local Stories Project.  One-by-one, we examined all 809 stories and labeled them either fun or serious.  What do we mean by “fun” and “serious”? 3
  • Fun and serious, defined 4
  • Fun stories  Highlight something unusual, quirky, or funny.  Offer people a break in the day to laugh or to have a discussion about their city. 5
  • Serious stories  Have real-life implications.  Help people stay aware of the news that matters to them. 6
  • How we measure success: Of the unique people who see each post, what percentage like it, share it, or comment on it? 7
  • Stations are creating as many fun stories as serious stories Of the 809 stories, 53 percent were serious and 47 percent were fun. 8
  • Serious stories were just as successful as fun stories The percentage of people who liked, shared, or commented was the same for both serious and fun stories – about 1 percent of those who saw the posts interacted with them. 9
  • Top serious stories were shared just as much as top fun stories When looking at the top 50 stories, the percentage of people who liked, shared, or commented was 3 percent — the same for both serious and fun stories. 10
  • Case studies 11
  • Case studies Find it here: bit.ly/1e1xxQT 12
  • Case studies “Craft a top-notch headline that plays up the controversy or tension in the story.” -Emilie Ritter Saunders, Boise State Public Radio 13
  • Case studies Find it here: bit.ly/1apqy2v 14
  • Case studies “Ultimately, I think the key to making people share is if they see the story affecting them personally. Facebook is a personal network, after all.” -Katrina Schwartz, KQED 15
  • Case studies Find it here: bit.ly/1co7u4c 16
  • Case studies “There's always more people to reach, and not everyone is going to absorb our longer form stories, but many people will - as you know - gravitate toward something that provides the "take home" messages quickly.” -Mark Brush, Michigan Radio 17
  • Case studies Find it here: bit.ly/1i9Hv5m 18
  • Case studies “Why would I (or a person in a group I want to reach) click on this story or share it? Answer that question and use your results to guide what you use” -Kelsey Proud, St. Louis Public Radio 19
  • Case studies Find it here: bit.ly/1bDzb98 20
  • More Find these stories here: bit.ly/serious-case-studies 21
  • More Advice from stations: n.pr/station-serious-advice 22
  • 5 questions for making serious-but-shareable content 23
  • What’s the headline? 24
  • What’s the headline? • Write a headline first — before you begin crafting your story. • The headline should be a simple, straightforward, specific promise about what the story’s about. 25
  • What is your approach to telling the story? 26
  • What is your approach to telling the story? • What’s the best way to convey the story? Whatever you decide, get to the point right away and make the piece easy to understand. • Charts, images, videos or other visuals can be helpful, but only incorporate them if it’s useful to the audience. 27
  • How will this be different? 28
  • How will this be different? • Cut through the noise. A lot of media might be covering the story, but how can you differentiate yourself? • What can you add to the story? • Advance the story: What are the next questions people will ask? • Create an explainer. 29
  • Why will people share it? 30
  • Why will people share it? • Imagine someone coming across your story online — what will make them take the next step to share it? • Will it make them happy, sad, curious, enraged, informed or intrigued? • If it leaves your audience with no reason to interact, you’ve missed something. 31
  • What’s next? 32
  • What’s next? • Don’t ignore the story after it’s published. • Compile the metrics. • Take a look at the comments and shares to learn how people felt about the story. This should inform future coverage. 33
  • Print the 5 questions: http://bit.ly/serious-checklist 34
  • This webinar and more info: n.pr/shareable-serious 35
  • Questions? eathas@npr.org | @ericathas tgorman@npr.org | @gteresa 36
  • This webinar and more info: n.pr/shareable-serious 37
  • This webinar and more info: n.pr/shareable-serious 38