Finding the Image, Story or Video You Need by Aggregating Content

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  • Speaking of Flickr…
  • Explain the different licenses,
  • Explain the different licenses,
  • Finding the Image, Story or Video You Need by Aggregating Content

    1. 1. Finding the story, image orvideo you need
    2. 2. Housekeeping Submit questions throughout on the right hand side in the chat box Resources and presentation will be in Dropbox Check out the hashtag #NPRKnight on Twitter 2
    3. 3. Previously, on #NPRKnight training… The importance of headlines Writing for the web Your daily workflow Visual Storytelling 3
    4. 4. This week, on #NPRKnight training…I. What are we talking about again?• What is aggregation?• When should we aggregate?II. Making aggregation visual:• When should we add photos?• When should we add videos? 4
    5. 5. What is aggregation? 5
    6. 6. A fancy word for using your resources wisely 6
    7. 7. Anatomy of an aggregated post 7
    8. 8. Anatomy of an aggregated post 8
    9. 9. Anatomy of an aggregated post 9
    10. 10. Anatomy of an aggregated post 10
    11. 11. Anatomy of an aggregated post Source is NAMED Source is LINKED TO Quoted TEXT LOOKS DIFFERENT (blocked text, colored, italics) Use no more than 200 WORDS, if relevant - more likely a paragraph or a sentence. Keep the TEXT TOGETHER (as it appeared in the original story) 11
    12. 12. Five Reasons to Aggregate? It has local relevance – your audience is interested You can add context to the story Someone else is doing an excellent job covering a story You don’t have reporters or resources on the scene You discover a story from another source 12
    13. 13. 13
    14. 14. When should I look for photos? What is the best way to represent my story? Think of the visuals from the beginning of your reporting What are my resources? 14
    15. 15. What are my resources? 15
    16. 16. One tactic: Creative Commons Creative Commons, by Karin Dalziel (CC BY) 16
    17. 17. 1. "Attribution" license – symbolized as “BY”1. “Non-Commercial" license – symbolized as “NC”2. “No Derivatives” – symbolized as “ND”1. “ShareAlike” – symbolized as “SA” 17
    18. 18. NPR uses this: "Attribution" license – symbolized as “BY” • You must attribute the photo to the source “Non-Commercial" license – symbolized as “NC” 18
    19. 19. Other: “No Derivatives” – symbolized as “ND” Means that you can’t crop a photo or edit it 19
    20. 20. Other: “ShareAlike” – symbolized as “SA” Means you license your new creation under the same Creative Commons ShareAlike license. 20
    21. 21. Four Questions to Ask Before Using a Photo Which image best conveys the important elements of the story? What is the editorial relevance of each frame? What aspects of the image best convey the story to the reader? Will the caption add editorial relevance to the image, not justify the use of the image? 21
    22. 22. http://search.creativecommons.org/ 22
    23. 23. 23
    24. 24. 24
    25. 25. 25
    26. 26. 26
    27. 27. 27
    28. 28. 28
    29. 29. VIDEO 29
    30. 30. When is it worth using videos? When you want to add a dynamic element to a story When text, images and audio aren’t enough When the clip provides a sense of place for the story When news is happening quickly and you need to save time/space on describing something (don’t say, SHOW it) It has local relevance – your audience is interested 30
    31. 31. How to find videos 31
    32. 32. How to find videos Often the video your story needs is already out there. So here are some ways to use YouTube, Vimeo and other video services to work for your site. Jim Hill from KUNC offers his tips for finding videos with minimal effort 32
    33. 33. 1. Subscribe to a search query in RSS onYouTube http://www.youtube.com/rss/search/QUERY.rss You can refine your search by separating queries with a comma. EXAMPLE: you can search for Boulder, Colorado You can also change the order by changing “relevance” to “published” or “view count.” 33
    34. 34. 2. Subscribe to a tag query in RSS on YouTube EXAMPLE: I want to subscribe to any video tagged “Denver” or “Craft Beer” or “Flying Squirrel” Tip: replace spaces with a dash < – > in your query http://www.youtube.com/rss/search/denver-craftbeer- flyingsquirrel.rss 34
    35. 35. 3. Play with YouTube News and Google News How do they know where you are? Trust us, Google knows everything. 35
    36. 36. 4. Learn to make search filters work for you Search for only ‘recently uploaded’ videos Search for an exact match only: “<query>” Search for only HD videos Force a search to include a second query: <query1> + <query2> Force a search to OMIT a second query: <query1> - <query2> 36
    37. 37. 5. Don’t forget Vimeo! it’s a great place to find more arts & culture driven content, less news a. Browse CATEGORIES http://vimeo.com/categories b. Browse GROUPS http://vimeo.com/groups c. Browse CHANNELS http://vimeo.com/channels 37
    38. 38. 5. But be sure you can use the videos you find Is there an embed code or a link? Check for Creative Commons license Give credit 38
    39. 39. When do you make video its own story?Consider two things:1. Impact of the clip2. Your own editorial judgment. 39
    40. 40. Impact of the clip 40
    41. 41. Editorial Judgment—It’s still all about the impact Start with this question: Would this be of interest to your audience or further your own reporting on a subject? For video only: Give a brief reason in text for why your audience should click play. Treat it like social sharing: here it is and here’s the reason to watch. Video-only posts live or die based on your headline and visual. Give it the watch test: If you’re watching over and over or sharing it in the office, it’s good enough to go online. 41
    42. 42. Aggregation: Bringing it all home 42
    43. 43. Aggregation: Bringing it all home 43
    44. 44. Aggregation: Bringing it all home 44
    45. 45. Aggregation: Bringing it all home 45
    46. 46. And, of course, strong headlines! Seattle $1.1 billion short of funding pensions Video: Haunting time-lapse of Seattle without peopleVideo: How police confronted the Café Racer killer And The Drunkest City In America Goes To…Boston!LAPD manhunt rumor control:Drones, sightings and whats actually true (updated) 46
    47. 47. Questions? 47
    48. 48. Assignment:Write a short aggegrated post, using anycombination of photo, video, and storiesfrom another sources. Don’t forget theheadline!Email to dseditorial@npr.org with yourstation call letters in the email subject line 48

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