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  • I want to jump in here. Photos draw people in, are a valuable storyteller and can be that one thing that causes someone to click on your story on Facebook or on your site. As we talk, keep in mind that just like making photos, finding them online can take time and practice. This isn’t a quick fix
  • Have tabs open with some examples
  • Speaking of Flickr…
  • Explain the different licenses,
  • Explain the different licenses,

Finding and Acquiring Photos Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Finding and Acquiring Photos October 31, 2012
  • 2. What tactics and sites do you use to find and acquire photos? Submit your answer 
  • 3. Housekeeping Submit questions throughout on the right hand side in the chat box Resources and presentation will be in Dropbox Teresa Gorman, @gteresa, tgorman@npr.org 3
  • 4. 4
  • 5. What We’ll Talk About TodayI. Be a photo editor: questions to ask whilefinding and choosing imagesII. 6 strategies to build your photo libraryIII. Don’t fall for these online photo myths 5
  • 6. Questions to ask: Remember this? 6
  • 7. Practical Ways To Approach Visual Storytelling What is the best way to represent my story — single image, slideshow, audio slideshow, video, graphic What are my resources? Think of the visuals from the beginning of your reporting 7
  • 8. More Questions to Ask Before Using a Photo Which image best conveys the important elements of the story Be ready to argue the editorial relevance of each frame. What aspects of the image best convey the story to the reader? Captions should add editorial relevance to the image, not justify the use of the image 8
  • 9. Questions to Ask Before Using a Photo What is the best visual aspect of the story? Are there images that illustrate this? Which image best conveys the important elements of the story Argue the editorial relevance of each frame. What aspects of the image best convey the story to the reader Captions should add editorial relevance to the image, not justify the use of the image Does the photo follow journalism principles? 9
  • 10. II. Think Long Term: Create a Photo Library Photo via Flickr/Ozyman 10
  • 11. Think Long Term: Create a Photo Library  Save your photos  Follow good captioning practices  Share with your coworkers Some stations use: Flickr, Picasa, Dropbox, Lightroom, their own services. Photo via Flickr/Ozyman 11
  • 12. 6 Strategies to Fill Your Photo Library Photo via Flickr/ Eva Ekeblad 12
  • 13. 1. Subscription ServicesGood for: Can use for specific news events Resource for higher quality photosKeep in mind: Make sure to use photos in the right context May not be able to share on social media (review your contract) 13
  • 14. 2. Make Photos Yourself NPR’s David Welna in Cleveland, Ohio. 14 Photo by WCPN ideastream’s Brian Bull
  • 15. You are your own best source of photosGood for: Fewer rights questions Fewer questions about accuracyKeep in mind: Practice, with your phone and/or camera Ask your colleagues to also take photos 15
  • 16. 3. Partnerships Photo by Flickr User Lady/Bird, CC 16
  • 17. PartnershipsGood for: Utilizing limited resources wisely Expanding reach Using your strengthsKeep in mind: Be clear about where and how you use photos in a partnership 17
  • 18. Partnerships: Places to start1. Volunteers2. Universities3. Local media4. Local bloggers5. Photo meetups6. Amateur photographers 18
  • 19. Example: WVXU 19
  • 20. WVXU “Win win all around” Short and long-term • Built up photo library Used volunteer photog for special events, stock photography 20
  • 21. 4. Creative Commons Photo used with Creative Commons license, via karindalziel 21
  • 22. Creative Commons/ FlickrGood for: Budget friendly ‘Creative’ photosKeep in mind: Be careful about licenses Be clear in caption about where it is from Always have the correct byline 22
  • 23. 1. "Attribution" license – symbolized as “BY”1. “Non-Commercial" license – symbolized as “NC”2. “No Derivatives” – symbolized as “ND”1. “ShareAlike” – symbolized as “SA” 23
  • 24. NPR uses this: "Attribution" license – symbolized as “BY” • You must attribute the photo to the source “Non-Commercial" license – symbolized as “NC” 24
  • 25. Other: “No Derivatives” – symbolized as “ND” Means that you can’t crop a photo or edit it 25
  • 26. Other: “ShareAlike” – symbolized as “SA” Means you license your new creation under the same Creative Commons ShareAlike license. 26
  • 27. http://search.creativecommons.org/ 27
  • 28. 5. Hand Outs 2.0 Spc. Morgan Chami, a Dayton, Ohio, native shakes the paw of Perro, a military working dog, after her reenlistment ceremony July 20 at Camp Nathan Smith, Afghanistan. Photo by Spc. Matt Kuzara, DVIDS via Flickr, CC. 28
  • 29. Handouts 2.0Good for: Budget friendly ‘Creative’ photos, out-of-dateKeep in mind: Be clear in caption about where it is from This is usually press, so take with a grain of salt 29
  • 30. Hand Outs 2.0: Some Examples City of Boston Archives: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cityofbostonarchives/ Defense Visual Information Dept: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dvids National Gallery of Art: https://images.nga.gov/en/page/show_home_page.h tml National Park Service: http://www.nps.gov/photosmultimedia/photogallerie s.htm 30
  • 31. Hand Outs 2.0: Some ExamplesMore here:http://bit.ly/handoutexamplesAdd your own examples and resources! 31
  • 32. 6. The Crowd By Flickr user ke0112, CC by Flickr user tyle_r, CC 32
  • 33. 6a: Search 33
  • 34. Search! 34
  • 35. The Crowd Twitter.com/search Facebook.com/search Instagram -web.stagram.com/, statigr.am/ Flickr.com/search/advanced Reddit.com 35
  • 36. The Crowd: Verifying Photos Online Too good to be true? 36
  • 37. The Crowd: Verifying Photos Online 37
  • 38. The Crowd: Verifying Photos Online Too good to be true? It probably is. 38
  • 39. The Crowd: Verifying Photos Online 39
  • 40. The Crowd: Verifying Photos OnlineBut not always 40
  • 41. The Crowd: Verifying Photos Online Use your news judgment Examine the weather and season in photo Check clothes/building/vehicles in photo Who uploaded it? Message/Call them http://images.google.com/ http://tineye.com 41
  • 42. The Crowd: Verifying Photos Online 42
  • 43. The Crowd: Verifying Photos Online 43
  • 44. The Crowd: Ask Ask Create community around photos Include listeners and readers in news coverage 44
  • 45. Example: Breaking News 45
  • 46. Example: Long Term Photo of the day series Sue Washburn heading out to the osprey nest off the Oswegatchie Flow in Wanakena. Photo: Kristin Rehder. Via NCPR.org 46
  • 47. Example: North Country Public Radio Community: Started in 2005, has become self- sustaining “Better quality eyeballs, ” Dale Hobson, web manager, says.  Lower bounce rate  More page views per visit  Often most popular feature on NCPR’s Facebook page 47
  • 48. Don’t fall for these online photo myths Picture via Picture Perfect Pose on Flickr 48
  • 49. Three Myths About Using Photos Online1.Its okay to use anything thats online as long as I give credit, because it is public. 49
  • 50. Three Myths About Using Photos Online1. Its okayto use anything thats online as long as I give credit. 50
  • 51. Three Myths About Using Photos Online2. Its okay to use somethingif I asked for permission anddidnt get a response, ordon’t know who took aphoto. 51
  • 52. Three Myths About Using Photos Online1. Its okay to use anything thats online as long as I give credit.2. Its okay to use something if I asked for permission and didnt get a response, or don’t know who took a photo. 52
  • 53. Three Myths About Using Photos Online3. Its okay to useanything as long as Imnot making any moneyoff of it. 53
  • 54. Three Myths About Using Photos Online1. Its okay to use anything thats online as long as I give credit.2. Its okay to use something if I asked for permission and didnt get a response, or don’t know who took a photo.3. Its okay to use anything as long as Im not making any money off of it. 54
  • 55. Three Myths About Using Photos Online Photo via Flickr User Thomas Hawk 55
  • 56. Questions?
  • 57. Your Assignment Search for two images to accompany two stories Keep in mind last week’s photo lessons Caption each image and email them to dseditorial@npr.org Put your station call letters (ex: WLRN) in the subject line 57