by
Tamara Carr
1
What we will cover:
2
 What rationale/goals underlie your proposed plan?
 What are your self-perceived strengths and weaknesses
with respect t...
•Every Situation Is Unique
•Clear Rules In The Classroom, With
Specific Consequences
•Routines To Support Expected Behavio...
 The primary aim of school discipline is to manage and
correct student behavior in order to develop self-
discipline.
Man...
6
•Caring and supportive adult-student relationships. Adults demonstrate
warmth, respect, support, and caring toward all stu...
1.10: Strategic use of praise and rewards: Praise and
rewards are used strategically to recognize and
reinforce social and...
9
 Focus on the message: emphasize the informative rather than the
controlling function of praise &rewards
 Avoid teaching...
Clear and fair behavioral expectations and rules.
Behavioral expectations and classroom and school
rules (and their conseq...
12
13
 III.2 Awareness of rules and policies. All school staff,
students, and parents are informed of school rules,
consequence...
III.7 Self-discipline in correction. Disciplinary
encounters are approached as learning opportunities.
Correction procedur...
 Problem solving during correction: the problem-solving meeting & reflection action
plan
 The problem solving meeting go...
 III.6 Supports and modifications. Adults in the school
reflect upon what they might provide or change in the
classroom a...
 Provide multiple opportunities for students to apply &
practice social, emotional & moral competencies of self
disciplin...
19
 Academic instruction & activities engage & motivate
learning providing
 Demonstrate caring & support for all students
...
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Reflection Classroom Management

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Classroom management, first year teacher

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  • not a single, all-encompassing handbook to find answers or solutions to classroom discipline and management. must all be handled with numerous strategies and philosophies or theories. My philosophybulleted pointsEVERY SITUATIONIS UNIQUE: Understanding that there may be reasons behind a student's misbehavior does not excuse the behavior. Nor does it mean there should not be consequences.  It is the job of the educator to find what works to correct or prevent behaviorSo what works…BP AND BPThe most influential aspect of managing problem behavior is the teacher. The teacher must be self-disciplined: consistent, fair when it comes to discipline problems we have to be grounded in proven theories~ unshakabe we cant let personal experiences or judgments sway us~
  • Read slide then : We could add in here “where learning happens”. Overall, ensuring a structured environment conducive to student learning is the best way to avoid behavior problems.
  • When I do not have the tools to handle or prevent bps I must seek out answers. If there is a knowledge gap I must seek out professional development programs, continuing education courses and or research to fill in even the minutest holes.Speak to teachers, social workers, principlal if you having that problem others are too..
  • Background
  • I don’t use praise and rewardsstrategicallyI knew to incorporate verbal praise, a thumbs up or high five, we have bucs or tokens
  • What I did not know was that there are theories behind how and when I should or should not use these tactics. I now know these certain strategies can be usedoccasionally, everyday or to recognize a specific length of time.
  • During my first year of teaching, I began with one set of rules passed down from a certified teacher who had been in there preiviously and….
  • simply expected the students to follow them.I had no consequences besides a note home. Then, once behavior started to decay I started taking points off grades. However, I did not feel that was fair because I realized if I am having discipline problems it is not the fault of the children. It is my responsibility to outline what I expect and have clear repercussions for misbehavior. During first month I acknowledged I needed to take claases~So from this class I gathered together all the resources and ~In component three I address how to avoid this failing in the upcoming term.
  • Until this writing this paper I did not know classroom rules must be observable, measurable, positively stated, understandable and always applicable. If my expectation is for students to remain safe in my care I must request something like: “Keep hands and feet to self” and “Use materials correctly.” If I were to keep my rule of “Don’t run”it would continue to fail to manage the classroom.
  • Classroom rules must be posted throughout the room. They should be sent home with student, posted to class website or school classroom website. During the first month, or more as I see children once per week, of school I should teach the rules of the school and my classroom. During the second month, go over the rules every other week. Finally review the rules periodically as needed.
  • Upcoming classes will be provided with all aspects of component 3.7. Error correction is calm and respectful but its not consistent, brief, immedieatebc I didn’t’ have solid rules you question yourself` and then error correctionis not immediate becomes messy, inconsistent, time consuming
  • When I speak a student about problem behaviors I will do so in private and begin by describing the problem. Then ask the students what they think they should do instead. Inquire to why the alternative is better. Finally ask the student to show me or tell me an example a new way to handle the situation.(Challenging is I meet with over 400 hundred students a week~ I will encourage the student to maintain the new behavior. As necessary, I can prompt the student with visual or verbal cues to use new behavior strategy, re-teach the behavior or find alternative choices. )
  • Previous to this class, in my mind “increased monitoring, supervision, and positive reinforcement of behavior are provided” meant simply observing and correcting behavior. This fall I will draw on active supervision. It is a way to monitor students by moving around the room, scanning the class and interacting frequently. Interactions include delivering consequences or corrective behavior.
  • Continuing with 3.7 to
  • Reflection Classroom Management

    1. 1. by Tamara Carr 1
    2. 2. What we will cover: 2
    3. 3.  What rationale/goals underlie your proposed plan?  What are your self-perceived strengths and weaknesses with respect to comprehensive classroom discipline?  What strategies and techniques will you use to address what you believe are primary (and malleable) causes of misbehavior?  What general techniques, and examples of specific activities, do you intend to use to develop self-discipline and to prevent and correct discipline problems?  How does the plan compare to what you are currently doing? 3
    4. 4. •Every Situation Is Unique •Clear Rules In The Classroom, With Specific Consequences •Routines To Support Expected Behavior •You Are Always The Role Model 4
    5. 5.  The primary aim of school discipline is to manage and correct student behavior in order to develop self- discipline. Managing and correcting student behavior is essential to a successful &welcoming classroom environment. 5
    6. 6. 6
    7. 7. •Caring and supportive adult-student relationships. Adults demonstrate warmth, respect, support, and caring toward all students (irrespective of gender, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic background, disabilities, previous history of behavior). Every student has a supportive relationship with at least one adult at school. •Authoritative approach to prevention and correction. In general, the schoolwide approach to discipline is authoritative, but not harsh and controlling, or permissive. There is a healthy blend of support and respect along with structure, high expectations, and supervision. •High expectations for all. Adults convey a general attitude that all children can succeed both academically and socially. High academic and behavioral expectations permeate the classroom and school atmosphere, as reflected in both policies and practices. 7
    8. 8. 1.10: Strategic use of praise and rewards: Praise and rewards are used strategically to recognize and reinforce social and emotional competencies that underlie prosocial behavior (even when rewards are not salient.) For example, students are routinely recognized with praise and occasionally with rewards for demonstrating empathy, caring, responsibility and respect. 8
    9. 9. 9
    10. 10.  Focus on the message: emphasize the informative rather than the controlling function of praise &rewards  Avoid teaching students that the most important reason to act in a morally & socially responsible manner is to earn rewards or to be praised  Praise & reward the cognitive & emotional processes & dispositions associated with self-discipline  Use rewards only occasionally for behavior that is intrinsically motivated & more often for behavior that is not intrinsically motivated  When used for purposed of reinforcement make praise & rewards contingent on the success in demonstrating desired behavior or the effort expended  Highlight the present & future usefulness of the behavior praised & rewarded  Encourage students to self-evaluate & self-reinforce their prosocial behavior & to take pride in their own behavior  Actively involve students in determining the rewards, the behaviors to be rewarded & in praising & rewarding others 10
    11. 11. Clear and fair behavioral expectations and rules. Behavioral expectations and classroom and school rules (and their consequences) are clear fair and consistently enforced. They are taught early in the school year and are reviewed as often as needed; schoolwide expectations are worded positively and posted in classrooms and hallways; students and parents are presented with classroom expectations/rules and the code of conduct. 11
    12. 12. 12
    13. 13. 13
    14. 14.  III.2 Awareness of rules and policies. All school staff, students, and parents are informed of school rules, consequences, and due process rights. At the classroom level, students are aware of the classroom rules and are reminded of such, as appropriate, throughout the school year. Teaching rules and routines to students at the beginning of the year and enforcing them consistently across time increases student academic achievement and task engagement (Evertson&Emer, 1982; Johnson, Stoner & Green, 1996). 14
    15. 15. III.7 Self-discipline in correction. Disciplinary encounters are approached as learning opportunities. Correction procedures include teaching students problem solving strategies that they can use to help prevent the behavior from recurring and are encouraged to assume responsibility and reflect upon the impact of their behavior on self and others. 15
    16. 16.  Problem solving during correction: the problem-solving meeting & reflection action plan  The problem solving meeting goals:  To encourage reasoning and behavior that is not centered solely on punishment and rewards  To encourage responsibility for one’s choices and behaviors  To encourage the valuing of relationships with others  Three goals lead to four action steps:  Identify the problem behavior & explore why it occurred  Discuss why the behavior is indeed a problem  Encourage responsibility for ones actions, including accepting consequences & fixing the problem where appropriate  Help the student determine how to avoid repeating the behavior: generate alternative solutions, evaluate each solution, choose the best solution & commit to it  The reflection action plan  Self management techniques  Goal setting  Self-instruction  Self-recording  Self-evaluation  Self-reinforcement or  Self-punishment 16
    17. 17.  III.6 Supports and modifications. Adults in the school reflect upon what they might provide or change in the classroom and school to improve student behavior. For example, as needed, curriculum adaptations are made; seating arrangements are changed; increased monitoring, supervision, and positive reinforcement of behavior are provided; and home and/or peer support is solicited. Studies show problem behavior is influenced by the amount of supervisor-to-student interactions (Simonsen, Fairbanks, Briesch, Myers &Sugai, 2008). 17
    18. 18.  Provide multiple opportunities for students to apply & practice social, emotional & moral competencies of self discipline  Service learning (servicelearing.org)  Peer-assisted learning (devstu.org/csc)  (Peer mediation)  Class meetings (Classmaps) 18
    19. 19. 19
    20. 20.  Academic instruction & activities engage & motivate learning providing  Demonstrate caring & support for all students  Promote positive & prevent negative peer interactions  Create a physical environment that is safe & conducive to teaching & learning  Establish social emotional& academic expectations that are clear, high reasonable & responsive to developmental cultural & individual differences  Establish predictable procedures & routines  Establish fair rules & consequences  Monitor student behavior frequently & respond quickly to early signs of misbehavior  Academic instruction & activities engage & motivate learning providing 20
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