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The Real Opportunities Of Virtual Worlds
 

The Real Opportunities Of Virtual Worlds

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    The Real Opportunities Of Virtual Worlds The Real Opportunities Of Virtual Worlds Presentation Transcript

    • The Real Opportunities of Virtual Worlds Jane M c Gonigal,PhD Researcher ~ Game Designer
    • Goals
      • Getting real about the opportunities in virtual worlds – why become immersed?
      • A “ long zoom ” on virtual worlds – how do we define them now, and how might we define them differently in the future?
      • The larger landscape – alternate approaches to virtual worldness
      • Future learning - innovation skills and abilities emerging from virtual worlds
      • Discussion; Q & A
    • Part I
      • Getting real about opportunities in virtual worlds – why become immersed?
      • Choosing to become immersed in a specific virtual world is a major investment: it means buying in to someone else’s framework.
        • New rules of engagement
        • Non-negotiable interactive limits
        • A particular visual style and content
        • Social conventions and other players
      • Why accept a new, external framework? Why would an individual, or group, or organization choose to become immersed in the new limitations of a virtual world?
      Why Virtual Worlds?
      • Early explorers and recent observers often focus on the “irrational” appeal of virtual worlds. We share vague notions about:
        • the power of immersion
        • “ fun”
        • “ novelty” and “cutting-edge”
        • “ community”, and so on.
      • But virtual worlds are now engrained enough in global culture to start talking about their rational appeal and specific powers.
      Why Virtual Worlds?
    • Why Virtual Worlds?
      • How do we explain the mass migration to second lives, simulated environments, and alternate realities?
      • As we move beyond novelty vague hopes, we can adopt a more utilitarian way of thinking about virtual worlds.
      • Given a specific context, goal, user, or community, what can we hope to do better in a virtual world?
    • Why Virtual Worlds?
      • Better Sociability – communications, sense of social connection, and community are improved
    • Why Virtual Worlds?
      • Better Visualization – new opportunities for navigation, sense making, visual expression
    • Why Virtual Worlds?
      • Better Dynamics – more easily and vividly observed impact, better coordination, more engagement, more clearly understood opportunities, more power, more pleasure
    • Why Virtual Worlds?
      • Better Sociability – communications, sense of social connection and community are improved
      • Better Navigation – new opportunities for sense making, discovering and exposing meaning
      • Better Dynamics – more easily and vividly observed impact, better coordination, more engagement, more clearly understood opportunities, more power, more pleasure
      • The decision to move any part of traditional business or team building to virtual worlds should be oriented toward maximizing one or more of these benefits.
    • Part II
      • A “ long zoom ” on virtual worlds – how do we define them now, and how might we define them differently in the future?
    • Goals
      • Virtual worlds are persistent, immersive environments that are inhabited, explored, and acted in by their users.
    • Cory Ondrejka suggests:
      • A virtual world is a place that allow many simultaneous users to experience consistency, persistence, complex player interactions and many forms of player expression.
      • - Consistency allows players to predict the consequences of their actions - Persistence means that players’ actions have meaning over longer time periods than their individual sessions - Complex interactions include communication, combat, and trade - Players expression includes avatar and environmental customization, their behavior in-game (including griefing), role playing
    • What is the “ long zoom” trajectory of virtual experience?
      • Virtual Reality (1990s) …
      • Virtual Worlds (2000s) …
      • Alternate Realities (2010s) …
    • What is the “ long zoom” trajectory of virtual experience?
      • Virtual Reality sensory immersion
          • Virtual Worlds social, algorithmic immersion
              • Alternate Realities data, network immersion
      • 7 Dimensions of Virtual Worlds
      • In the next decade, we will witness explosive variation and diversification in the purpose, platform, and experiential aspects of virtual worlds.
      • 1. What is the purpose?
      • 2. What kind of interface?
      • 3. How do users interact with each other?
      • 4. Who produces the content?
      • 5. Is it fiction or non-fiction?
      • 6. Does it reference real space, or not?
      • 7. Is the experience in or out of place?
      • 7 Dimensions of Virtual Worlds
      • In the next decade, we will witness explosive variation and diversification in the purpose, platform, and experiential aspects of virtual worlds.
      • Social, Communications  Gaming, Productivity
      • 3D Graphical Environment  Everyday Information Environment
      • Synchronous Experience  Asynchronous Experience
      • Content Consumption  Content Creation
      • “ Accurate” data (informative)  “Fantastic” (mythological)
      • Geo-referential (real world)  Sui generis geography
      • Out of place (context-blind)   In place (context aware)
    • Part III
      • The larger landscape – alternate approaches to virtual worldness
    • Security Challenges
    • “ Cognitive Load”
    •  
    • Alternate Approaches
      • Asynchronous virtual worlds
        • example: CyWorld
      • Virtual economies without the mythology
        • example: Seriosity’s Attent
      • Non-graphical virtual worlds
        • example: World Without Oil
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    • Alternate Reality Fiction
      • “ Alternate reality fiction is a hybrid of Urban Fantasy and Alternate History... A genre that not only alters this world's history, but also its dynamics .”
      • - OED for Science Fiction
      • “ An a lternate reality is another — equally valid but not always attainable — way of experiencing existence.”
      • - G. S. ELRICK Sci. Fiction Handbk . 30, 1978
      Alternate Reality Fiction
      • “ If we're not bound by the same limitations , we can become aware of alternate realities.”
      • - L. TUTTLE Lost Futures 95, 1992
      Alternate Reality Fiction
      • “ When they returned, they discovered that … their excursion had created a new alternate reality .”
      • - G. A. EFFINGER in Isaac Asimov's Sci. Fiction Mag. Feb. 120, 1989
      Alternate Reality Fiction
    • Part IV
      • Future learning - innovation skills and abilities emerging from virtual worlds
    • Invitation Graphic Goes Here
    • Supersized – working at a new scale Superimposed – managing a hybrid scenario with both real and virtual elements Supercomputing – massively parallel efforts Superheroic – pursuing goals defined by the good the evolution of everyday superheroes:
    •  
    • Virtual World Powers for Real-World Innovation
      • Mobability Open Authorship
      • Influency Emergensight
      • Ping Quotient Longbroading
      • Multi-Capitalism Signal/Noise Management
      • Protovation
      • Cooperation Radar
    • Mobability
      • the ability to perform real-time work in large groups
      • a talent for organizing and collaborating with many people simultaneously
    • Influency
      • the ability to be persuasive in multiple social contexts and media spaces
      • an understanding that each context and space requires a different persuasive strategy and technique
    • Ping Quotient
      • measures your responsiveness to other people’s requests for engagement
      • your propensity and ability to reach out to others in a network
    • Multi-Capitalism
      • fluency in working with different capitals
      • natural, intellectual, social, financial, human, e.g.
    • Protovation
      • fearless innovation in rapid, iterative cycles
      • an understanding that the cost of short-term failure has been lowered
    • Open Authorship
      • ease and savvy in creating content for public, or open, consumption – through peer 2 peer citation, circulation, and modification
    • Emergensight
      • ability to prepare for and handle surprising results and complexity
    • Longbroading
      • thinking in terms of higher level systems, massively multiple cycles, and a much bigger picture
    • Signal/Noise Management
      • filtering meaningful info, patterns, and commonalities from the massively-multiple streams of data
    • Cooperation Radar
      • the ability to sense, almost intuitively, who would make the best collaborators on a particular task
    • Virtual World Powers for Real-World Innovation
      • Mobability Open Authorship
      • Influency Emergensight
      • Ping Quotient Longbroading
      • Multi-Capitalism Signal/Noise Management
      • Protovation
      • Cooperation Radar
    • Part V
      • Open Discussion,
      • Q & A