Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Current Practices by SPA Delhi

230

Published on

This presentation was prepared by SPA Delhi for "Anusandhaana" - XV Annual NOSPlan Convention …

This presentation was prepared by SPA Delhi for "Anusandhaana" - XV Annual NOSPlan Convention

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
230
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Current Practices XV Annual NOSPlan Convention Theme : Safe Cities „Community – led Disaster Risk Management‟ Case Study of Rajiv Gandhi Nagar (Dharavi), Mumbai A project done in collaboration of Global Center of Excellence, Human Security Engineering (GCOE-HSE) Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University, Japan + School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi , India Participants: + Municipal Corporation of greater Mumbai , Mumbai, India Aditya Ajith Amit Kumar Shefali Parashar Malvika Rautela Mayank Parmar Saneera Dev School of Planning and Architecture New Delhi
  • 2. Introduction Community – led Disaster Risk Management Safe Cities Crime Prevention Disaster Management IDRiM – Integrated Disaster Risk Management CLDRM – Community – led Disaster Risk Management School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi Current Practices
  • 3. Introduction Community – led Disaster Risk Management Difference between Community – “based” DRR and Community – “led” DRR Community Based Conventional approach in Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) – involves community in passive manner – inputs used as suggestions & guidelines. Final decisions are taken by external expert or local government ; largely driven by the interest and intentions of the external stakeholders than the actual affected community. Emphasis mainly on disaster response rather than risk mitigation and disaster preparedness. Community Led “Bringing the vulnerable communities together and beginning a new spirit towards being proactive to disaster risk and make them more and more self dependent while achieving resiliency” School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi Current Practices
  • 4. Introduction Community – led Disaster Risk Management Collaborative Effort Disaster risk reduction efforts, to be effective at local level has to be based on a strong „bottom-up‟ approach Technical Support Technical Experts Academicians Administrative Experts Use of innovative methods to facilitate the vulnerable community people to directly involve in planning and implementation processes. Aspects namely risk perception, vulnerability assessment, risk communication and planning methods and systems for risk reduction have to be main focus of the community representatives. Community NGOs (for mobilization and innovation) School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi Current Practices
  • 5. Introduction Community – led Disaster Risk Management Lead Actor : Community Direct involvement of community in each step of analysis of community vulnerability and status, risk perception and taking decisions about actions toward risk The Technical agency involved shall help the community to augment their awareness and scientific knowledge through introduction of appropriate techniques by bringing experts, academicians, government officials, civil defence etc. to interact with them. An understanding of the scientific processes should be developed by the community helping them to take decisions rationally by themselves The community itself shall list out all the necessary actions to be taken for risk reduction with the necessary help of technical and administrative agencies. School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi Current Practices
  • 6. Case Study Community – led Disaster Risk Management Introduction to Rajiv Gandhi Nagar, Dharavi, Mumbai School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi Current Practices
  • 7. Case Study Community – led Disaster Risk Management Introduction to Rajiv Gandhi Nagar, Dharavi, Mumbai Mangrove forests converted into squatter settlement by migrants and labourers Area : 4 ha Population families) : Predominantly character 13000 (2200 residential Duration of stay: 30 years School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi Current Practices
  • 8. Participatory Tools & Techniques Applied Community – led Disaster Risk Management Open-ended interviews with Key Informants (along with more than 1000 questionnaire based household surveys) Town Watching, Field Notes & Problem identification Group Discussions (10 exhibitions of findings, maps, photos in Mumbai & Delhi) Content Analysis- Selected Surveys & Data processing Participatory Risk Mapping & vulnerability Zoning SWOT analysis for Capability Status & Potential ‘Yonmenkaigi’ exercise for problem solving Interactive workshops with community leaders and other stakeholders (08 Participatory Workshops in Japan, Mumbai & Delhi with strong involvement of Community Leaders) School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi Current Practices
  • 9. Participatory Tools & Techniques Applied Observation Technique Community – led Disaster Risk Management Interviews and Discussions School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi Current Practices
  • 10. Participatory Tools & Techniques Applied Community – led Disaster Risk Management Map prepared with the help of the community leaders Participatory Risk Mapping with community Leaders School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi Current Practices
  • 11. Participatory Tools & Techniques Applied Rajiv Gandhi Nagar – Distribution of Houses According to Building Materials Community – led Disaster Risk Management Rajiv Gandhi Nagar – Distribution of Houses According to Normal Water Logging during Rains Similar maps were prepared for Distribution of Houses based on Actual Evacuation – 2005, July Disaster; Distribution of Houses According to Self-estimated Total Monitory Loss 2005 , July Disaster; etc. using participatory mapping School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi Current Practices
  • 12. Participatory Tools & Techniques Applied S W Community – led Disaster Risk Management O School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi T Current Practices
  • 13. Action Plan Community – led Disaster Risk Management FLOOD Rehabilitation and Preparedness RECONSTRUCTION Response Relief School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi Current Practices
  • 14. Action Plan Process Community – led Disaster Risk Management Actions community can perform mobilizing local resources & without external help Actions that need city government help clearly identified and dealt separately. Allocation of responsibility for actions among the community leaders / champions & volunteers. Translation of actions on to the ground conditions – nodal points, signboards, notice boards, information dissemination, place for rescue and relief material , evacuation routes etc. This process has been applied on all the 4 stages of Disaster Management, viz, Response, Relief, Reconstruction and Rehabilitation. 2 of these aspects are demonstrated in the coming slides (due to time constraint) School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi Current Practices
  • 15. Action Plan – Rescue/ Response Community – led Disaster Risk Management Actors and Responsibilities Priority List of Actions for Rescue Operation 1 To summon all volunteers to come forward to rescue people in emergency 3 To Identify risky spots where the rescue team may need to go on priority basis. 4 To rescue disabled, injured, elderly people 5 To provide and distribute the list of contents of survival kits in community 6 To appeal people to carry their “survival kit” and “first-aid” box 7 To appeal people to carry their “vital documents” , specially various identity card during evacuation 8 To prepare “Life-Jacket” using locally available materials, example plastic bottles, plastics bags. 9 To prepare boats made by locally available materials, examples drums, wooden plates etc. to rescue disabled , elderly and injured persons. 10 To collaborate and appeal Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai and NGOs to provide floating boats to rescue people if necessary. 11 To provide First-aid treatment 12 What the Community can do with External Help Index : priority of actions To Identify local young member from clubs, religious place, political parties to provide voluntary support to rescue people 2 What the Community Can Do To use sniffing dogs for locating trapped people under debris Immediate Priority Intermediate Priority Remote Priority Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai (MCGM) Civil Defence NGOs GCOE –HSE and other Academic Institutes Core Action Group School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi Chawl Committee Religious, Cultural and Political Group Community volunteers Current Practices
  • 16. Action Plan Community – led Disaster Risk Management Index : List of Actors Core Action Group Chawl Committee Religious, Cultural and Political Group Community volunteers Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai (MCGM) Civil Defence NGOs GCOE –HSE and other Academic Institutes Flood level – 2005, Rajiv Gandhi Nagar Index : priority of actions Immediate Priority Intermediate Priority Remote Priority School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi Current Practices
  • 17. Action Plan - Relief Community – led Disaster Risk Management Actors and Responsibilities Priority List of Actions :Relief for Affected People 1 To ensure the access to those building during flood emergency 3 To mark the temporary shelter with “S” letter for easy finding and locating 4 To use loudspeakers to update the stages of improvements of flood situation and relief operation 5 To provide medicine to evacuees in free of cost 6 To set up community kitchen and provide foods and dirking 7 To set up temporary and mobile toilets and maintain it by local volunteers. 8 To provide extra support to elderly, women and children during their stay in shelters. 9 To promote higher sense of hygiene among the residence during emergency 10 What the Community can do with External Help To indentify adjacent school, office buildings, public building for temporary shelters 2 What the Community Can Do To set up specially trained “women group” to provide trauma care wherever necessary during disaster. School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi Current Practices
  • 18. Action Plan Community – led Disaster Risk Management Core Action Group Chawl Committee Religious, Cultural and Political Group Community volunteers Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai (MCGM) Civil Defence NGOs GCOE –HSE and other Academic Institutes Evacuation Status @ Rajiv Gandhi Nagar in 2005 Index : priority of actions Immediate Priority Intermediate Priority Remote Priority School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi Current Practices
  • 19. Positive Outputs Community – led Disaster Risk Management Change of attitude of City Government from ONLY ‘Hardware’ engineering solutions for disaster management to ‘Software’ and ‘ Human-ware’ solutions accepting the critical role communities can play. Grass-root level flood safety management- Enhancement of Community Capability toward higher Self- Efficacy & Collective-Efficacy. Facilitation of Sustainable community leadership through better identity and operability. Improved advocacy & bargaining power of the community. Community-led Disaster Management Participatory Action Plan , Actual implementation of small but quickly implementable actions by the community & preparation of a booklet for publication by GCOE HSE. School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi Current Practices
  • 20. Acknowledgment Community – led Disaster Risk Management THANK YOU FOR YOUR PATIENCE We would like to sincerely thank Prof. B. Mishra for lending his support for providing with relevant material and guidance for understanding the process of CLDRM. We would also like to acknowledge the relentless work of GCOE – HSE, Kyoto University, SPA Delhi and MCGM. It would be incomplete without acknowledging the efforts of the Local community of Dharavi whose relentless struggle has made this endeavour worthwhile. School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi Current Practices

×