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When Information Matters - from System of Record to System of Engagement

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The consumerization of enterprise IT is changing the way organizations use, consume, control and share information. The focus of IT is changing from a traditional focus on standardizing and automating …

The consumerization of enterprise IT is changing the way organizations use, consume, control and share information. The focus of IT is changing from a traditional focus on standardizing and automating back-end manual processes – a focus on control – to a focus on empowering and connecting knowledge workers and improving knowledge worker productivity and innovation. AIIM's (Association for Information and Image Management) market research has identified what this means for organizations and their future requirements for managing enterprise information. Learn how you can leverage information to  transform your business.

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  • 1215-1300The consumerization of enterprise IT is changing the way organizations use, consume, control and share information. The focus of IT is changing from a traditional focus on standardizing and automating back-end manual processes – a focus on control – to a focus on empowering and connecting knowledge workers and improving knowledge worker productivity and innovation. AIIM's (Association for Information and Image Management) market research has identified what this means for organizations and their future requirements for managing enterprise information. Learn how you can leverage information to  transform your business.STORY ABOUT THE INVENTOR OF THE CHESS GAME….I DON’T HAVE ALL THE QUESTIONS, but AT LEAST SOME OF THE QUESTIONS….My name is AtleSkjekkeland….COO of the industry assocation AIIMOppvokst I Bo I telemarkogKvinesdali Vest agderFor aagjorehverdagenmer complex: Kona mi erfraindonesia, med portugisisk….`WARNING: A lof of english terms… This is going to be a problem for me.
  • 1216 And who is AIIM?AIIM is the global community for information professionalsFounded in 194380,000 active community membersOur research and task forces identify and analyze trends and opportunities in the ECM (or information management) industryForbes Magazine called our research with author Geoffrey Moore the "Best social media idea of 2011”AIIM published last year #OccupyIT – a manifesto about how business leaders must reclaim ITAIIM is a also leading provider of training and B2B marketing servicesVisit www.aiim.orgQ: Any AIIM members in the room?
  • 1217 Going to share a lot of research – you can download all this for free from www.aiim.org/resaerch You just have to register.
  • 1218 Will address 3 things in my keynote:The 50,000 Foot Context – An Industry at an Inflection PointThe Reality on the Ground – Not as Easy as it SeemsThe Critical Role of Content Management
  • 1219 We are experiencing a tidal wave of information. The digital universe is growing exponentially, and we need a new plan for how to deal with this.And many organizations are not ready for this…. As probably the Native Americans said when they saw Columbus; Dude, I am so not prepared for this.Per IDC: we will by 2020 have 44 times more information in the world – and most of this will be unstructured.Per Fortune, by 2020, Internet connected devices will grow from 400 million today to 50 billionThese devices will be talking to each other and to the internet. It means your cat, plants, and clothes will have an IP address….By 2020, it is also predicted that our smart phones will have the capability of storing and accessing as much information as IBM’s Watson and supercomputers can.
  • 1220 Enter Content Management - Content management combines analytics, collaboration, governance and processes with anywhere, anytime access to deliver value to your customers, partners, and employees. Use content management to improve staff engagement, ensure compliance, and automate processes.Content Management is as a versatile as the animal you see on the screen. This is a “EierlegendeWollmilchsau”, which is German for "egg-laying wool-milk-sow”. It is a metaphorical term for someone or something that is extremely versatile, as would be an animal with the capabilities of a cow (milk)a sheep (wool production)a chicken (eggs)and a pig (meat)There are many types of content management applications – web content management, document management, imaging, records management, etc. Use content management to…Allow staff to work together on documents, e.g. proposal, contractPut a process in place for producing or collaborating on content, e.g. new hire process, pay invoices.Manage a large website where customers can access up to date informationCapture and manage electronic records Etc.
  • 1221 But the Content Management industry is changing, we started therefore a few years ago a project to define the future of this industry with best selling author Geoffrey Moore. Moore is a best-selling author of technology books like “Inside the Tornado” and “Crossing the Chasm”.
  • 1222 One thing that came out of this project; the history of enterprise IT in one slide-slide.We had the mainframe era from 1960-75 where we typically managed batch transactions. Our industry was all about microfilm.Then we had the mini computer era from 75 to 1992 with image management.This was followed by the PC era from 1992 to 2001 with Imaging evolving to Document Management for managing electronic documents, not only images.This then evolved into Content Management around 2001 for managing documents, records, images, and web content. The term Enterprise Content Management was born to describe the suite of solutions for managing content.We are now in the social and cloud era where our focus is moving from content to interactions.One way to summarize this is to say that the Internet era was all about connecting devices – this era is all about connecting people in addition to the devices. It’s about collaboration, it’s about staff and customer engagement.Most IT investment used to be around System of Record. It was about managing business process to enable eCommerce, and to get management data to executives. The focus on ERP and CRM systems is an excellent example of this.Now we are seeing a shift in focus from System of Record to System of Engagement. Organizations want a to better engage customers and provide knowledge workers with better tools. The focus on Microsoft SharePoint is a good examples of this.Please note that System of Record is still a multibillion dollar industry, its just that the priorities have shifted.
  • 1223 There is another way of looking at Systems of Record and Systems of Engagement.Interestingly enough, this model is also one of Geoffrey Moore’s. Internally, we refer to it constantly as we talk about the changes going on in this industry. We call it the two humps model.
  • 1224 Let me start by explaining the model. It shows the sweet-spots in IT – where do you want to be to maximize your opportunities and revenues. The X-axis shows number of customers or users per system, the Y-axis level of effectiveness or how well you address their needs.The left of the market is about complexity – it is often used by less than 20% of staffMost of the IT spend is used to get the solution liveSome would even say that this part of the market is really good job security for IT people.Most large content management solutions are implemented in just one department or process – too expensive for all to use it, with perhaps the exception of SharePoint.The right market is about volume – it is often used by 80% of staffIt is solutions that are easy to implement and use – you can be up and running in a few hoursBusiness people love this – it’s a way to improve their IT capabilities at low costIt is easy to implement, and most investments happen over the lifecycle of the solutions, e.g. professional services, premium features, extra storage, scanners.Most implementations are done to solve a business problem, e.g. share large files with customers, and then viral adoption leads soon to an enterprise license.
  • 1225 Enterprise Content Management used to be about big problems and big solutions/Many of the large providers fight over large deals for large enterprises with complex requirements. This is how it started for Documentum with Drug Applications…Success was measured in how expensive and long an IT project was…. Good job security for IT professionals!Toby Bell in Gartner said some years ago that 50% of organizations that spend less than 6 months on procuring a content management system will fail….Studies conducted by Doculabs and others have shown that more than 50 percent of content management implementations are failures – projects that either went over budget, or over time, or that achieved adoption rates that were dismally lower than the initial projections.Why do so many content management implementations fail to deliver the expected benefits?Most organizations still take an overly tactical view toward content managementThey don’t prioritize effective planning from a strategic standpoint on how to realize returns on the investment.
  • 1226 Around the mid 2000s, we started seeing some changes in the left hump. Specifically, we started to see the left hump shifting to the right, offering dramatically different price points for enterprise systems and opening up enterprise scale capabilities to companies and organizations for whom it previously had been just a dream.In the document and content space, enter SharePoint in 2007. SharePoint came into the content space not even using the C word, instead focused on extending Microsoft’s Office and Exchange franchise into the knowledge worker space. Price points changed dramatically and suddenly we were no longer talking about content systems that might touch 5% of our workers, but systems that might touch 95%.Why was SharePoint successful…Promoted and implemented via IT depts, sidetracking biz ownersGave users the idea that they could handle their own dataUsers liked the user interface – WHICH TELLS YOU SOMETHING ABOUT HOW BAD THE ALTERNATIVES WHERE….And our research just released last week:33 percent of respondents said they are struggling with their SharePoint implementation, and 28 percent say that progress has stalled altogether. At the same time, 40 percent are moving forward with implementations but only 6 percent describe their implementation as a great success. By the way, the picture shows my daughter Isabelle in front of her pet Bruce…
  • 1227 In the broader enterprise space, it is hard to underestimate the impact of Salesforce building credibility for SaaS (read: Saas) solutions and the cloud. Even organizations that say they would “never” store business critical information in the cloud report back – oblivious to the contradiction – that they use Saleforce.
  • 1228 And while this was going on in the enterprise, there was a revolution in consumer technologies.3 driving forces: #1: Social.People now spend more time on Facebook than Google96% of 18-35 year-olds are on a social network in the US34% of bloggers post opinions about products and brands78% of consumers trust peer recommendations, while only 14% trust advertisementRefusing to communicate with customers via social channels will soon be as harmful as ignoring emails and phone class is todayThe Internet is providing a means for anyone connected to re-enter such a virtual marketplace and once again achieve such a level of communication between people. It took years before cable company COMCAST GOT this. For example: if you go to YouTube….Some organizations have realized this is a huge opportunity….Barry Judge, CMO of Best Buy, mastered this when he provided the environment in which Web staffer Ben Hedrington and marketer John Bernier could create Twelpforce, Best Buy’s 2,500-person strong Twitter help force
  • 1229 And as social usage continues to grow personally – the more professional it becomes.Or as Tony Zingale put it;“Why is it that I know more about what my High School girlfriend had for dinner than what is going on in my organization?”When we ask our members: “I expect to use the same type of networking tools with my business colleagues as I do with my friends and family.”Network building with known and unknown business colleagues.Finding expertise, people and networksResearch / feedback from wider stakeholder groupsWe are now trying to use social technologies responsibly to better collaborate and to drive employee, customer and partner engagementAnd if this is not enough… New generations of workers have different expectationsThe graph shows: Number of people born in the US on the X-axis, Over years on the Y-axisThese new workers will expect the same type of social networking tools within their organization as they have with friends and family
  • 1230 Second factor in the consumer IT revolution is Mobile.Estimated that 4.2bn people with toothbrushes, 5.1bn people with cell phones.We have new sets of devices and smart phonesWe use phones to launch processes and generate geographically tagged informationWe have a new class of content consumption devicesThey are always on, always improving, and always connected to the internet and to the cloud – UNLESS YOU ARE AN AT&T CUSTOMER….An iPhone is more powerful than all IT devices in Apollo rockets that went to the moon…. And by 2020 they will be smarter then that won Jepardy.And you have seen nothing yet… We are expecting the 2nd, 3rd, 4th,…. mobile revolution!BUT ALSO NEW MOBILE HABITS; We check out cell phones 150 times per day / we check them every six and half minute The website ChaCha interviewed 1,500 teens and young adults about their media habits.If forced to pick one device, 61% would take phone, 18% the computer68% of teens said their favorite way to communicate was text messages, vs 10% phone callsUK research by Zeldi in the UK among 1,000 mothers and mobile; 12% admit to having used their mobile phone while having sex; this is similar to earlier finding by Retrovo that 10% of UK youth send text messages during sex…
  • 1231 Mobile changes the game by providing better access, direct accessThe picture is from Daytona 500 when all cars have to stop on the track due to an accident – and one driver shared pictures and tweeted from his carI stopped paying attention to the TV – my iPhone took over as the best way to follow the race. And imagine if the driver had the iPhone app from LiveStream.com – and it is free Or iSwivl that tracks movement automatically for $179….Changing how people shop;According to Pew research: 28% of cell owners used their phone while inside a store to look up reviews of a product to help decide if they should purchase it or not.27% of cell owners used their phone while inside a store to look up the price of a product, to see if they could get a better price elsewhere.
  • 1232 Third factor in the consumer IT revolution is Cloud Computing.Question: Any one remember WordPerfect? What happened to them? The platform changed from DOS to Windows – and they didn’t change fast enough to the new platform.When the platform for music shifted from record stores to iTunes, the power shifted too, and many labels were crushed.Or buying books from Borders to Amazon…?Or renting DVDs from BlockBuster to Netflix…?The move to the Cloud is a platform change…Biz execs are adoption the cloud 2.5x faster then IT people – it’s the consumerization of enterprise IT. THEY DON”T CARE ABOUT THE CLOUD, JUST WHAT IT REPRESENT.An internal IT dept may end up like Borders and Blockbuster if they don’t change
  • 1233 Need to do something? There is an app for that available from the cloud….Zombie Run app for exerciseWine to sold out (WTSO) for good wine at a low price over the internetUber for limo serviceHuman to Cat app for getting my daughters cat to comeTile for finding stuff…It’s either free or costs just a few bucks. Its awesome If you don’t like, get rid of it. And it takes 30 sec to install, not the usual 6 months by our internal IT dept. The effect according to Forrester: 50% of staff they now think they have better tech at home then in the office.
  • 1234 and when you combine Mobile, social and cloud;This is Isabelle, our 8 year old daugter. She is a digital native, here seen playing with her analog Angry Birds.She uses my iphone and theAction Movie FX app to create small action movies – let me show you one with our cat Stella….
  • 1235 The revolution in consumer IT impacts is happening in the right hump, but this is also impacting the left hump. We have over the last years seen content management apps like DropBox, Box.net, Yammer, Wordpress, Google Docs.And voila, the right hump began sliding to the left as companies on the consumer side realized that if they were going to build a non-advertising revenue model, they needed to begin move into the enterprise. Also players from the MFP and copier space entered, coming from a perspective of basic document management and workflow, essentially file cabinets in the cloudAnd a new model began to emerge. A content space with millions rather than thousands of potential customers, the dethroning of IT, with an emphasis on simplicity rather than complexity, and a focus on operational expenses (OPEX) rather than capital expenses (CAPEX).Neither model is right or wrong.
  • 1236 That was the big picture, - lets now address the realities on the ground. It’s not as easy as it may seem.
  • 1237 First issues is conflicting revenue models. This shows the traditional revenue model for left hump companies. Most of the budget was spent getting an IT solution up and running. Think about a typical 2 million spend.A lot of this is for software and hardware, but also 2-10x in professional services. You then spent around 20% in annual maintenance fees before spending more money on upgrades every 3-5 years.
  • 1238 And on the right side….Providers of Consumer IT apps use completely different revenue model. They use freemium models with just a few customers paying for additional features and functions. They use try-before-you-buy to get you to love the solution before committing. Most of the spend is usually happens after the solution is live. Think of Apple iPhone – you may have spent some money getting the phone, but a lot more is usually spent on micro-apps and services.So that is the first new reality in the world of Systems of Record and Systems of Engagement. Vendors – and users – need to decide whether they are playing in the land of CAPEX (Read: Cap-ex) or the land of OPEX (Read: Op-Ex), and those in the land of CAPEX (Read: Cap-Ex) need to realize that the pressure in slowly but surely heading in the direction of OPEX (Read: Op-Ex).Still, While the premium to freemium model of deployment has been successful for some companies looking to enter the enterprise content and process market, for most companies this is just noise.
  • 1239 Second reality is that the core characteristics of doing business in the opposite hump tend to bleed over into your hump, because most customers have no idea there are even any humps out there. They are just trying to solve a business problem.Here’s the tension. Cloud software from the Volume side can be deployed with the ease of a clickthrough puts power in the hands of individual users to end-run their own IT departments. Often the CIO does not even know this is going on. Fast forward a few months, and the cloud vendor meets with the CIO and reports that 427 end users in the organization are customers, and notes, “You should really upgrade from the free level to the enterprise level so that you at least have administrative privileges.
  • 1240 The third reality is there is a lot of confusion about what exactly is the content management industry these days.Of course, this isn’t a new problem… successive waves of innovation, microfilm, imaging, document management and workflow, and content management.One thing is sure: Enterprise Content Management is changing.ENTERPRISEBecoming:MobileGlobalOpenEngagedAgileAdaptiveAnd the content is complex, viewed as an asset; source of advantage. Its just not just management anymore – it’s also open collaborative, social, flexible and inclusive.
  • 1241 Reality #4: There is a huge hap between system of record and system of engagementMobile, Social, and Cloudtechnologies are at the heart of Systems of Engagement, and critical to the linkages – or lack thereof – between System of Record and System of Engagement. It’s important to remember that mobile is still in its early stages.Let me give you an example: This is my boss John Mancini. He has been a customer of the same bank for 20 years – therefore expected no problems refinancing. Systems of Record –processes that are standardized, repeatable, predictable, content-intense – do not go away as we move into the world of Systems of Engagement. But as we make this migration, gaps emerge. New challenges emerge – what happens when you combine a system of engagement with a system of record?
  • 1242 Reality #5: New Skills Required.Numbered are the days of the Gestapo IT department that require you to only stuff they approve and support. It’s a new world out there.IT was a lot about cost reduction, now it is about creating value.Complexity was job security, not it is about simple and smartIT was a railroad builder, now it is more like a taxi company. It needs to take this place today, and another place tomorrow. We need it now, not in 6 months.Most spending was cap ex, now its op ex.We are also seeing an increased tension between the business and IT, is reflected in these data points from a recent survey by the Harvard Business Review and The Economistabout what CEOs think about their own CIOs: Almost half of CEOs rate their CIOs negatively in terms of understanding the business and understanding how to apply IT in new ways to the business. 57% of CEOs expect their IT function to change significantly over the next three years and 12% predict the complete overhaul of IT. Almost half of CEOs feel IT should be a commodity service purchased only as needed.Or as one of our members said it: CIO now stands for Career is Over.But the reality is that right now, the majority of the MONEY is on the left side. In 3-5 years, the majority of the money will be on the right side. But how quickly?
  • 1243 One last thing about skillsets: We have over the last few years seen a growing debate about the need for new skillsets from end-users (like BP), vendors and analysts (like Gartner and Forrester)…Deb Logan and Regina Casonata from Gartner published a few years ago a report called “CIO Alert: You Need Information Professionals”I quote: “Professional roles focused on information management will be different to that of established IT roles….An "information professional" will not be one type of role or skill set, but will in fact have a number of specializations.” The industry association AIIM started therefore to define a body of knowledge for this new information professionals, which is now available in new Certified Information Professional program. For more information visit www.aiim.org
  • 1244 Lets then look at the implications of all this and the opportunities this brings to you.
  • 1245 Opportunity #1: Connect SOR and SOE to capitalize on Content – treat information as an asset“There will be an incomprehensible, mind-explodingly massive expansion in the amount of information floating around.”This is going to be a challenge for us in SOR, but also an opportunity when connecting SOR and SOE.Let me give you a few examples.
  • 1246 “I don’t have an information overload problem, I have a filter problem” said bestselling author Clay Shirky. Ensure you create these filters.So one of the studies we did last year, we asked both users and non-users of a number of different ECM technologies what % improvements they had seen, or might expect to see. I’ve deliberately written out these questions longhand so that you can see they are, to an extent, aspirational, but see what you think. When we asked:“What productivity or staff engagement factor would you put on the ability to share opinions, find expertise, answer questions and communicate activities via staff blogs, micro-blogs, social sites and other Enterprise 2.0 technologies?”18.2% more productive (average)This is similar to other research in this area. According to Towers Watson, companies with a highly engaged workforce improved operating income by 19.2% over a period of 12 months, while those companies with low engagement scores saw operating income decline by 32.7% over the same period.
  • 1247 Second thing: Improve Collaboration – this could be structured collaboration to more information collaboration.We asked:“In terms of timescales or project costs by what factor would you say a collaborative, widely accessible team-site environment can (or has) improved project delivery in your organization?” 24.9% faster (average)
  • 1248 Third: Process Automation: “How much more productive do you think the administrative staff in your organization would be (or are) if their processes were work-flowed, using scanned forms and documents, with automated data capture?”33.5% more productive (averageThe picture is from LA, where one hospital put scanners in every ambulance… If you are into process automation – remember to check out the new AIIM training course for Profess Improvement - Learn how to map, standardize, mobilzie, and automate processes.
  • 1249 And from System of Engagement to System of Record: Fourth question: “How much can/could you reduce legal costs, fines and damagesif you applied best practice procedures to records management, security and e-Discovery?”25% reduced costs.The picture is the winner of our “Messiest Desk” competition a few years ago….The winner of the Messiest Desk Photo Competition and recipient of the Kodak Scanmate i1120 Scanner is Brian Pillard, who is Records Manager for Lancaster County Nebraska. He has repeatedly stressed that "This isn't my desk," so I definately wanted to make that clear. (Whether he shares the prize with Steve or not is his decision.)The desk in question belongs to Steve Hubka, City of Lincoln, Nebraska Budget Director. Apparently, yesterday word got out to the Mayor's office that Steve's desk had won the contest. Brian shares the following proclamation with us: Sept 14th has been named Steve Hubka Messy Desk Day.
  • 1250 Fifth: Mobilize Information How much would it improve (or have you improved) the efficiency of your office staff by giving them sufficientremote or mobile access to company information that they are able to efficiently work from home or on-the-road? 25%Q: Who telework?IBM used to stand for I’ve Been Moved. It now stands for I’m By Myself since 40% of the workforce does not have an office.Even higher for AIIM – most of our staff are only in the office 1 day every week – the rest they work from home, starbucks, or similarThink about: Many office workers commute 2 hours every day to an office to sit in front a computer or on the phone – why?So let me give you a couple of data points about how young professionals in the workplace view mobility and flexibility and social technologies from a Cisco report.45% of young professionals would accept a lower paying job with more flexibility rather than a higher-paying job with less.30% of young professionals feel that the ability to work remotely with a flexible schedule is a "right.”
  • 1251 Sixth: Information FindabilityHow much more productive do you think professional staff in your organization would be (or are) if they could find internal information and documents as quickly and as easily as they find information on the web?30.9% more productive (average)Now this one peaks between 25 and 50%, and then keeps going a bit from there.
  • 1252 And Lastly: Improve Customers’ Access to Information“By how much do you think customer service levels and response times could be (or have been) improved if all of your customer-facing staff could immediately access and share all of the customer related and case-related information that you hold.”31.2% more responsive (average)According to Gallup research, fully engaged customers generate a 23% premium in terms of share of wallet, profitability, revenue, and relationship growth.The picture shows how Walgreen has mobilized how customers can print document at their locations…
  • 1254 Lorrie Luellig summarizes quite well in CIO Insights the goal of an information governance program:Manage all information, not just recordsConnect legal, privacy and regulatory retention obligations to relevant informationRetention periods must take into account the business value of information in addition to legal and compliance valueIdentify where information is locatedEnsure that retention and disposal obligations are communicated and publicized in a language that stakeholders can understandAllow for flexibility to adapt to local laws, obligations and limitationsInclude a mechanism that allows legal and IT to collaborate in executing and terminating legal holdsIdentify and eliminate duplicate informationUpdate in real time to account for changes in laws, to business and in technologyYou can learn more about this in the new AIIM training course for Information Governance..
  • 1255 When we ask our members about the risks of poor information governance…#1 Excess litigation costs (54%)#2 Bad publicity or customer confidence (42%)#3 Loss of IP or confidential company info (38%) Risk of criminal prosecution: 12%
  • 1256 – AND THE BENEFITS?67% of organizations expect reduced storage and infrastructure costs as the biggest benefit of an information governance program, but you need to identify the business drivers for your organization.Many organizations also expect improved efficiency and effectiveness. Here is an example from our friends at Doculabs of an organization that started to better manage information over its lifecycle including getting rid of information.They found with the help of analytics that 20% of information was unnecessary. 8% were records; 28% were non-records, but of business value.44% were “temporary documents” that could then be deleted after 3 years.Conclusion: They could immediately get rid of 20% saving them $2.5 million per year in storage expense.Given the results, $2.5 million in storage expense could be saved annually on the disposition ofhistoric content, resulting in $12.5 million over 5 yearsGoing forward with newly created content, if similar techniques are applied, the saving grows to $34.8 million over 5 years when the mount of information grows by 30% per year. That’s $34.8 millions over 5 years!
  • 1257 Opportunity #3: Leverage Analytics to connect SOR and SOEThe picture shows Santa Cruz Police Department using predictive policing — deploying officers in places where crimes are likely to occur in the future. This is mostly structured information, but it can also be…(1) A hospital using big data linked to social media to diagnose aPatient(2) Security department using big data to identify risks(3) For marketers to monitor what people think about their brands andquickly react to changes/campaigns by competitors
  • 1257 Paul Otellini, CEO at Intel was recently asked by Charlie Rose:“What is going to be obsolete next? Imagine our founding fathers learnt that we would have a device in our pocket that could help us answer almost any question, e.g. how far is earth from the sun, where do I find most great white sharks, what is the weather in Moscow.And we use it most of the time to check what are friends are doing… 
  • 1258 And for content management: Use analytics to reduce the volume of content by getting rid of things that doesn’t have any value. Use the same technologies for day-forward hygiene. Don’t be a digital hoarder.Analytics are often more accurate than humans. There’s a joke in information management that goes, “Ask 10 information management professionals to classify something and you’ll get 11 different answers.” Numerous studies have shown that the typical accuracy rate for reasonably consistent content is 60-90%; with humans it’s often 50% of less. Recommendations:Provide employees with explicit guidance for the acceptable use of available tools for dynamic content and their associated retention periods For example, retain non-records for three years, retain official records per the retention scheduleInitiate ILG practices on a “day-forward” basis first, so any new content created or saved is assigned a disposition periodDisposition horizons should begin to influence behavior on where content begins to be stored (as users discover that those materials saved in the “wrong” system will be purged)For historical content, analyze the feasibility of content analytics and auto-classificationRecognize that “cleaning up” terabytes of content can take years. So conduct the analysis in 2012, begin the clean-up effort in earnest by 2013, and eliminate a large portion of dated content by 2015
  • 1259 Consumer tools has made inroads into so many organizations because of a couple of key considerations that we should think about. First, simplicity sells. We have been treating our users like with Sport Utilities Vehicles - we have giving them all this power that hardly ever use. How much % do you use of MS Word or Excel functionality? 3%? 5%? But we are paying for 100%.And we have been almost brain-washed by bad user interface, e.g. what did we press to turn Windows off….? START. We now want solutions that are intuitive to use – gone are the days we could send staff on 2-3 days product trainings.Second, these solutions are incredibly fast and easy to implement because in many cases it’s not much more than providing a browser link to users. This leads to a number of implications: -Faster deployment and lower initial costs make it easier for an organization to “kick the tires” and decide whether the solution has value and at much lower risk. This also makes it easier to make the decision to do so rather than studying the initiative carefully for long periods of time. Faster deployment means faster uptake and faster ROIIt frees up resources that would have been required to implement the solution – most of that is done by the vendors in their data centers. All of this together means that the solutions that are selling are feature-smart rather than feature-rich.
  • 1300I want to end this by stressing again that we are half way in the chess board – the next 10 years are going to be really interesting.It is going to be fast, and you need to ensure you have the skill sets to tackle challenges and opportunities.Remember therefore to check out the AIIM Information Governance training course.Change the Game. Have fun. Thank you for your time.

Transcript

  • 1. When Information Matters From System of Record to System of Engagement Atle Skjekkeland, CIP Chief Operating Officer, AIIM
  • 2. 2 AIIM provides public and private training = AIIM.org/training AIIM provides research & benchmarking = AIIM.org/research AIIM provides on-line and in-person events = AIIM.org/events @skjekkeland askjekkeland@aiim.org
  • 3. 3 Free copy, AIIM.org/research
  • 4. 4 When Information Matters – From System of Record to System of Engagement 1. The 50,000 Foot Context – An Industry at an Inflection Point 2. The Reality on the Ground – Not as Easy as it Seems 3. The Critical Role of Content Management
  • 5. 5 90% of the data in the world today was created in the last two years. Source: From Defensible Disposal: You Can't Keep All Your Data Forever, Forbes, 7/17/2012
  • 6. 6 Content Management The same as EierlegendeWollMilchSau…? Image source = http://www.customercentricthinking.com Content management combines analytics, collaboration, governance and processes with anywhere, anytime access to deliver value to your customers, partners, and employees.
  • 7. 7 The Future History of Content Management Key Trends AIIM.org/FutureHistory
  • 8. 8 Era Years Typical thing managed Best known company Content mgmt focus Mainframe 1960-1975 A batch trans IBM Microfilm Mini 1975-1992 A dept process Digital Equipment Image Mgmt PC 1992-2001 A document Microsoft Document Mgmt Internet 2001-2009 A web page Google Content Mgmt Social, Mobile, Cl oud & Big Data 2010-2015 An interaction Facebook ? Systems of Engagement Systems of Record
  • 9. 9 A Tale of Two Humps…
  • 10. 10
  • 11. 11 Image source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mxmstryo/4033816209 Big problems. Big solutions.
  • 12. 12 And Then Everything Changed in the Left Hump
  • 13. 13 And Continue to Change
  • 14. 14 And While All That Was Going On… SOCIAL
  • 15. 15 Email Generation Facebook Generation These guys are retiring These are the new customers and workersThese are making the purchasing decisions Demographics is Destiny Source: John Newton, Alfresco You are losing control of your brand, workers, and IT.
  • 16. 16 MOBILE Source: Mary Meeker, Kleiner Perkins 4.2bn people with a toothbrush 5.1bn people with a cell phone
  • 17. 17 Better Access
  • 18. 18 Photo courtesy of Lubor Ptacek, Opentext CLOUD
  • 19. 19 Offering an App for Everything
  • 20. 20 + = #AIIM13 When combining Mobile, Social, And Cloud Computing….
  • 21. 21 The Consumerization of Enterprise IT “We want this. And that. We demand a share of this and most of that. Some of this, and all of that. Less of that, and more of this, and plenty of this. And another thing. We want it now. We want it yesterday, and more tomorrow. And the demands will all be changed then. Stay awake” - Billy Connolly
  • 22. 22 1. The 50,000 Foot Context – An Industry at an Inflection Point 2. The Reality on the Ground – Not as Easy as it Seems 3. The Critical Role of Content Management When Information Matters – From System of Record to System of Engagement
  • 23. 23 Reality #1 -- Conflicting Revenue Models On the left hump… Source: Michael Moon, Gistics
  • 24. 24 Reality #1 -- Conflicting Revenue Models On the right hump… Source: Michael Moon, Gistics
  • 25. 25 Reality #2 – Overlapping Value Propositions From the Complex Systems side… • How can I break up expensive monolithic systems into apps? • How can I learn from the volume space to decrease the hurdle to buy? • How can I take my product to the cloud? • How can I reduce the complexity of my sales cycle? • How do I take my product downstream? From the Volume side… • How can I break into the enterprise? • How do I convince executives that this model is safe? • How can I end run IT by going directly to the business? • How do I establish – and then expand – a beachhead? • How do I take my product upstream? What can you take from the other hump?
  • 26. 26 Reality #3 -- Confusion About “the Industry” ENTERPRISE Becoming: • Mobile • Global • Open • Engaged • Agile • Adaptive MANAGEMENT Becoming: • Social • Collaborative • Open • Flexible • Inclusive CONTENT Becoming: • Complex • Invaluable • Viewed as asset • Source of advantage ECM
  • 27. 27 A New Kind of Process Challenge Reality #4 -- A Huge Gap Between SoR and SoE
  • 28. 28 Reality #5 – New Skills Required WAS/IS… • IT helps reduce costs. • Senior Execs oblivious to technology. • Complexity insures job security. • IT is a railroad builder. • Process standardization the objective. • Most spending CAPEX. • Mobile/social are differentiators. • Pure technical skills valued. Most of the money is still here. WILL BE… • IT helps reduce risk and create value. • Senior Execs tech aware. • Simplicity is the pre-eminent value. • IT is a taxi company. • Process agility the objective. • Most spending OPEX. • Mobile/social are a feature. • Technical skills in context valued. Most of the money will soon be here. New Integrated Skills for the Age of Social, Mobile, and Cloud
  • 29. 29 Become an Information Professional “Professional roles focused on information management will be different to that of established IT roles….An "information professional" will not be one type of role or skill set, but will in fact have a number of specializations.” Deb Logan and Regina Casonata – Gartner - CIO Alert: You Need Information Professionals “The IT worker needed … for the future needs to be multi-skilled – with a mixture of technical skills combined with strong business and communication skills.” World of Work, 2011 “Raw technology skills are of lesser importance than they once were. Now the ability to influence stakeholders across IT, legal, communications, marketing, and HR is of utmost importance.” Leslie Owens, Matthew Brown and Anjali Yakkundi, Forrester Data scientists, digital archivists, content managers, community managers,....
  • 30. 30 1. The 50,000 Foot Context – An Industry at an Inflection Point 2. The Reality on the Ground – Not as Easy as it Seems 3. The Critical Role of Content Management When Information Matters – From System of Record to System of Engagement
  • 31. 31 Opportunity #1: Capitalize on Content Manage risks, reduce costs, and maximize value “There will be an incomprehensible, mind-explodingly massive expansion in the amount of information floating around.” - Thornton May
  • 32. 32 Improve Transparency What productivity or staff engagement factor would you put on the ability to share opinions, find expertise, answer questions and communicate activities via staff blogs, micro- blogs, social sites and other Enterprise 2.0 technologies? 18.2% more efficient (average)
  • 33. 33 In terms of timescales or project costs by what factor would you say a collaborative, widely accessible team-site environment can (or has) improved project delivery in your organization? Improve Collaboration 24.9% faster (average)
  • 34. 34 How much more productive do you think the administrative staff in your organization would be (or are) if their processes were work-flowed, using scanned forms and documents, with automated data capture? Automate Processes 33.5% more productive (average)
  • 35. 35 Preserve Content Assets How much can/could you reduce legal costs, fines and damages if you applied best practice procedures to records management, security and e-Discovery? 25% reduced costs (average)
  • 36. 36 Mobilize Content Photo source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/globalx/4864001692/ How much would it improve (or have you improved) the efficiency of your office staff by giving them sufficient remote or mobile access to company information that they are able to efficiently work from home or on-the- road?25.1% more efficient (average)
  • 37. 37 Improve Internal Access How much more productive do you think professional staff in your organization would be (or are) if they could find internal information and documents as quickly and as easily as they find information on the web? 30.9% more productive (average)
  • 38. 38 By how much do you think customer service levels and response times could be (or have been) improved if all of your customer-facing staff could immediately access and share all of the customer related and case- related information that you hold. Improve External Access 32.2% more responsive (average)
  • 39. 39 Opportunity #2: Establish an Information Governance Framework Source: https://www.cgoc.com/resources/information-lifecycle-governance-leader-reference-guide
  • 40. 40 A New Strategy for Information Governance 1. Manage all information, not just records 2. Connect legal, privacy and regulatory retention obligations to relevant information 3. Retention periods must take into account the business value of information in addition to legal and compliance value 4. Identify where information is located 5. Ensure that retention and disposal obligations are communicated and publicized in a language that stakeholders can understand 6. Allow for flexibility to adapt to local laws, obligations and limitations 7. Include a mechanism that allows legal and IT to collaborate in executing and terminating legal holds 8. Identify and eliminate duplicate information 9. Update in real time to account for changes in laws, to business and in technology Source: Lorrie Luellig, Ryley Carlock & Applewhite http://www.cioinsight.com/it-management/inside-the-c- suite/a-modern-governance-strategy-for-data-disposal.html/
  • 41. 41 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Excess litigation costs or damages resulting from poor records… Loss of customer confidence or bad publicity from data loss Loss of intellectual property or company confidential information Inability to respond to requests (Freedom of Information) Infringement of industry-specific compliance regulations Audit qualifications due to inadequate records Regulator action from loss/exposure of personally identifiable… Poor outcome of customer/supplier disputes due to gaps in… Criminal prosecution for allowing personally sensitive data to… Manage Risks Which of the following do you consider to be the three biggest risks to your company from a failure of information governance? (max THREE) N=500
  • 42. 42 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Reduce storage and infrastructure costs Exploit and share our knowledge resources Faster response to events, accidents, press… More personalized and accurate service to customers Better customer/supplier relationships Support for potential big data initiatives Better reputation/improved shareholder value Faster and cheaper financial audits Control social media for positive benefit Reduce Costs Which three of the following do you consider to be the biggest benefits to your company from good information governance? (max THREE) N=506
  • 43. 43 Opportunity #3: Leverage Analytics to connect SOR and SOE
  • 44. 44 Paul Otellini, CEO at Intel was recently asked by Charlie Rose: “What is going to be obsolete next? Otellini responded: “Ignorance.”
  • 45. 45 Day-forward Hygiene Auto- classification Analysis Using powerful search and analytic tools to interrogate content to better understand it and perform simple actions Using training sets and iterative passes, teach a system how to recognize and classify record types Reengineering user and system behavior to enforce information consistency and classification at the point of creation Source: Doculabs Automate Disposition & Records Management
  • 46. 46 Remember: Keep it Simple and Smart
  • 47. Thank you Atle Skjekkeland askjekkeland@aiim.org @skjekkeland.com www.aiim.org