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What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
What is BPM?
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What is BPM?

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This presentation provides you with an overview of Business Process Management (BPM). The slides are from AIIM's BPM Certificate Program, which is a training program designed from global best …

This presentation provides you with an overview of Business Process Management (BPM). The slides are from AIIM's BPM Certificate Program, which is a training program designed from global best practices among AIIM's 65,000 Associate and Professional members. The BPM program covers concepts and technologies for process streamlining and re-engineering; requirements gathering and analysis; application integration; process design and modelling; monitoring and process analysis; and managing change. For more information visit www.aiim.org/training

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  • 1. What is BPM?
  • 2. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 2 BPM Defined • Business Process Management is a generic term, that encompasses the techniques, structured methods, and means to streamline operations and increase efficiency. • BPM techniques and methods enable you to identify and modify existing processes to align them with a desired (improved) future state. Business Process Management is a means to study, identify, change, and monitor business processes.
  • 3. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 3 BPM is not… • The automation of manual tasks • Re-engineering the Enterprise • Change Management • Six Sigma • A management methodology • Workflow or BPM technology But the techniques and tools can be used to support any of these……if you want them to!
  • 4. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 4 Principles of BPM: • Organise around outcomes not tasks • Correct and improve processes before (potentially) automating them • Establish processes and assign ownership • Standardise processes across the enterprise • Enable continuous change • Improve existing processes, rather than build radically new or ‘perfect’ processes
  • 5. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 5 Typical Business Drivers • Perceived or Expected Benefits: – Reduce staff and office overhead numbers – Process business critical activities faster – Reduce the number of errors and exceptions – Reduce overall IT costs – Reduce duplications – Increase visibility into operational efficiencies and bottlenecks – Reduce business risks – Improve customer service and retention http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 6. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 6 The Mandate BPM changes things. • You need the authority, the will, and the ability to change things; this means aligning any project with enterprise goals And • You need the support of those whose daily work and activities you will change, as well as the support of the management that owns the overall process http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 7. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 7 BPM & Ethics • BPM changes things. – Our projects will commonly impact the day to day work activities of individuals and groups • Often reducing human involvement in a process – Our projects will typically utilize confidential and secure data – Our projects will commonly have an impact on the enterprise as a whole (increased profit/efficiency) • As such every BPM project needs to consider and be aware of the ethical issues that will occur on a daily basis • Process consultants often face difficult or conflicting ethical situations http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 8. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 8 Business Analysis • No business process improvement or change activity can be undertaken without the use of business analysts and/or business analysis techniques • You must never attempt to change a business process without first analyzing the business impact of the change in detail • Most people think they understand the techniques of analysis (e.g., requirements gathering), but few actually do • Most projects failures do not stem from technology – Rather, a lack of insight, stakeholder support or planning -- all things that are the focus of business analysts!
  • 9. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 9 Methods • In analysis work - consistency of methods of collection and delivery are essential • There are many different types of methods • The use of any method is typically much more effective than none - or a loose hybrid • This presentation introduces you to three potential approaches for both business and technology process analysis – Business Process Analysis – Structured Analysis – Object-oriented Analysis http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 10. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 10 1. Business Process Analysis • Most common starting point is when something is not right in the organisation… – A meta problem: there are duplicative processes and information across departments – A business problem: exception rate is too high – A micro problem: some user interface screens are confusing • Business Analyst needs to – evaluate the situation from various angles and identify core issues – review any documentation, interview workers – flowchart/document current process – recommend improvements • When to use: When you have already clearly identified a specific process or process for improvements http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 11. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 11 • Centered around understanding of Objects and Classes – Class - A class describes the characteristics of a thing (attributes, behaviors, properties, etc.) – Object - An instance of a class • modeling techniques linked to UML (Unified modeling Language) and software engineering • Analysis focuses on “use cases” • Makes use of Sequence Diagrams, Class Models, and Activity Diagrams • When to use: When you wish to improve a specific business applications’ performance and usability 2. Object-Oriented Analysis http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 12. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 12 3. Structured Analysis • Views a “System” as a collection of processes executed according to certain logic (or illogic!) • Focuses on data flows • Models Data and Processes separately • Makes use of Data Flow Diagrams, Relationship Diagrams, and Flowcharts • When to use: When you wish to improve your existing IT investment infrastructure and gain greater process efficiencies in the enterprise http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 13. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 13 Flowcharts Defined What is a flowchart? • “A graphical representation of the sequence of activities, steps, and decision points that occur in a particular, discrete process.” http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 14. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 14 Flowchart Example
  • 15. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 15 Why Flowchart? • To explain the sequence of a process graphically • To improve communication and obtain business-user validation • To identify bottlenecks and loops • To assist with problem analysis • To provide a blueprint for development • To identify variations in process activity http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 16. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 16 Charting vs. Modeling • Flowcharting creates a graphical representation of the sequence and key elements of a business process • Process modeling extends this by – Mapping dependencies and related flows – Adding data intelligence to the steps – Enabling simulation of flows to check for efficiencies and bottlenecks – Enabling reuse of mapped chart elements – Supporting future monitoring of improved processes http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 17. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 17 Advantages of Modeling • There are seldom single process flows - processes tend to have interdependencies – These are difficult to capture in a regular flowchart – Multiple processes and systems are the hallmark of most BPM projects • The granular level of detail in a model supports eventual automation analysis • Cross-dependent processes can be acknowledged and inter-related • The needs of different stakeholders can be managed holistically (from business to technical) • Models can potentially become managed objects in a ECM/BPM repository with version and access controls
  • 18. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 18 BPMS EA modeling Drawing Tools End User Focus Infrastructure Focus System to System focus Human to Human focus Development Tools Modeling Tool Options
  • 19. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 19 Model to Execution • “Execution” means implementing the model in an ECM or BPM system • The promise of powerful modeling tools is to create a process model, then to automate its execution • The reality is far more complex – tools for moving from modeling to execution are evolving slowly http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 20. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 20 BPMN (Business Process Modeling Notation) XPDL (XML Process Definition Language) BPEL (Business Process Execution Language) Standards and Protocols http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 21. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 21 BPMN (Business Process Modeling Notation) BPMN consists of four basic elements: • Flow Objects • Event • Activity • Gateway • Connecting Objects • Sequence Flow • Message Flow • Association • Swimlanes • Pool • Lane • Artifacts • Data Object • Group • Annotation BPMN
  • 22. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 22 Reality of BPMN • BPMN has been designed to be understood by business analysts to technical developers • BPMN is a good standard - but it does not always translate to BPEL (execution) - interim work will likely be required • All standards are open to interpretation - business analysts address different issues to technical developers… http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 23. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 23 Technology • Maybe none at all (often) • In the context of this course: – BPM – Workflow – Smart Process Apps – ECM (Enterprise Content Management) – ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) / Business Applications http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 24. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 24 Contemporary BPMS Architecture Design & Simulation Services Monitoring Services Process Registry Orchestration (Workflow) Engine Rules Engine Integration Services Content / Data Repositories Note: Not all tools provide all these services or implement them in the same way…
  • 25. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 25 Design & Simulation • Tools to capture and design business process models • Designed to be used in the first instance by business analysts • Good design tools enable primary flowcharting, and secondary detailed modeling activities • Advanced UIs also allow for processes to be simulated so that existing and proposed process enhancements can be tested and modified in advance of go-live http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 26. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 26 Analysis and Activity Monitoring • Sometimes called Business Activity Monitoring, or “BAM” • Data is created whilst executing a business process • The data can be analyzed and displayed via dashboards or reports • Processes need to be monitored! – Who has what – Where it is – When they got it • Identifies bottlenecks and areas of weak or no activity • Provides reporting • Enables process analysis http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 27. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 27 Process Registry • Contains the process models and rules • Also contains metadata about processes • Supports re-use of process components • Web Services (SOA) compatible approach • Traditional challenges of component re-use apply… • Granularity and componentisation • Management complexity • Governance http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 28. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 28 Orchestration (Workflow) Engine • Core component for BPM • Sometimes called Process Engine or Process Server • Parses and implements rules governing transitions between tasks • Updates the state of each process instance • Offers or delivers tasks as needed to workers or applications to do the work • Provides reporting and alerts on demand http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 29. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 29 Integration • BPM application will seldom access just one source of information • Hence the need to link the Orchestration Engine with other sources of data and services • The process definition needs to be comprehensive enough to understand and address the application • Invocation can be either push or pull • May require variety of integration techniques: – EAI – ESB – BPM to BPM – Brute force http://www.aiim.org/bpm
  • 30. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 30 Rules engines: • Driven by defined rules, rather than processes • Separates business rules from application code • Evaluate the information provided by the process and control changes in complex flows – Business processes often have complex flow controls. • Allow the separation of rules from business processes – This composite approach provides more flexibility and is more adaptable to change Business rules describe the policies and practices of an organisation. For example a business rule might state that no credit check is to be performed on return customers Rules Engine
  • 31. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 31 Content Repository • ECM repository containing mainly unstructured data (documents and files) • Manages information created in the business process • Manages information used by the business process • Manages metadata that may drive business processes – E.g., content of a certain document type prior to a particular date is processed differently than other document types
  • 32. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 32 Relationship Between BPM & ECM Both BPM and ECM: • Have notions of workflow – Involve business processes – Involve use of resources – Involve tasks • Work on the basis of “the right information, to the right person, at the right time” • Have a reputation for being expensive ECM almost always involves processes • But not all BPM deals with ECM (unstructured content)
  • 33. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 33 BPM as a Practice BPM as a Project BPM Master For more information - AIIM BPM Certificate Program 99.7% found the course content to be excellent, good, or satisfactory 26% of course attendees got promoted, got a higher salary/bonus, got a new job, or landed new customers as a result of taking the course http://www.aiim.org/training
  • 34. © AIIM | All Rights Reserved 34 BPM Practitioner Course – available as an online, 24/7 self-paced, or 2-day face-to- face course: - Get a thorough understanding of different workflow and BPM technologies - Learn the fundamentals of flowcharting and standard charting symbols and functions - Learn how to best map, analyze, standardize, and automate business processes - Learn how to take a finished process model to execution - Identify and plan enterprise application integration - Earn the AIIM BPM Practitioner designation after passing the online exam BPM Specialist Course – available as an online, 24/7 self-paced course: - Identify business benefits and stakeholders of your BPM program - Learn requirements gathering and analysis - Learn best practices for designing new processes - Learn how to best manage change and continuous improvements - Earn the AIIM BPM Specialist designation after passing the online exam BPM Master BPM Master Course – available as a 3-day virtual live, or 4-day face-to- face course: - Fast track your education with the best of the BPM Practitioner and Specialist courses - Meet with, and learn from industry experts and professionals with similar challenges - Earn the AIIM BPM Master designation after passing the case study exercise http://www.aiim.org/training
  • 35. www.aiim.org/training

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