Flying Cars and Cool Uniforms - How will the future be for Information Workers?

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Information is a weapon that can be used to change reality, improve positioning, and reduce costs and risks. Knowledge is power, which means increased focus on the information worker in an electronic world. Web 2.0 has already started to influence how employees are connected to each other, and solutions like iPhone, Facebook and Twitter change our enterprise requirements for functionality and usability. Information workers want solutions like in Star Trek, and over the next few years we will see new worker models for business information and users.

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Flying Cars and Cool Uniforms - How will the future be for Information Workers?

  1. 1. Cool Uniforms  and Flying Cars How will the future be  for Information  Workers? Atle Skjekkeland, Vice President, AIIM
  2. 2. Seth Godin: “It’s human nature to  imagine that the  future will be just like  the present, but with  cooler uniforms and  flying cars.”
  3. 3. Agenda Word Cloud of presentation notes using Wordle.net
  4. 4. Current status?
  5. 5. What’s in your  digital landfill?
  6. 6. How much is 
  7. 7. By 2011, the digital universe will be as big as it was in 2006 http://www.emc.com/digital_universe.pdf
  8. 8. …you likely have core systems to  manage the MONEY in your organization and the  PEOPLE in your organization...
  9. 9. ……but what about INFORMATION?
  10. 10. …and for the Information Worker?
  11. 11. Business Drivers for the Enterprise? 12
  12. 12. • Fact 1:  – The Essence of  Leadership is  Information  Management • Fact 2: Thornton May,  – Information Quantity  Futurist, Executive  Director and Dean,  will always exceed  IT Leadership Academy Information Processing  Capacity
  13. 13. Value of Information • Prof. Donald A. Marchand's Strategic  Information Alignment model – Risks – Innovation/Create New Reality – Costs – Competitive Advantage
  14. 14. …in a flat world 15
  15. 15. The Information Age • Personal computers heralded individual productivity • Participation today exposes individual work more broadly
  16. 16. User Expectations • Access = Google • Networking = Facebook • Profiling & Insights = Amazon • Integration = Microsoft Virtual Earth • Reference & Navigation = Wikipedia • Application Development = Open Source • Documentation = SAP Developer Network
  17. 17. Example: iPhone
  18. 18. The Future Workplace?
  19. 19. The Information Workplace Picture from Minority Report
  20. 20. The Office Information Worker  Board of the Future Microsoft Surface
  21. 21. Simpler Work Index 1. Competing on Clarity: My manager organizes and shares  information in ways that help me work smarter and faster 2. Navigation: In my workplace, it is easy for me to find whomever  or whatever I need to work smart enough, fast enough 3. Fulfillment of Basics: In my workplace, it is easy to get what I  need to get my work done—right information, right way, in the  right amount 4. Usability: In my workplace, corporate‐built stuff (like IT, training,  and support) is easy to use 5. Speed: In my workplace, that same corporate‐built stuff gets me  what I need, as fast as I need it 6. Time: My company is respectful of my time and attention, and is  focused on using it wisely and effectively Source: Bill Jensen, Work 2.0 Rewriting the Contract
  22. 22. The Information Worker Functions  that I need Context  for  My  Information  my work workspace that I need Processes  that I need Source: Forrester
  23. 23. Defining Web 2.0 • Tim O'Reilly, 2004 – The Web As Platform  (inside/outside)  – Harnessing Collective  Intelligence (emergence)  – Data is the Next Intel Inside (mashups)  – End of the Software Release Cycle (SaaS, rolling  updates)  – Lightweight Programming Models (agile  development, modular)  – Software Above the Level of a Single Device  (multiple interfaces, standards)  – Rich User Experiences (dynamic, not static) 
  24. 24. Defining Enterprise 2.0 • “A system of web‐ based technologies  that provide rapid  and agile  collaboration,  information sharing,  emergence and  integration  capabilities in the  extended enterprise”
  25. 25. What is Your Organization Trying to  Accomplish With Enterprise 2.0? Business  Intelligence Source: AIIM Market Intelligence, 2008
  26. 26. How Well Suited is Enterprise 2.0 for the  Following Groups/People? 28
  27. 27. How Likely is Your Organization to Utilize  Enterprise 2.0 for the Following Business  Practices? 29
  28. 28. How Critical is Enterprise 2.0 to Your  Organization's Overall Business  Goals/Success? Source: AIIM Market Intelligence, 2008
  29. 29. Enterprise 2.0 Frameworks 31
  30. 30. SLATES • Prof. Andrew McAfee, 2006 – Search – Links – Authoring – Tags – Extensions – Signals
  31. 31. Search
  32. 32. Links © AIIM | All rights reserved 34
  33. 33. Authoring © AIIM | All rights reserved 35
  34. 34. Tags © AIIM | All rights reserved 36
  35. 35. Extensions Graphic Source: Amazon.com © AIIM | All rights reserved 37
  36. 36. Signals
  37. 37. FLATNESSES • Dion Hinchcliffe, 2007 – Freeform – Links – Authorship – Tagging – Network‐oriented – Extensions – Search – Social – Emergence – Signals
  38. 38. Freeform © AIIM | All rights reserved 40
  39. 39. Network‐oriented EDOK 2015 © AIIM | All rights reserved 41
  40. 40. Social © AIIM | All rights reserved 42
  41. 41. Emergence © AIIM | All rights reserved 43
  42. 42. Technologies? 44
  43. 43. What Technologies Fall into Your Definition of an Enterprise 2.0 Platform? 45
  44. 44. Overview of 1.0 Technologies &  FLATNESSES Directly Provides Partially Provides Does Not Provide
  45. 45. Overview of 1.5 Technologies &  FLATNESSES Directly Provides Partially Provides Does Not Provide
  46. 46. Overview of 2.0 Technologies &  FLATNESSES Directly Provides Partially Provides Does Not Provide
  47. 47. The Integrated Value • Why do I need non‐ Enterprise 2.0  Technologies? – Consider that the  creation of Wikis has  caused a resurgence in  chat rooms and  e‐mail based alerts Directly Provides Partially Provides Does Not Provide
  48. 48. The Integrated Value • Why do I need non‐ Enterprise 2.0  Technologies? – Consider that the  creation of Wikis has  caused a resurgence in  chat rooms and  e‐mail based alerts Directly Provides Partially Provides Does Not Provide
  49. 49. Positioning  Technology  Alternatives To  Business Needs Directly Provides Partially Provides Does Not Provide
  50. 50. Worker Models 52
  51. 51. Worker Models for Enterprise 2.0
  52. 52. Worker Models • Islands of Me – Culture Component  • Protectionism • Functional Isolation • Hierarchical management • Tall and thick (multiple) walls • Competition seen only  externally – Technology Component  WordPerfect 5.1 for DOS • Siloed repositories • Standalone applications • Manual integration‐reentry
  53. 53. Worker Models • One‐way Me/Enterprise 1.0 – Culture Component  • One‐way push‐based sharing • As Needed Knowledge Seeking • Closed communities/Earned Trust • Structured/Orchestrated Teams • Network Management • Semi‐permeable Functional Walls Mozilla thunderbird – Technology Component  email client • Shared yet siloed repositories • Communication‐focused Channels • Standalone workflow
  54. 54. Worker Models • Team Me – Culture Component  • Team focused • Shared repositories • Knowledge Seekers • Closed communities/Earned Trust • Limited Extended Enterprise • Cross‐Team Collaboration • Internal Cannibalization – Technology Component  • Intranets & Extranets • Groupware • Integrated work models (EAI)
  55. 55. Worker Models • Proactive Me/Enterprise 1.5 – Culture Component  • Push/Pull 24/7 • Focus on quot;Net Workquot; ‐ Patti Anklam • Extended Enterprise • Modular Work Sharing • Semi‐automatic collaboration – Technology Component  • Dynamic/Personalized Web • Agents • Portals/Dashboards • Vortals and B2B Marketplaces
  56. 56. Worker Models • Two‐way Me – Culture Component  • Proactive Community Building • COPs/COIs • Knowledge Management – Driven from the top • Collective Intelligence  – Brute force, no emergence • Strategic Collaboration • Semi‐Transparent – Technology Component  • Early Open Source • SOA/Strategic Portal Deployments • Social Networking • Information Architecture/Taxonomies
  57. 57. Worker Models • Islands of We – Culture Component • “Socialness” is a major asset • Profiling/Core Competency • Virtual Teaming • B2C Focus • Cost‐driven Outsourcing • Semi‐Mass customization – Technology Component • Strategic use of social, emergent and integration software  externally  • Rogue internal usage • Collaborative content development • SOA/Modular Adaptive Applications
  58. 58. Worker Models • Extended Me/Enterprise 2.0 – Culture Component 2.0 • Transparency • Participative/Engaged • Always On/In • Mass Customization • Agility • Competency‐Driven Outsourcing • Embedded/Strategic Collective Intelligence – Technology Component • Strategic deliberate internal deployment of emergent and social  software • Integration and Modular Programming
  59. 59. Worker Models • The 7 Business Models That Have Emerged from  Enterprise 2.0 ‐ Wikinomics, Don Tapscott – Peer Pioneers – Ideagoras – Prosumers – New Alexandrians – Platforms for Participation – Global Plant Floor – Wiki Workplace
  60. 60. The Wiki  Workplace
  61. 61. Worker Strategies • Researchers at the IT Leadership Academy in the US  have observed several general strategies for working  in a “always‐on‐ness” world – The Digital Delusionals – The WebEmersonians – The Delegationals – The Cyber‐Sailors – The Boundaries – The Neo‐Utopians
  62. 62. Generational differences? 64
  63. 63. Source: Sam Lawrence, CMO of JIVE Software Source: http://gobigalways.com/old‐people‐ruining‐social‐software‐young‐people‐ruining‐the‐workplace/
  64. 64. How Critical is Enterprise 2.0 to Your  Organization's Overall Business Goals/Success?
  65. 65. What are YOU Trying to Accomplish with  Enterprise 2.0? SPLIT Millennials Gen X Boomers 67
  66. 66. What Do You See as the Current  Shortcomings of Enterprise 2.0? Millennials Gen X Boomers
  67. 67. Millennials vs Boomers • Some differences exist • No evidence of  dramatic or polar  differences that warrant special handling – Strategic leverage Source: http://gobigalways.com/old‐people‐ruining‐ social‐software‐young‐people‐ruining‐the‐workplace/ vs. personalized approaches
  68. 68. Conclusions?
  69. 69. Four Principles for the Future • Embrace the Asset Revolution – The knowledge workers now own the means of production • Build My Work My Way – Employees know they own the means of production – They do not want to waste time in a complex ever‐flowing world  – They like try to lead a balanced life, ‐ which they will define • Deliver Peer‐to‐Peer Value – They like collaborating, and they do not want artificial barriers to  collaboration to stop them from adding value • Develop Extreme Leaders – Leaders must be accountable, willing to listen, and to be  challenged regarding the way work gets done Source: Bill Jensen, Work 2.0 Rewriting the Contract
  70. 70. Thank You! Atle Skjekkeland Vice President AIIM Email:  askjekkeland@aiim.org

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