Heart Health
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Heart Health

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  • Prevalence data is based on NHANES 3 data. Reference: Greenlund KJ et al. Prevalence of Heart Disease and Stroke Risk Factors in Persons with Prehypertension in the United States, Archives of Internal Medicine 2004;164:2113-2118
  • This is data from Steve Haffner’s landmark study in the NEJM looking at the risk of coronary events in patients with Diabetes. This study helped modify the NCEP guidelines and changed diabetes from being considered a risk factor to being considered the equivalent of coronary artery disease. First we look at people who have had coronary disease or MI. Obviously having the disease is the greatest risk of all… In patients with no prior CV disease, and NO diabetes, the risk over 7 years of a cardiovascular event is 3.5%... Close to 97% will not have an event in the next 7 years. If you have had a heart attack, the risk of a second event is almost 5 times higher 18.8%. Now look at the right – diabetes. Having diabetes gives you more risk of having a CV event than having the disease itself. And if you have diabetes and have had a heart attack you have a 50/50 chance of having another event in the next 7 years. This is why if you have diabetes, you should receive the same aggressive treatment, as if you have already had a heart attack.
  • As important as living longer is living better: Less comorbidities, restrictions, pills…Living well is the best revenge!
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