Neuroentrepreneurship: What Can Entrepreneurship Scholars & Educators (& Practitioners) Learn from Neuroscience?Presented ...
Why Neuro-entrepreneurship? Behavior starts at the “neuro” level Current methods don’t reach this deep Opportunity to a...
Latest Work such as... Entrepreneurship becoming focus?   Sahakian team – hot cognitions   Wald team - dopamine
Activation in cingulate cortex & spindle cell density                  Nemmers Prize talk May 7, 2005
Ultimatum games: This is your brain on unfairness
Herb Simon’s (1963) Levels
Example:         Libet, et.al.(1983): Experimenter can detect intent almost 500  milliseconds before subject perceives it...
Economically-important regions of the human brain
Cingulate (yellow), orbitofrontal (pink),amygdala (orange),             somatosensory (green),                         ins...
Neuroeconomics has shown usthat Experimental Methods Can: Reveal gaps in current theory Lead to better specified hypothe...
What can neuroscienceoffer? Look into the “ultimate black box” Rigorous experimental methodologies Can allow us to:   ...
Domains of neuroentrepreneurshipand experimental entrepreneurship                     Domain of Experimental              ...
Limitations of Neuroscience What about group behaviors of entrepreneurs  as versus the individual? Complex behaviors and...
Interesting and relevantdiscoveries thus far… Pre-entrepreneurial processes: affective &  cognitive reasoning Automatic ...
Relevant issues in currententrepreneurship research?   Common variance bias – attributes of    entrepreneurs may indeed b...
Neuroscience Designs asSolutions? Design not just methodology proposed   Allows for current analysis of entrepreneurial ...
Where to begin? What questionsmight we start with? Deeper cognitive structures (Mitchell, 2000)   E.g. Detect entreprene...
Potential topics for research?   Behavioral Decision Theory:     Framing Effects and Paradoxes     Preferences     Uti...
Conclusion Neuroscience methodologies and designs  have much to offer Could substantially advance the field of  entrepre...
Thank you! Norris.krueger@gmail.com@entrep_thinking (also FB, L-In)
Insula and low strategic IQ Strategic IQ (x-axis):  How much you earn  from choices &  beliefs Correlated (-) with  acti...
Overview of fMRI
Example: Entrepreneurial Opportunity Various issues in current research:   Dependent and independent variables not    sp...
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Icsb 2010 neuroentrepreneurship

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Slides from 2010 ICSB presentation on how neuroscience and entrepreneurship can inform each other, including and perhaps especially teaching!

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Icsb 2010 neuroentrepreneurship

  1. 1. Neuroentrepreneurship: What Can Entrepreneurship Scholars & Educators (& Practitioners) Learn from Neuroscience?Presented at ICSB 2010, Cincinnati OHbyNorris Krueger, Max Planck Institute & Entrepreneurship Northwest(thanks to great colleagues, Mellani Day, Angela Stanton, Isabell Welpeand more)
  2. 2. Why Neuro-entrepreneurship? Behavior starts at the “neuro” level Current methods don’t reach this deep Opportunity to ask questions:  That we could not answer before  That we couldn’t think to ask before  In a better way  To get better answers then ever before
  3. 3. Latest Work such as... Entrepreneurship becoming focus?  Sahakian team – hot cognitions  Wald team - dopamine
  4. 4. Activation in cingulate cortex & spindle cell density Nemmers Prize talk May 7, 2005
  5. 5. Ultimatum games: This is your brain on unfairness
  6. 6. Herb Simon’s (1963) Levels
  7. 7. Example: Libet, et.al.(1983): Experimenter can detect intent almost 500 milliseconds before subject perceives it Suggests neurological antecedents to:  Intentions  Behavior What does this mean with regards to antecedents of entrepreneurial intent?
  8. 8. Economically-important regions of the human brain
  9. 9. Cingulate (yellow), orbitofrontal (pink),amygdala (orange), somatosensory (green), insula (purple)
  10. 10. Neuroeconomics has shown usthat Experimental Methods Can: Reveal gaps in current theory Lead to better specified hypotheses and propositions (Dolan 2008). Identify and analyze antecedent states and their effects upon decision-making Identify reflexive versus reflective behaviors and effects
  11. 11. What can neuroscienceoffer? Look into the “ultimate black box” Rigorous experimental methodologies Can allow us to:  Understand deeper structures of entrepreneurial cognition  Map pre-decisional dynamics  Conceptualize and measure entrepreneurial decision-making  Overcome “retrospective bias” and the interactions among independent variables
  12. 12. Domains of neuroentrepreneurshipand experimental entrepreneurship Domain of Experimental Entrepreneurship Neuroentrepreneurship
  13. 13. Limitations of Neuroscience What about group behaviors of entrepreneurs as versus the individual? Complex behaviors and systems of the brain – what are we seeing/measuring… really? How to control for the influence of external or extraneous stimuli – are we measuring what we think we are measuring? Learning to use the tools, methods and procedures – a new way of thinking about the issues (steep learning curve... turf?)
  14. 14. Interesting and relevantdiscoveries thus far… Pre-entrepreneurial processes: affective & cognitive reasoning Automatic versus Intentional Processing (reflexive versus reflective) Mental prototypes – deeply held assumptions for the good or for the bad Fluid intelligence – ability to solve new problems Change blindness – focus on the little ball…
  15. 15. Relevant issues in currententrepreneurship research?  Common variance bias – attributes of entrepreneurs may indeed be correlated with attributes of the perceived opportunities  Dynamism of entrepreneurial processes  Conflicting effects of independent variables  Perceived value of opportunities
  16. 16. Neuroscience Designs asSolutions? Design not just methodology proposed  Allows for current analysis of entrepreneurial decision process, but also…  …controls for situational specifics of entrepreneurial opportunities Researchers must develop hypotheses and test explanations before the fact Modeling dynamics and causes can reveal gaps in current theory; map dynamics of pre- entrepreneurial decision processes
  17. 17. Where to begin? What questionsmight we start with? Deeper cognitive structures (Mitchell, 2000)  E.g. Detect entrepreneurial scripts and switches (on/off)?  When does the idea become an opportunity?  When is that opportunity triggered as something to act upon? Detecting discontinuous changes – “Aha!”
  18. 18. Potential topics for research?  Behavioral Decision Theory:  Framing Effects and Paradoxes  Preferences  Utilities  Game Theory  Perceptions  Emotions & Affect  Affect  Passion & Fear  Trust  Much, much more – applications in your area of research
  19. 19. Conclusion Neuroscience methodologies and designs have much to offer Could substantially advance the field of entrepreneurship Exciting new world to explore and apply We will undoubtedly be surprised and may very well have to change some current beliefs and assumptions
  20. 20. Thank you! Norris.krueger@gmail.com@entrep_thinking (also FB, L-In)
  21. 21. Insula and low strategic IQ Strategic IQ (x-axis): How much you earn from choices & beliefs Correlated (-) with activity in L insula in choice task  Are overly self- focussed people poor strategic thinkers?
  22. 22. Overview of fMRI
  23. 23. Example: Entrepreneurial Opportunity Various issues in current research:  Dependent and independent variables not specified or confounding variables not recognized or controlled for (Shane, 2000, 2004; Venkataraman, 1997)  Static versus dynamic perspective  Opportunity characteristics not recognized or matched with entrepreneur  Absence of experimental approaches

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