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The future of membership   ammc presentation 2011 The future of membership ammc presentation 2011 Presentation Transcript

  • The Futureof MembershipAmerican Museum Membership Conference! Philadelphia, PA! October 26, 2011! 1
  • §  Introductions §  Trends and TransactionsAgenda §  Culture Track §  The Interactive Imperative §  The Membership Profession and The Pulse of Membership §  Q&A and Conclusion 2
  • IntroductionsDana Hines Membership Consultants!dana@membership–consultants.comNoreen Ahmad LaPlaca Cohen!noreen@laplacacohen.comRosie Branstetter fiveseed!rosie@fiveseed.com 3
  • Trends andTransactions 4
  • §  Demographics. §  How we transact membership.A ChangingLandscape §  Expectation of discounts. §  Who our members are. §  How we get and keep members. §  The membership profession. 5
  • A Case Study:The Houston Zoo 6
  • §  Set in a 55-acre lush tropical landscape, the Houston Zoo is home to more than 6,000 exotic animals representing more than 800 species.§  The Houston Zoo has an annual attendance of more than 1.8 million visitors along with 45,200 member households. 7
  • 2010 U.S. Demographics According to the 2010 U.S. Census, 16% of the! population is Hispanic. This is expected to rise! from 16% to 30% by 2050. §  A higher percentage of Houston’s population is!The Houston Zoo Hispanic than most of the country. §  In 2000, 37% of the Houston population was! Hispanic of any race and 61% were born! outside of the United States. §  However, only 10% of the Zoo’s membership! base is Hispanic. 8
  • Introduction §  Demographically, Hispanic guests were not buying! memberships at the rate of their attendance at the! Zoo (10% vs. 38%). §  Working with researchers from Rice University, the Zoo examined this issue. The Houston Zoo §  Findings: The Zoo’s Hispanic consumers did not! react well to the term “membership.” §  The Zoo decided to implement a Season Pass to! achieve an increase in Hispanic participation. Goal §  To engage interest in membership programs from! additional ethnic groups, with a strong focus on the! Hispanic market. 9
  • Key Operational Methods §  Created a six month individual pass in the summer! of 2010 and named it Houston Zoo Season Pass.The Houston Zoo §  Adult passes were $15 and children passes! were $12. §  The only benefits attached to the pass were free admission for six months and usage of the member express entrance. 10
  • Key Operational Methods §  No ticket upgrades were allowed with the passes. §  The pass was marketed and sold only onsite. §  Table set up in front of the Zoo with SpanishThe Houston Zoo signage to sell the passes. −  Staffed with 2 Hispanic sales representatives! and 3 application processors. −  Anyone could buy the pass but marketing was! driven toward the Hispanic market. §  The passes were sold over two weekends at the end of July and beginning of August. 11
  • Results §  Sold more than 1,200 passes in 4 days.The Houston Zoo §  Able to target multiple family sizes. §  Passes assisted in driving attendance to the Zoo. §  Guaranteed revenue from pass holders. 12
  • §  How are people joining?How We Transact! §  How are they renewing?Membership §  Are direct mail and telemarketing dead? §  Should all communications and transactions be electronic? 13
  • Gen Y Gen X Boomers 20-30 yrs 31-46 yrs 47-65 yrs Checkout donation 48% 57% 52% (This is comparable to onsite sales!) Check by mail 26 43 54How We Transact! Gift shop 28 35 32Membership Website 29 35 31 Third-party vendor 25 27 17 Phone 8 10 16 Monthly debit 11 17 14 Mobile/Text 14 13 4 Social networking site 9 6 4 14
  • §  People are living by discounts. §  Internal decisions to discount. §  External means of discounting—Groupon and !The Expectation ! Living Social.of Discounts – Memberships. – Admissions. §  Membership IS a discount. §  What is happening to our perceived value of membership? 15
  • §  Know your member profile.Who Are Our! §  Age, presence of children, geographic pockets.Members? §  Target audiences. §  What each market segment might be looking for in their membership relationship. 16
  • The Biggest Issues!! Acquisitions §  How to define, then find, new audiences. §  Demographics are changing in the U.S., how do we make museums an attractive lifestyle choice?How We Get andKeep Members §  How to engage a younger audience . . . is this! possible? §  Should you be customizing solicitations by different! audience interest groups? §  Should you be customizing your membership levels! by different interest options? §  Mission vs. value members—how will you balance these motivations for joining? 17
  • Onsite Solicitations Become! More Important §  More challenging to find new prospects.How We Get and §  Work with your visitors, but even smarter.Keep Members §  Gain new members and collect: −  Names. −  Addresses. −  Emails. −  Interests. 18
  • Renewals §  How best to gain new members’ loyalty? §  How to deliver an experience that satisfies year! after year?How We Get and §  Which will be the best solicitation strategies for!Keep Members highest ROI—mail, email, 2-year members? §  Where does discounting fit in terms of renewals for the future? It’s the mission vs. value motivation again. §  First year renewals are the toughest—so make the first year more memorable. §  Engaging welcome packet/communications/ events. 19
  • Special Importance for Renewals §  Some things never change . . . How We Get andKeep Members §  Know your numbers. – What are your renewal rates? – How are people renewing? – Why are they not renewing? 20
  • Whole Institution ApproachHow We Get and §  Collaborate fully with education, curatorial, visitor!Keep Members services, and marketing to ensure the promised! membership experience is delivered. §  Develop new member welcome strategy. §  Keep it fresh! 21
  • Maintain BEST PRACTICES §  Know your numbers.How We Get and §  Be alert to new ideas and receptive to change.Keep Members §  Test new ideas. §  Before you change the program, can you and your organization deliver the experience? §  Without risk there are no new great ideas! 22
  • Multi-Everything (Cultural,!How We Get and Generational, Interest)Keep Members §  Make your museum a valued lifestyle choice for groups who have not traditionally been part of ! your plan. §  Be you, but reach out—how to do this best? 23
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  • The Interactive Imperative 50
  • How to use online social media and mobile to! increase membership:The Interactive! §  Awareness.Imperative §  Engagement. §  Conversion. §  Retention. 51
  • SOURCE: Museum Next 52
  • SOURCE: Museum Next 53
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  • The Mobile Revolution 56
  • §  There are 5.3 billion active mobile devices in the! world (that’s 70% of the world’s population). §  By the end of 2011, over 85% of hand-sets will be!The Mobile! able to access the mobile web.Revolution §  There were over 6.1 trillion text messages sent ! in 2010. §  Smartphones will overtake feature phones in the! U.S. in 2012. 57
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  • Indy Museum Adventure TrekIndianapolis Jones needs your family tohelp locate seven treasures in themuseum. Work together to figure out theclues to try and find the location of eachtreasure.Text childrensmuseum to 728647 61
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  • Getting MoreMemberships Online 65
  • Getting More! §  Best practices in user experience.Memberships! §  Winning with promotions and contests.Online §  Converting site visitors into members. 66
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  • Winning With Contests and Promotions 70
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  • Converting OnlineVisitors to Members 74
  • Give-to-Get §  Premium content.Converting ! §  Enhanced personalized content.Online Visitors ! §  Free content.to Members §  Discounts. §  Online community. §  Insider scoop. 75
  • Optimize the Registration!Converting ! ProcessOnline Visitors ! §  Shorten the registration form.to Members §  Adopt a progressive disclosure model. §  Leverage the user’s existing identities. 76
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  • Pulse of Membership 2011 81
  • What is Pulse of Membership? §  A survey of membership programs nationally. §  An ongoing membership tracking survey, performed four times since the economic downturn.Pulse of!Membership 2011 §  Data collected from a pool of 2,000 membership managers, with approximate response rate of 10% each time. §  A survey conducted by Membership Consultants as a service to the field to monitor the status of membership programs in challenging fundraising times. 82
  • What Does Pulse of Membership! Explore? §  Membership statistics and trends.Pulse of!Membership 2011 §  Membership tools used and with what level of success. §  Tracks and compares membership by types of! organizations: museums, gardens, zoos. §  New in 2011: membership salary and position! statistics. 83
  • How Can I Access the FullPulse of!Membership 2011 Survey? Visit MembershipConsultants.wordpress.com to view a copy of the full survey. 84
  • Membership RevenuePulse of! §  Account for 8% to 15% of an organization’s overall!Membership 2011 operating revenue. §  Some organizations are viewing membership! revenue as “earned” revenue rather than donated! revenue. 85
  • Membership Reporting Structure §  Historically part of development departments. §  In the zoo and aquarium world, membership!Pulse of! reporting structure is:Membership 2011 – 38% to development. – 31% to marketing. – 17% to a freestanding department. – 10% to visitor services. 86
  • Membership TitlesPulse of!Membership 2011 §  Membership Director 44.1% §  Membership Manager 36.2% §  Membership Coordinator 17.5% 87
  • Length of Service In Years §  < 1 year 7.9%Pulse of! §  1 to 2 years 15.8%Membership 2011 §  3 to 4 years 24.3% §  5 to 10 years 28.2% §  Over 10 years 23.7% 88
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  • Length of Service!Pulse of! By Museum or Organization TypeMembership 2011 Zoos (31% with 10+ years of membership service)! have the membership personnel with the longest! longevity, followed by art museums (22% with 10+ years of membership service). 90
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  • Membership Salaries §  Mode: $30,000 to $40,000. §  Median: $40,000 to $50,000.Pulse of!Membership 2011 §  6% reported salaries in excess of $80,000. §  10% did not wish to respond. §  Related to length of service: 6 out 7 respondents! who make more than $90,000 have served for 10! or more years in the membership field. 92
  • The Membership Profession 93
  • How is Membership Perceived? The Membership! §  Within the museum world?Profession §  What is the positioning of the membership! department within the institution? §  What is the status of the membership! professional? 94
  • The Membership Position Within the museum world: §  Membership gaining more respectability. §  Demands on membership revenue ever greater inThe Membership! the future.Profession §  Membership is growing in importance to all institutions from a(n): – Financial perspective. – Audience perspective. – Involvement perspective. 95
  • The Membership Department What is the positioning of the membership! department within the institution?The Membership! §  More connected to the marketing side.Profession §  May move more to the transactional side. §  If that proves to be true, may see more ! institutions considering membership dues as! earned revenue. §  Must still maintain close ties to development! functions. 96
  • The Membership Professional What is the status of the membership professional?The Membership! §  More respectability.Profession §  Longer service. §  Salaries increasing. §  Membership is a destination position. 97
  • Membership Trends §  Membership is a destination position. §  Longer service.The Membership! §  Salaries increasing.Profession §  Membership gaining more respectability. §  Demands on membership revenue ever greater in! the future. §  Membership is growing in importance to! all institutions. 98
  • Q&A andConclusion 99
  • Contact UsDana Hines Membership Consultants! Consultantsdana@membership–consultants.comdana@membership consultants.comNoreen Ahmad LaPlaca Cohen!noreen@laplacacohen.comRosie Branstetter fiveseed!rosie@fiveseed.com 100
  • Thank You 101