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Unit 1-renaissance-pt-2
 

Unit 1-renaissance-pt-2

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    Unit 1-renaissance-pt-2 Unit 1-renaissance-pt-2 Presentation Transcript

    • Course Title: Poetry Course Code & NO.: LANE 447 Course Credit Hrs.: 3 weekly Level: 7th Level Students The Renaissance Pt. 1 Donne’s Good Morrow & Holy Sonnet 10Instructor: Dr. Noora Al-MalkiCredits of images and online content are to their original owners.
    • This Presentation• is divided into two sections (Pt. 1 & Pt. 2); each dealing with a poet who represents the English Renaissance (late 15th C. to early 17th C.)• introduces the Renaissance era (cultural and literary aspects).• presents a discussion of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18 & Donne’s “The Good Morrow” and “Death Be Not Proud”. Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 2 eaglenoora@yahoo.com
    • John Donne (1572-1631) poet, satirist, lawyer and a preist Metaphysical Poet Rebelled against Elizabethan poetry He wrote religious poetry Love poetry Sonnets Songs Satires His poetry is noted for its language & style Paradox – irony– metaphysical conceit http://www.britainexpress.com/History/bio/donne.htm http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/donne/donnebio.htm Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 3 eaglenoora@yahoo.com
    • Metaphysical PoetryMetaphysical poetry deals with human experience as much of the poetrythat was written during those times. However, the poets of the era beingintelligent and educated meant that the poetry they wrote would tackle theprofound areas of experience.“Metaphysical poems are lyric poems. They are brief but intensemeditations, characterized by striking use of wit, irony and wordplay. Beneaththe formal structure (of rhyme, metre and stanza) is the underlying (and oftenhardly less formal) structure of the poems argument.”http://www.universalteacher.org.uk/poetry/metaphys.htmhttp://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/5662 Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 4 eaglenoora@yahoo.com
    • The Good MorrowFrom the Songs and Sonnets collectionYou can find a thorough thematic and stylistic discussion ofthe poem on this site:The Good Morrow: A Metaphysical Explication Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 5 eaglenoora@yahoo.com
    • The Good Morrow Speaker’s state of mind Speaker’s reflection on that stateI wonder by my troth, what thou, and IDid, till we lovd? Were we not weand till then?But suckd on countrey pleasures, childishly?Or snorted we in the seaven sleepers den?Twas so; But this, all pleasures fancies bee.If ever any beauty I did see,Which I desird, and got, twas but a dreame of thee. Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 6 eaglenoora@yahoo.com
    • The Good Morrow,And now good morrow to our waking soules; Which watch not one another out of feare,For love, all love of other sights controules.And makes one little roome, an every where,Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,Let Maps to other, worlds on worlds have showne.,Let us possesse one world; each hath one, and is one Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 7 eaglenoora@yahoo.com
    • The Good Morrow,My face in thine eye, thine in mine appeares,And true plaine hearts doe in the faces restWhere can we finde two better hemispheares?Without sharpe North, without declining West;What ever dyes, was not mixed equallyIf our two loves be one, or, thou and I.Love so alike, that none doe slacken, none can die Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 8 eaglenoora@yahoo.com
    • The Good MorrowDonne is said to be a metaphysical poet. Metaphysics is abranch of philosophy which deals with any matter beyond thatwhich can be located through the senses; thus time, the mind,free will, God and in this case love, are all subjects ofmetaphysical thought. The Good Morrow is a prime example ofone of Donnes metaphysical poems. In common with othermetaphysical verse, The Good Morrow has realistic settingsand a metaphysical theme, or rather a theme abouttranscending from the physical to the metaphysical. Thetransformation is one concerning love; the poem is abouttranscending from a physical lust to a higher and refined formof love. Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 9 eaglenoora@yahoo.com
    • The Good MorrowThe structure of The Good Morrow is based on threeinterrelated verses. In the first verse, the poet describesthe childishness of the previous loves of himself and hislover. In the second, the poet describes how wonderfultheir new found love is after having been spirituallyawakened through each other. In the third verse, the poetdescribes how this love determines their future together.In other words, Donne has used a chronological structurefor this poem; the first verse concerning the past, thesecond verse concerning the present and the third verseconcerning the future. This structure is also implicit in thetitle of the poem. Throughout the poem we see Donnesunique use of different types of conceit and imagery, fromreligious imagery to that of sea-discoverers and mapsand even of masculinity and femininity. Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 10 eaglenoora@yahoo.com
    • Death Be Not Proud Holy sonnet 10Death, be not proud, though some have called theeMighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;For those whom thou thinkst thou dost overthrow,Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be,Much pleasure; then from thee much more must flow,And soonest our best men with thee do go,Rest of their bones, and souls delivery.Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men,And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell;And poppy or charms can make us sleep as wellAnd better than thy stroke; why swellst thou then?One short sleep past, we wake eternally,.. And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 11 eaglenoora@yahoo.com
    • Death Be Not ProudTo understand the poem, you have to put in mind:1-Donne had to suffer from a near fatal illnesses which made himapproach death and think about it continuously.2-As a priest, he had, like other men of religion, thoughts on mansmortality and the need to live as free from sin as possible.3-The Christian teaching on death is that it is not the end of life at all:that there is a resurrection and a judgment, and the life of the Christianbeliever will continue for eternity. Death, therefore, is seen as a rite ofpassage to something much better. Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 12 eaglenoora@yahoo.com
    • Death Be Not ProudThe first quatrain states the theme, with its central paradox that thosewhom death touches do not really die. That is because of the Christianhope of resurrection and immortality.The second quatrain takes the idea that sleep and death are allied,one being an image of the other (‘thy pictures’). Sleep is pleasant,therefore death must be, so why fear it? In fact, the best people, that isthose who are most pure in their lives, die most quickly, because theyknow their soul will be ‘delivered’ into a new life.The third quatrain mocks death. Death is not in control of itself, but hasto come wherever there is disease or war. So why is death so proud?Then he argues that opiates mimic death and much more pleasantly.This leads on to the triumphant couplet, that we shall wake into eternallife and death will be finished. Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 13 eaglenoora@yahoo.com
    • Death Be Not ProudThe first quatrain states the theme, with its central paradox that thosewhom death touches do not really die. That is because of the Christianhope of resurrection and immortality.The second quatrain takes the idea that sleep and death are allied,one being an image of the other (‘thy pictures’). Sleep is pleasant,therefore death must be, so why fear it? In fact, the best people, that isthose who are most pure in their lives, die most quickly, because theyknow their soul will be ‘delivered’ into a new life.The third quatrain mocks death. Death is not in control of itself, but hasto come wherever there is disease or war. So why is death so proud?Then he argues that opiates mimic death and much more pleasantly.This leads on to the triumphant couplet, that we shall wake into eternallife and death will be finished. Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 14 eaglenoora@yahoo.com
    • Death Be Not Proud ”Biblical allusions in “Death Be Not ProudAnd God shall wipe awayAll tears from their eyes; and,There shall be no more death,Neither sorrow, nor crying:Neither shall there be any more pain..For the former things are passed away?O Death, where is thy Sting?O Death, where is thy victory Dr. Noora Al-Malki 2012 15 eaglenoora@yahoo.com