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Frontline club - solo foreign correspondent

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Some thoughts on becoming a solo foreign correspondent using web tools and, basically, not much stuff. From http://kigaliwire.com

Some thoughts on becoming a solo foreign correspondent using web tools and, basically, not much stuff. From http://kigaliwire.com

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  • 1. foreign correspondent graham holliday || kigaliwire.comTuesday, 31 May 2011Good evening and thanks for coming. Apologies for coming over a bit BAFTAish, but I’msorry I can’t be with you in person tonight.
  • 2. Photo by Hez Holland/ReutersTuesday, 31 May 2011Who am I? well that’s me - the one with the press badge on - in northern Rwanda, in August2010 at a huge rally for Paul Kagame during the presidential election. Just to help give a faceto the voice during this short presentation.
  • 3. Tuesday, 31 May 2011After over a decade in Korea and Vietnam and three years in France, my wife, six year old sonand I, decided to up sticks and move to Kigali, the capital of Rwanda, in the summer of 2009.
  • 4. Tuesday, 31 May 2011I left a dining room table office in France, for a dining room table office in Kigali - althoughthis one was made by trainee carpenters out of eucalyptus - it didn’t come from IKEA. For themost part, if I’m working from home, this is where you’ll find me on a typical weekdaymorning in Kigali.
  • 5. Once upon a time...Tuesday, 31 May 2011It wasn’t always like this. My working day is radically different from what it was when I firststarted out as a freelancer, in Hanoi, in the late nineties. With that in mind, I’d like to splitthis presentation into three parts. Firstly, how to work as a pure pitch and produce freelancer- I have mostly worked for print and online, so Ill be coming from a newspaper/magazineperspective. Secondly, I’ll look at how I work now - in 2011. And finally, I’ll let you know fivelittle secrets about working abroad, about big media and about freelancing and what it reallymeans for your long term prospects as a journalist.
  • 6. Tuesday, 31 May 2011But first... How does it work starting out? OK. Before you go anywhere, you’ve gotta go andmeet editors face to face. Go with ideas, not just a pretty face. Find the editors you’reinterested in working for and follow them on Twitter, find out what they’re about and readthe sections they edit. And the archives. Read everything. Work out what they findnewsworthy. Ask yourself, what do they want? And then take them what they want - whenyou meet them. They’re busy, you might only get ten minutes. So, use them.
  • 7. Tuesday, 31 May 2011Research. Research like crazy. Research every conceivable market. Create a database ofeditors and contacts. Paperboy is a fantastic resource for outlets across all markets andregions. Even the oddest places have an English language press. And, they might buy stufffrom you. Most importantly, research the local press, find an “in” - within a few weeks ofmoving to Hanoi I was offered an editing job on the English Language Vietnam News and latera magazine editing job. Either job would have paid me enough to live on.
  • 8. Tuesday, 31 May 2011You gotta go fishing, fishing for stories and fishing for commissions. You have to pitch, andpitch a lot - it seemed like I was pitching every day when I started out. Be short and concise.Three short paragraphs are enough. Sell the idea, the who, the what and the why. And thewhy you’re the person to do the job. And then - send it everywhere - use your database ofcontacts that you built from paperboy and elsewhere and fire your pitch off to all relevantmarkets - make sure you hone the pitch to the particular vagaries of each section and editor.No-one - especially not an editor with attitude, and they all have attitude - likes receiving anirrelevant pitch.
  • 9. Tuesday, 31 May 2011Once you’ve got one commission - go for others. For instance, back in the day, I had acommission to write a piece about some rare dolphins in a remote part of eastern Cambodia.BBC wanted a news piece, but one measly commission was not gonna cover the transport,visa, food and hotel costs I would incur going into Cambodia from Vietnam
  • 10. Tuesday, 31 May 2011However, I was pretty sure Action Asia would take a ecotourism kinda angle travel piece too -so I pitched them
  • 11. Tuesday, 31 May 2011TIME Asia, on old regular, would take a nib of a quirky news piece for their Global section - Ipitched them too
  • 12. Tuesday, 31 May 2011The Guardian Travel section would likely take a similar piece to Action Asia - be careful to beclear what rights you sell to your editors - these are all different, non-competing markets.
  • 13. Tuesday, 31 May 2011The South China Morning Post was normally good for a news slot coming from a slightlydifferent angle than the BBC. Sold plenty of stuff to them before - I pitched them as well.
  • 14. Tuesday, 31 May 2011That dolphin conservationist mentioned she was from Scotland, maybe it’s worth suggestingScotland Magazine consider a profile piece on the conservationist. In a relatively short spaceof time and with a lot of lateral thinking, you built upon the one commission. Now the trip ismore than viable, it’s even profitable.
  • 15. £500 $250 $80 £250 $150 £125Tuesday, 31 May 2011All in all, it all adds up to an OK week of work which would probably involve 3 or 4 days oftravel. And another day or two of writing. A week’s work
  • 16. Tuesday, 31 May 2011Fast forward to 2011. I do far less journalism these days. For the basic, hard financial factthat media training and consultancy pays way more than doing journalism. Having said that, Istill do journalism wherever I am. I don’t want to rely on any single outlet, or the vagaries ofnewspaper payment systems. I want to do things more my way. And that’s pretty much whatkigaliwire is about - it’s an independent publication.At the end of this presentation, I’ll give you a link that’ll take you to various pages includingmore detail about how I set the site up technically, the thinking behind it, the amount of workit has generated etcetera.
  • 17. Publishing kigaliwireTuesday, 31 May 2011However, firstly, I though it might be quite useful to mention the tools I use most at themoment - please note, this short list changes every 4 or 5 months or so - that is the natureof online publishing, distribution and collaboration.Google reader is a fantastic tool to help you bring the news you want to a single website forfiltering. I start my day with this tool. Long before I even open the email inbox.No two ways about it, if you’re interested in news, you have to be across twitter and usetweetdeck to filter tweets. Use it to learn of breaking news stories - great - use it to becomethe go to guy where you live, for people to come to you with stories - betterWordpress - use this excellent blogging tool to creat your site. Perhaps think of spending alittle money on a decent template to really design the site in the way you want. I recommendgraphpaperpress templates, especially if you’re going to be producing photos or video.Diigo is a bookmarking tool. I use Diigo to archive every interesting news story I find. Ieditorialise each bookmark, send some to twitter and send the rss feed to kigaliwire.com as anews wire. In addition, I send these news items to delicious.com and embed the tag cloud asa news archive on the blog. Yes, I know that all sounded rather technical - it’s not really, but Idon;t have time to explain the nitty gritty - just think; twitter, news wire, news archive -they’re all covered using these toolsFlickr is a great photo-sharing tool. I pay $12 a year to use it. I get a lot of enquiries to usemy photos, it acts as a shop window, with a great social element. Having said that, Idistribute to 50 or so other photo-sharing websites too.Which is where pixelpipe comes in - this is a fantastic distribution tool. It allows you to knittogether your entire online presence, so that you can post once to multiple destinations. Well,worth exploring.
  • 18. Publishing kigaliwire • Google ReaderTuesday, 31 May 2011However, firstly, I though it might be quite useful to mention the tools I use most at themoment - please note, this short list changes every 4 or 5 months or so - that is the natureof online publishing, distribution and collaboration.Google reader is a fantastic tool to help you bring the news you want to a single website forfiltering. I start my day with this tool. Long before I even open the email inbox.No two ways about it, if you’re interested in news, you have to be across twitter and usetweetdeck to filter tweets. Use it to learn of breaking news stories - great - use it to becomethe go to guy where you live, for people to come to you with stories - betterWordpress - use this excellent blogging tool to creat your site. Perhaps think of spending alittle money on a decent template to really design the site in the way you want. I recommendgraphpaperpress templates, especially if you’re going to be producing photos or video.Diigo is a bookmarking tool. I use Diigo to archive every interesting news story I find. Ieditorialise each bookmark, send some to twitter and send the rss feed to kigaliwire.com as anews wire. In addition, I send these news items to delicious.com and embed the tag cloud asa news archive on the blog. Yes, I know that all sounded rather technical - it’s not really, but Idon;t have time to explain the nitty gritty - just think; twitter, news wire, news archive -they’re all covered using these toolsFlickr is a great photo-sharing tool. I pay $12 a year to use it. I get a lot of enquiries to usemy photos, it acts as a shop window, with a great social element. Having said that, Idistribute to 50 or so other photo-sharing websites too.Which is where pixelpipe comes in - this is a fantastic distribution tool. It allows you to knittogether your entire online presence, so that you can post once to multiple destinations. Well,worth exploring.
  • 19. Publishing kigaliwire • Google Reader • Twitter and TweetdeckTuesday, 31 May 2011However, firstly, I though it might be quite useful to mention the tools I use most at themoment - please note, this short list changes every 4 or 5 months or so - that is the natureof online publishing, distribution and collaboration.Google reader is a fantastic tool to help you bring the news you want to a single website forfiltering. I start my day with this tool. Long before I even open the email inbox.No two ways about it, if you’re interested in news, you have to be across twitter and usetweetdeck to filter tweets. Use it to learn of breaking news stories - great - use it to becomethe go to guy where you live, for people to come to you with stories - betterWordpress - use this excellent blogging tool to creat your site. Perhaps think of spending alittle money on a decent template to really design the site in the way you want. I recommendgraphpaperpress templates, especially if you’re going to be producing photos or video.Diigo is a bookmarking tool. I use Diigo to archive every interesting news story I find. Ieditorialise each bookmark, send some to twitter and send the rss feed to kigaliwire.com as anews wire. In addition, I send these news items to delicious.com and embed the tag cloud asa news archive on the blog. Yes, I know that all sounded rather technical - it’s not really, but Idon;t have time to explain the nitty gritty - just think; twitter, news wire, news archive -they’re all covered using these toolsFlickr is a great photo-sharing tool. I pay $12 a year to use it. I get a lot of enquiries to usemy photos, it acts as a shop window, with a great social element. Having said that, Idistribute to 50 or so other photo-sharing websites too.Which is where pixelpipe comes in - this is a fantastic distribution tool. It allows you to knittogether your entire online presence, so that you can post once to multiple destinations. Well,worth exploring.
  • 20. Publishing kigaliwire • Google Reader • Twitter and Tweetdeck • WordpressTuesday, 31 May 2011However, firstly, I though it might be quite useful to mention the tools I use most at themoment - please note, this short list changes every 4 or 5 months or so - that is the natureof online publishing, distribution and collaboration.Google reader is a fantastic tool to help you bring the news you want to a single website forfiltering. I start my day with this tool. Long before I even open the email inbox.No two ways about it, if you’re interested in news, you have to be across twitter and usetweetdeck to filter tweets. Use it to learn of breaking news stories - great - use it to becomethe go to guy where you live, for people to come to you with stories - betterWordpress - use this excellent blogging tool to creat your site. Perhaps think of spending alittle money on a decent template to really design the site in the way you want. I recommendgraphpaperpress templates, especially if you’re going to be producing photos or video.Diigo is a bookmarking tool. I use Diigo to archive every interesting news story I find. Ieditorialise each bookmark, send some to twitter and send the rss feed to kigaliwire.com as anews wire. In addition, I send these news items to delicious.com and embed the tag cloud asa news archive on the blog. Yes, I know that all sounded rather technical - it’s not really, but Idon;t have time to explain the nitty gritty - just think; twitter, news wire, news archive -they’re all covered using these toolsFlickr is a great photo-sharing tool. I pay $12 a year to use it. I get a lot of enquiries to usemy photos, it acts as a shop window, with a great social element. Having said that, Idistribute to 50 or so other photo-sharing websites too.Which is where pixelpipe comes in - this is a fantastic distribution tool. It allows you to knittogether your entire online presence, so that you can post once to multiple destinations. Well,worth exploring.
  • 21. Publishing kigaliwire • Google Reader • Twitter and Tweetdeck • Wordpress • DiigoTuesday, 31 May 2011However, firstly, I though it might be quite useful to mention the tools I use most at themoment - please note, this short list changes every 4 or 5 months or so - that is the natureof online publishing, distribution and collaboration.Google reader is a fantastic tool to help you bring the news you want to a single website forfiltering. I start my day with this tool. Long before I even open the email inbox.No two ways about it, if you’re interested in news, you have to be across twitter and usetweetdeck to filter tweets. Use it to learn of breaking news stories - great - use it to becomethe go to guy where you live, for people to come to you with stories - betterWordpress - use this excellent blogging tool to creat your site. Perhaps think of spending alittle money on a decent template to really design the site in the way you want. I recommendgraphpaperpress templates, especially if you’re going to be producing photos or video.Diigo is a bookmarking tool. I use Diigo to archive every interesting news story I find. Ieditorialise each bookmark, send some to twitter and send the rss feed to kigaliwire.com as anews wire. In addition, I send these news items to delicious.com and embed the tag cloud asa news archive on the blog. Yes, I know that all sounded rather technical - it’s not really, but Idon;t have time to explain the nitty gritty - just think; twitter, news wire, news archive -they’re all covered using these toolsFlickr is a great photo-sharing tool. I pay $12 a year to use it. I get a lot of enquiries to usemy photos, it acts as a shop window, with a great social element. Having said that, Idistribute to 50 or so other photo-sharing websites too.Which is where pixelpipe comes in - this is a fantastic distribution tool. It allows you to knittogether your entire online presence, so that you can post once to multiple destinations. Well,worth exploring.
  • 22. Publishing kigaliwire • Google Reader • Twitter and Tweetdeck • Wordpress • Diigo • FlickrTuesday, 31 May 2011However, firstly, I though it might be quite useful to mention the tools I use most at themoment - please note, this short list changes every 4 or 5 months or so - that is the natureof online publishing, distribution and collaboration.Google reader is a fantastic tool to help you bring the news you want to a single website forfiltering. I start my day with this tool. Long before I even open the email inbox.No two ways about it, if you’re interested in news, you have to be across twitter and usetweetdeck to filter tweets. Use it to learn of breaking news stories - great - use it to becomethe go to guy where you live, for people to come to you with stories - betterWordpress - use this excellent blogging tool to creat your site. Perhaps think of spending alittle money on a decent template to really design the site in the way you want. I recommendgraphpaperpress templates, especially if you’re going to be producing photos or video.Diigo is a bookmarking tool. I use Diigo to archive every interesting news story I find. Ieditorialise each bookmark, send some to twitter and send the rss feed to kigaliwire.com as anews wire. In addition, I send these news items to delicious.com and embed the tag cloud asa news archive on the blog. Yes, I know that all sounded rather technical - it’s not really, but Idon;t have time to explain the nitty gritty - just think; twitter, news wire, news archive -they’re all covered using these toolsFlickr is a great photo-sharing tool. I pay $12 a year to use it. I get a lot of enquiries to usemy photos, it acts as a shop window, with a great social element. Having said that, Idistribute to 50 or so other photo-sharing websites too.Which is where pixelpipe comes in - this is a fantastic distribution tool. It allows you to knittogether your entire online presence, so that you can post once to multiple destinations. Well,worth exploring.
  • 23. Publishing kigaliwire • Google Reader • Twitter and Tweetdeck • Wordpress • Diigo • Flickr • PixelpipeTuesday, 31 May 2011However, firstly, I though it might be quite useful to mention the tools I use most at themoment - please note, this short list changes every 4 or 5 months or so - that is the natureof online publishing, distribution and collaboration.Google reader is a fantastic tool to help you bring the news you want to a single website forfiltering. I start my day with this tool. Long before I even open the email inbox.No two ways about it, if you’re interested in news, you have to be across twitter and usetweetdeck to filter tweets. Use it to learn of breaking news stories - great - use it to becomethe go to guy where you live, for people to come to you with stories - betterWordpress - use this excellent blogging tool to creat your site. Perhaps think of spending alittle money on a decent template to really design the site in the way you want. I recommendgraphpaperpress templates, especially if you’re going to be producing photos or video.Diigo is a bookmarking tool. I use Diigo to archive every interesting news story I find. Ieditorialise each bookmark, send some to twitter and send the rss feed to kigaliwire.com as anews wire. In addition, I send these news items to delicious.com and embed the tag cloud asa news archive on the blog. Yes, I know that all sounded rather technical - it’s not really, but Idon;t have time to explain the nitty gritty - just think; twitter, news wire, news archive -they’re all covered using these toolsFlickr is a great photo-sharing tool. I pay $12 a year to use it. I get a lot of enquiries to usemy photos, it acts as a shop window, with a great social element. Having said that, Idistribute to 50 or so other photo-sharing websites too.Which is where pixelpipe comes in - this is a fantastic distribution tool. It allows you to knittogether your entire online presence, so that you can post once to multiple destinations. Well,worth exploring.
  • 24. Three rulesTuesday, 31 May 2011As far as I see it, there are three rules to working as a foreign correspondent.
  • 25. Tuesday, 31 May 2011Go somewhere cheap - especially if money is an issue - and go somewhere odd. If you’vedone your research and you’ve made contacts and you have a fairly good inkling of whatyou’re going to be letting yourself in for - Just go.
  • 26. 1. Go somewhere cheap. And odd. The odder the betterTuesday, 31 May 2011Go somewhere cheap - especially if money is an issue - and go somewhere odd. If you’vedone your research and you’ve made contacts and you have a fairly good inkling of whatyou’re going to be letting yourself in for - Just go.
  • 27. Tuesday, 31 May 2011Read everything - local press, translations of local news wires, books, blogs, twitter lists. 6months of reading just about where you’re going will stand you in very good stead. And don’tstop reading. Ever.
  • 28. 2. Read. Read loads. Before you write anything. Read.Tuesday, 31 May 2011Read everything - local press, translations of local news wires, books, blogs, twitter lists. 6months of reading just about where you’re going will stand you in very good stead. And don’tstop reading. Ever.
  • 29. Photo of Rob Crilly in SudanTuesday, 31 May 2011
  • 30. 3. Have someone interesting to talk to, somewhereinteresting to go, something interesting to write about,record, shoot, film, link to & an outlet to file to, every day” Photo of Rob Crilly in SudanTuesday, 31 May 2011
  • 31. Tuesday, 31 May 2011OK. You’ve got your laptop, your blog, you’ve set up your twitter account. You’re ready togo... OK. Stop right there. We need to think this through. To really think this through.
  • 32. !!STOP!!Tuesday, 31 May 2011OK. You’ve got your laptop, your blog, you’ve set up your twitter account. You’re ready togo... OK. Stop right there. We need to think this through. To really think this through.
  • 33. Tuesday, 31 May 2011What is it about this place you want to go and live in and work. What’s really driving you? Andwill it keep you there? Keep you interested?The whole online end of things has to be really thought out. Calling you blog Dick in Delhimight sound good now, but what about when Dick moves to Rio De Janeiro? Likewise, do youwant a twitter account to be country or city specific? You will move on one day - probably -what happens to all that you publish. Maybe you’ll create a viable online publishing outlet -maybe you’ll be in a position to sell it. Think about your goals, be clear and be realistic.OK. so you know what you want to do. What tools do you want to use? What tools do peopleuse where you are going? Where do people congregate online to discuss the place you aregoing to. It might not be all twitter and facebook. Research. Be thorough.
  • 34. • Why do you want to go there?Tuesday, 31 May 2011What is it about this place you want to go and live in and work. What’s really driving you? Andwill it keep you there? Keep you interested?The whole online end of things has to be really thought out. Calling you blog Dick in Delhimight sound good now, but what about when Dick moves to Rio De Janeiro? Likewise, do youwant a twitter account to be country or city specific? You will move on one day - probably -what happens to all that you publish. Maybe you’ll create a viable online publishing outlet -maybe you’ll be in a position to sell it. Think about your goals, be clear and be realistic.OK. so you know what you want to do. What tools do you want to use? What tools do peopleuse where you are going? Where do people congregate online to discuss the place you aregoing to. It might not be all twitter and facebook. Research. Be thorough.
  • 35. • Why do you want to go there? • What do you want to do online?Tuesday, 31 May 2011What is it about this place you want to go and live in and work. What’s really driving you? Andwill it keep you there? Keep you interested?The whole online end of things has to be really thought out. Calling you blog Dick in Delhimight sound good now, but what about when Dick moves to Rio De Janeiro? Likewise, do youwant a twitter account to be country or city specific? You will move on one day - probably -what happens to all that you publish. Maybe you’ll create a viable online publishing outlet -maybe you’ll be in a position to sell it. Think about your goals, be clear and be realistic.OK. so you know what you want to do. What tools do you want to use? What tools do peopleuse where you are going? Where do people congregate online to discuss the place you aregoing to. It might not be all twitter and facebook. Research. Be thorough.
  • 36. • Why do you want to go there? • What do you want to do online? • How are you going to do it?Tuesday, 31 May 2011What is it about this place you want to go and live in and work. What’s really driving you? Andwill it keep you there? Keep you interested?The whole online end of things has to be really thought out. Calling you blog Dick in Delhimight sound good now, but what about when Dick moves to Rio De Janeiro? Likewise, do youwant a twitter account to be country or city specific? You will move on one day - probably -what happens to all that you publish. Maybe you’ll create a viable online publishing outlet -maybe you’ll be in a position to sell it. Think about your goals, be clear and be realistic.OK. so you know what you want to do. What tools do you want to use? What tools do peopleuse where you are going? Where do people congregate online to discuss the place you aregoing to. It might not be all twitter and facebook. Research. Be thorough.
  • 37. Plan your arse offTuesday, 31 May 2011plan your arse off. Oh yes...
  • 38. Tuesday, 31 May 2011And don’t limit planning to sitting in front of a computer screen. Sometimes pen and paperwork better - especially if, like me, you really don’t have the time or inclination to learn acomputer programme that can help you create a diagram like this. What’s the point? Get thepaper and pens out.
  • 39. 5 secrets of doing journalism abroadTuesday, 31 May 2011
  • 40. Tuesday, 31 May 20111. What’s the business model? I guarantee that’s always the first question I get askedwhenever I deliver a lecture to journalism students about social media, blogs and publishingkigaliwire.Simple answer is, I don’t have one. At least not one you can easily plan for/quantify/stick inan excel sheet and say X + Y = $$$$. I don’t work that way. It’s more about transparency,visibility, connections and being reasonably good at what you do.Since I moved to Rwanda, and as a direct result of Kigaliwire, I have had been offered a lot ofwork. From editing NGO newsletters, to University lectures, photographic commissions, radioslots and more.In a nutshell, If you’ve got the drive, you’re reasonably talented, you go somewhere odd, meetlots of people, get to know your patch, keep a blog, tweet a bit too, then - at least in myexperience - opportunities will come your way.
  • 41. Tuesday, 31 May 20112. The second question about kigaliwire, which ordinarily follows the first question, is howmuch traffic does the site get?Having blogged since 2002, I strongly believe this is completely misguided question. Thereare very good reasons, for an independent journalist, having relatively low traffic, with theoccasional spike is far more desirable than having thousands or millions of visitors per day,week or month.Using a tool like statcounter, you quickly get to know who is really interested in your site.This is far more difficult if your site gets thousands and thousands of hits.For example, I know which governments visit my site every day. And, of those, I know whichdepartments of which governments visit my site every day. I also know which universities,news organisations, investment companies, NGO’s, defence agencies and consultancy groupsstop by every day.I’d go as far as to say, for the solo, wannabe, foreign correspondent, less blog traffic is betterthan floods of folk. That’s not to say, the occasional spike is not desirable. Just, don’t let thatsecond question you always give me in my lectures drive what you do and how you do it.
  • 42. Tuesday, 31 May 20113. Here’s a little secret that never gets discussed. All big media really wants is to work like ablogger. Big media has speed limits. Bloggers do not.It takes a blogger one second to decide whether they want to put a ‘facebook like’ button ontheir posts, it takes them a further 30 seconds to implement the button. No way is thispossible for big, old media - you’re looking at weeks of meetings, proposals, policydirectives, reviews and design issues.You. Can change on a dime.And Big media would SO like to be like you. But it can’t. It’s too big. You’re light, flexible andindependent. You test the boundaries, and if you’re any good, you’ll get noticed and big, old,slow media will offer you work. Not just because you’re good, but they want to attach theirbig old media name to a little bit of your coolness. SO DON”T SELL IT CHEAP.
  • 43. Tuesday, 31 May 2011The fourth big secret about being the hipster foreign correspondent with the sack full ofdigital goodies, stuck out in Lima or Lagos, is that - Back in London, New York or Paris you’rea nobody. You’re only useful and interesting because you’re the nutter who lives out there.You’re special - in the eyes of big, old media - because of where you are, not necessarilybecause of who you are. Remember that. It’ll help keep your feet on the ground.
  • 44. notmuchstuff.tumblr.com graham.holliday@gmail.com || @noodlepieTuesday, 31 May 20115. Finally, realise that if you’re new toa country you’ll be naive. People don’t like to admitthis, but we’re all naive abroad, at least for a while, especially early. Accept it, revel in it,you’ll learn from it, you’ll see stuff the jaded old grumpy hacks will never see. You’ll becomejaded and grumpy before too long too, so enjoy the naivety while it lasts.With all that in mind, dive in, the water’s lovely, things will go wrong, but they’ll gointerestingly wrong. You might not get rich, but it’s a great way to live.Thanks again for coming. Note down the link there for more information on how I builtkigaliwire. Obviously, I can’t take questions in person, but feel free to email me, or follow meon twitter if you have any queries. Thanks and I hope you have a good evening.
  • 45. Image credits: Portait of me - Hereward Holland, Reuters Correspondent Howard Beatty - Ann Althouse Fishing rod reel - Canolais Two people Business meeting - MyDigitalSLR Emma reading the newspaper - dsevilla Rob Crilly interviewing in Sudan - Rob Crilly’s blog Late Night - selva Opportunity Center - {Guerrilla Futures | Jason Tester} tube - pfig Everything else by meTuesday, 31 May 2011