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Nolan Rish Portfolio

Nolan Rish Portfolio

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  • 1. Design Portfolio Nolan Rish landscape architecture
  • 2. RISH 1 Contact Information Nolan Rish Address: 112 Birkhall Circle Greenville, SC 29605 Phone: (803) 730 - 9222 Email: nrish@clemson.edu nolangrish@gmail.com Cover Illustration “That Squiggle of the Design Process” by Damien Newman. This illustration conveys the design process which begins as brainstorming and jumbled ideas which slowly becomes refined into a single, well thought out plan This is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. http://v2.centralstory.com/about/squiggle/
  • 3. The Hive Summer 2014 Pages 28 - 33 GUEST HOUSE PERGOLA SHED UTILITY GARDEN Vine Hill Fall 2012 Pages 34 - 37 HERBS Upstate Gateway Fall 2013 Pages 38 - 43 LAWN The Flex Summer 2014 Pages 44 - 45 Schouwburgplein Spring 2012 Pages 46 - 47 Seneca Middle Fall 2011 Pages 48 - 49 HOUSE FIREPIT FOUNTAIN DECK ORNAMENTALS p Legend Environmental Suitability Miles High Medium-High Medium Medium-Low Low 0 2 4 8 12 16 Contents Crop Stop Spring 2014 Pages 4 - 9 Graniteville Fall 2012 Pages 10 - 13 Muttrah Marina Spring 2013 Pages 14 - 17 Triangle Park Spring 2012 Pages 18 - 21 Drawing Folio Spring 2014 Pages 22 - 23 Analytical Graphics Spring 2014 Pages 24 - 27 2 RISH 3
  • 4. Final Design Render The Crop Stop Design-Build Charleston, South Carolina Spring 2014 The Crop Stop is a prototype commercial kitch-en that was designed as part of the farm-to-school initiative. Funded by Boeing, this small commercial kitchen was designed to be modu-lar and easily replicated across the state and even the region. The Crop Stop will solve the key problem faced by getting fresh foods to schools. Since the growing season of many vegetables is during the summer when school is out, coops and small farms have no way to easily preserve their crops until the fall. The Crop Stop acts as a link between these smaller farms and schools by giving them a place to prepare and flash-freeze fresh vegetables. Our recipient farm was a small coop on Johns Island. In designing the kitchen, our small studio of seven started out with research, transitioned into individual de-sign concepts, combined into small groups for another design refinement, came together to fi-nalize the design and start construction. Due to the vast scale of the project and the limited time frame for the design process and construction, our team was unable to finish by the end of the semester. I, with my commitment to this project, have made it a point to stay after the semester ended to continue work on the Crop Stop for an additional month in order to finish construction. 4 RISH 5
  • 5. Section View from the North Program Access Multi-Purpose Room Wraparound Dog-trot Porch Bathroom/Storage Cold Storage/Mechanical Commercial Kitchen West Elevation South Elevation East Elevation North Elevation 50 ft 14 ft Floor Plan N These drawings represent my design concept from the individual design por-tion of the CAC.C design-build studio. My design concept focused on natu-ral ventilation that was ac-complished using a single pitch roof design. The roof was oriented in a way that it would capture the prevail-ing winds from the South. These winds would be used to draw out the heat from inside via the cerestory win-dows by taking advantage of the pressure differential from the wind coming off of the roof. My dog-trot porch design broke up the monot-ony of the long horizontal mass that is associated with many mobile home trailer chassis. View from the East Porch Crop Stop: The Dog-trot Concept View from the North 6 RISH 7
  • 6. Our final design incorpo-rated many great details which the team carried out quite well. With our limited building experience, we all learned a lot very quickly. I learned skills such as how to weld, timber frame, and roof (as seen above). The craftsmanship in which we constructed the Crop Stop was above and beyond what one would expect to find in agricultural architec-ture. We sheathed the exte-rior in a galvanized alumi-num, much like you would find on a farm. The sheath-ing is held off of the exterior by furring strips, providing a pocket of air which also aids in insulation. By implement-ing these metal sheets, we were able to create a seam-less, unbroken and appeal-ing facade. Crop Stop: Final Design and Construction Site Plan North Facade South Facade Freezer Commercial Kitchen Dog-trot Bathroom Storage Screened Porch Ramp 8 RISH 9
  • 7. Right: Zoning Diagram, Yellow is low density resi-dential, orange is medium density residential, red is re-tail, purple is industry, light blue is civic space, and dark green is greenway. Far Right: Conceptual Mas-terplan. The main focus is the blueway/greenway that runs through the cen-ter. The Town center has also been united, while still preserving the historic mill. Below: Sections showing from top to bottom: Town Cen-ter, Medium Density Residen-tial, Low Density Residential Graniteville Community Design Graniteville, South Carolina Fall 2012 In order to make walking more feasible than driving, residences must be positioned close by required amenities and necessities. These amenities and necessities include, but are not limited to retail and recreation. In order to be comfortably walkable, the distance must not exceed more than a quarter mile. In order to achieve this walkability for the greatest num-ber people, density around theses amenities should be increased. My vision for Graniteville incorporates a core retail and recreation area right across the creek from the historic old mill. Additional retail could be built around the mill in order to increase the desire to visit the site. As for the mill itself, I imagine it being renovated and partitioned into offices, shops, and restau-rants; all of which would have a great vista over Horse Creek. The view from the town center would also capitalize on the view of the creek and the blue way and green way. It has been proven that one of the major draws for people, are people themselves. The unique way the blue way and green way cut through the cen-ter of this area will provide ample opportunity for other people to come and watch as joggers, kayakers, canoes, and bikers pass through this area. 10 RISH 11
  • 8. Before and After Town Center Med. Density Residential Low Density Residential Detail of Graniteville’s pro-posed town center, empha-sizing the central plaza. The proposed blueway runs be-tween the renovated histor-ic mill and new town center. 12 RISH 13
  • 9. Right: Masterplan of Oman’s Muttrah port area. Green space, shopping, and recreation have been greatly improved. Left: Sections from top to bottom, Hotel and ship ter-minal roundabout, main marina dock, and oceanfront marina shops مMuscat is the ca اpital city of ر Oman, of which I اني Muttrah Marina Urban Design Muscat, Oman Spring 2013 had the pleasure to visit and experience. Dur-ing the field study, we learned all about the lo-cal culture and customs. Our class was tasked with redesigning the old historic district of Mus-cat known as Muttrah. Muttrah was a very in-teresting district with an old medieval styled street layout and an open air bazaar. After we returned from the field study and analyzed the the site, our class was divided into teams in order to design the district as a whole. Teams decided to divide the district into quadrants, and I undertook the redesign of the industrial port. The seaport was being relocated several miles down the coast, and the remaining port was to be repurposed for recreation and cruise ship reception. I decided to overhaul the un-sightly port into a marina, cruise ship terminal, and hotel that could be not only be utilized by Oman’s wealthy, but tourists and locals alike. 14 RISH 15
  • 10. Perspectives A view from the cruise ship terminal looking out onto the roundabout at a historic Omani ship. A view from the docks towards the hotel. The ma-rina would accomodate boats of many sizes A view from the greenspace on the seafront side of the shops and cafes. Details Roundabout for taxi and bus drop-off and pick-up from the hotels and cruise ship terminals. A cafe and lookout point where one could view the many spectacles Muttrah has to offer. The marina’s main strip that would house restau-rants, shops, and merchants. 16 RISH 17
  • 11. Master Plan and Section Triangle Park Site Design Asheville, North Carolina Spring 2012 Triangle Park is a small pocket park located in a part of Asheville that was undergoing revitaliza-tion. The park presented great opportunities to work with, but also had some restraints. Great opportunities included being street side and having great access to restaurants behind it. A major restraint that had to be overcome includ-ed the elevation change from corner to corner. My major design inspiration for this pocket park was Paley Park, located in New York City. Paley Park boasts many great features that make it successful such as movable furniture that al-lows its users to adjust and sit wherever they like. It also consists of a twenty foot waterfall that serves to wash away the noise from the busy adjacent road. Paley’s great thornless hon-ey locust trees boast a nice open canopy that helps filter a gentle light from above as well. I drew from all of these great features and imple-mented them into my design including a six foot tall water wall, movable chairs and tables, and great open canopy honey locusts. 18 RISH 19
  • 12. Triangle Park: Perspective Triangle Park: Site Model 20 RISH 21
  • 13. Drawing Folio Craft Design Charleston, South Carolina Spring 2014 During my semester at the Clemson Architec-ture Center in Charleston, I took an architectural graphics course which really helped me to de-velop my sketching and graphical communica-tion skills. At the end of the semester, the class was tasked with designing and constructing a folio. We were told we could construct whatever we wanted and I really wanted to utilize wood into my design. However, when it came to bind-ing the front and back covers together, I began looking for inspiration and came across a tech-nique used on wood that makes it flexible. I de-cided to test this technique using plexi-glass. It worked astonishingly well and was resilient to bending and stretching. It really pushed me to think about how materials can be used for pur-poses other than that which they were originally intended, and still successfully function.. 22 RISH 23
  • 14. Above and Left: Hand sketches of typical Charleston single homes Right: This project took place off of Legare Street in Charleston and included a site inventory and a mixed media collage emphasizing texture. The class also had to construct a section that analyzed the re-lationship between public versus private space. Below: Hand sketches showing architectural details of an exterior door casing, and interior molding Analytical Graphics Architectural Graphics Charleston, South Carolina Spring 2014 As stated on the previous page, I took an archi-tectural graphics course during my semester at the Clemson Architecture Center in Charles-ton, South Carolina. Charleston was an inspir-ing city to study and sketch architecture with its dense urban context and many Charleston single homes. I learned many great new tech-niques with both hand-drawn and digital graph-ics. Many of our assignments for the class had restrictions on what types of media, colors, and techniques we could use. This method was very helpful in forcing us to successfully execute our ideas in the simplest way possible, while not dil-luting the drawings with unneccesary details. 24 RISH 25
  • 15. Washington Square This exercise included analysing a public square in Charles-ton. After visiting the site and taking notes, our class was as-signed to create a site plan and exploded axonometric draw-ing using only black and white. The purpose of our renderings was to analyse buffers and screens, man-made vs natural elements, and context using line weights and textures. Heyward-Washington House For this assignment , we were tasked with documenting our site, which happened to be the historic Heyward-Washington House in Charleston, SC. The home itself was positioned adjacent to the street, but opened to a great large courtyard past the stablehouse, kitchen, and servant quarters. The second part of the assignment was to sketch a perspective, using this hand sketch to create a hybrid AutoCAD drawing, and then to use only one color to represent the most important component of the courtyard. To me, the hedgerows represented the most important component of the court-yard because they defined the geometry and symmetry of the entire space. 26 RISH 27
  • 16. The Hive Design-Build Asheville, North Carolina Summer 2014 I had the amazing opportunity to take part in a ten week design-build hosted by the Asheville Design Center in Asheville, North Carolina. Our team consisted of seven students from across the East Coast and two instructors, both of which are extremely talented architects.. Our team also had a range of majors and special-ties: A fellow landscape architect student, an ur-ban planning major, three architect majors, and a construction management major. Our proj-ect was to create a stair-covering and pavilion, which would also serve as an outdoor class-room, for the YWCA of Asheville. Our masterplan phase of this space also incorporated a design for a future memorial garden to commemorate Laurey Masterton who, for years, was a huge inspiration to the Asheville YWCA. Laurey was known for educating the children through na-ture and her hobby of beekeeping. Therefore, our space took on a honeycomb theme and was appropriately nicknamed “The Hive”. 28 RISH 29
  • 17. 1/102 1/103 (E) 6" CONC. RET. WALL ROOF PANEL DN 6: 100 SF 1 104 2 105 1 105 3 105 TYP. ROOF PANEL @ STAIR: MTL PANEL O/ 2X4 PURLINS @ 24" O.C. O/ 2X8 RAFTERS ROOF PANEL 5: 100 SF 5' - 9 1/2" 8' - 4" 8' - 4" 8' - 4" (E) 12" CONC. RET. WALL (E) SWEET GUM TREES TO REMAIN. APPROX. 25' HT. AND 15' CANOPY, TYP. DO NOT DISTURB W/IN 10' TYP. ROOF PANEL ROOF PANEL 3: 100 SF (E) CHAINLINK FENCE TO REMAIN WIDTH: 7' - 10" ROOF PANEL 2: 100 SF ROOF PANEL 4: 100 SF 1 2 3 4 5 A ROOF PANEL 1: 90 SF B B.1 ROOF PANEL 7: 100 SF 6 8 D PAVILLION ROOF: 400 SF E 0 7 8' - 0" 5' - 0" (2)2X8 GIRDERS ON BOTH SIDES OF GRIDLINE B.1 PAVILLION ROOF: MTL PANEL O/ 2X4 PURLINS @ 24" O.C. O/ 2X8 RAFTERS @ MAX 24" O.C. O/ 2X10 GIRDERS (E) SIDEWALK TO REMAIN (E) 12" CONC. RET. WALL 5' - 0" ROOF PANEL 8: 100 SF 5' - 8 1/2" DRAWN BY: LP & MG ROOF & FRAMING PLAN - OVERALL AVL DESIGNBUILD 2014-YWCA OVERALL CHECKED BY: E. MEDLOCK REVIEWED BY: E. MEDLOCK ROOF PLAN - 7/10/2014 3:59:07 PM 101 3/16" = 1'-0" 1 The Hive: Design and Modeling In developing our design, we had two main goals: to cover the stairs and to create a covered pavilion at the top of those stairs. Our team’s main theme and inspiration was ‘collision’. We thought this one word was a great representation of the YWCA because it is a place where many people of different backgrounds and diversity come together. The architecture of our cantilevered stair coverings and pavilion collide at the top of the stairs to create a very dis-tinct language between the two . This collision also created a unique and difficult engineer-ing challenge, which we worked through using both conventional and 3D modeling. With this project, we had the privelege to incorporate into our design a memorial garden in honor of Laurey Masterton- a local Asheville restaurateur, cyclist, beekeeper, and, most important-ly, a former YWCA director.. We collaberated with the current YWCA director to design the future garden, with honeycomb themed planter boxes, tables, and benches, to commemo-rate Laurey’s beekeeping, to be constructed adjacent to our classroom pavilion. The middle render on the right shows the proposed memorial garden as viewed from the pavilion. The Hive: Community Engagement and Master Planning We reached out to the YWCA right away in order to be able to deliver a final project that would exceed all of their needs and expectations. We scheduled interactive meetings with the children attending the YWCA in order to get ideas of what they would like to see in the space. It was a very satisfying experience interacting with the children and to see and hear their endless ideas of what the space could become. Full of ideas and inspiration, our team was able to develop a masterplan for not only the stairs and pavilion space, but the entire YWCA campus, which. Our masterplanning process incorporated an analysis that critically analyzed the circulation routes that was shared by parents’ cars, buses, pedestrians, and bicyclists all shared. This gave our project an important additional objective: to make the stairs a more desirable means of access to the building. Designing our covering to attract pedestrians to use the stairs instead of walking up the driveway was important to promote pedestrian safety. 30 RISH 31
  • 18. Final Details and Ribbon Cutting As we wrapped up the con-struction, our team was fi-nally able to step back and appreciate the details that brought the project together as a whole: the cantilevers along the stairs, the tiered roofs, and the collision of the stair-covering and outdoor classroom pavilion. We were able to stay within our budget due to the gracious donations by 84 Lumber and Flexi-Pave by KBI Inc..At the completion of our proj-ect, the YWCA , along with all of the children, held a ribbon cutting of the space. This occurred on the first truly rainy day of the sum-mer, which was welcomed because it allowed us to showcase that our structure could successfully func-tion to shelter and keep the space dry. Delivering this project to the YWCA was an extremely satisfying experi-ence – an amazing team, a great cause, a close-knit community, and of course, the inspiration from end-lessly imaginative children. The Hive: Construction In the beginning of the de-sign- build process, we con-structed off-site due to our pending building permit. This off-site construction, at a local technical college wood shop, worked well with the design of our many rafters and columns. The columns along the stairs re-quired us to fabricate metal plates to bolted to the ex-isting concrete retaining wall of the site. This fabri-cation took place at a local metal shop, where we also learned many other skills. At this metal shop, we also fabricated our honeycomb-themed table and benches which successfully allowed us to create a smooth tran-sition from the designed pavilion to the future memo-rial garden. After meetings and a lot of paperwork, we received our approval for the building permit within a couple of weeks of submit-tal. This allowed us to begin digging, placing columns, and pouring footings, keep-ing us on-schedule. 32 RISH 33
  • 19. HOUSE GUEST HOUSE DECK PERGOLA FIREPIT FOUNTAIN SHED LAWN HERBS ORNAMENTALS UTILITY GARDEN Illustrative Master Plan VResidential Design 0 8 16 HOUSE DECK FOUNTAIN FIREPIT PERGOLA GUEST HOUSE UTILITY GARDEN SHED LAWN ORNAMENTALS HERBS 32 Vine Hill Pendleton, South Carolina Fall 2012 This historical home located in Pendleton, South Carolina was a group project. In a team of 3, we went through client interviews, design propos-als, concept drawings, construction drawings, and master plan development. I was in charge of construction drawings for the pergola as well as final sections and the final master plan. The client had several important criteria that had to be met as well as features that he wanted included in the design. These included handi-cap accessability, a large deck for entertain-ing guests, both a herb garden and vegetable garden, a guest house, and increased parking space. The client wanted a design that incorpo-rated a formal geometry and design that would not overwhelm his smaller backyard space, and was pleased with our team’s design proposal. 34 RISH 35
  • 20. 6X6 POST GRAVEL SUBGRADE CONCRETE FOOTING EARTH 0' - 10" 4 PERGOLA FOOTING DETAIL 4 PERGOLA FOOTING DETAIL 1X2 LATTICE SLAT 2X8 PRESSURE TREATED LUMBER 2X8 PRESSURE TREATED LUMBER (2) 12" X 1 3" BOLTS 6X6 POST 0' - 3" 0'-312 " 0'-3" NOTCH SCALE 1 2" = 1' - 0" 5 PERGOLA TOP OF POST DETAIL SCALE 2" 1 = 1' - 0" 1' - 3" 0' - 6" 1' - 6" 30' - 0" 10' - 2" O.C. 9' - 4" O.C. 10' - 2" O.C. 1' - 6" O.C. 1'-6" Overhang 15' - 0" O.C. 0' - 7" O.C. 1' - 0" 2' - 3" O.C. 3 1' - 0" 1 PERGOLA ENLARGEMENT PLAN SCALE 4" 1 = 1' - 0" 33' - 1 12 " 1' - 6" O.C. 11' - 10 3 4" 9' - 4" 11' - 10 34 10' - 4 3 4" 10' - 4 34 2 PERGOLA SECTION SCALE 4" 1 = 1' - 0" 16' - 6" 14' - 6" O.C. 0' - 7 1 2" O.C. 2' - 3" O.C. 3 PERGOLA SECTION SCALE 4" 1 = 1' - 0" " GUEST HOUSE 1X2 LATTICE SLAT 16' - 6" 2X8 PRESSURE TREATED 6X6 POST 2 0' - 7 1 10' - 0" 2" 0' - 4 12 10' - 0" " " 1X2 LATTICE SLAT 2X8 PRESSURE TREATED LUMBER 2X8 PRESSURE TREATED LUMBER 6X6 POST 2X8 LUMBER 6X6 POST 1X2 LATTICE SLAT 2X8 LUMBER 6X6 POST GUEST HOUSE 5 0' - 1 1 2" 0' - 7" 0' - 7 1 0' - 4" 0' - 2" 0' - 7 1 0' - 4" 6 PERGOLA TAIL DETAIL SCALE 1" = 1' - 0" 2X8 PRESSURE TREATED LUMBER 2" PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT CONCRETE FOOTING 1X2 LATTICE SLAT 2X8 PRESSURE TREATED LUMBER 2X8 PRESSURE TREATED LUMBER 0' - 7 1 2X8 LUMBER 6X6 POST 36 RISH 37 PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT 6X6 POST GRAVEL SUBGRADE EARTH 6X6 POST 0'-312 " 0'-3" NOTCH SCALE 1 2" = 1' - 0" 5 PERGOLA TOP OF POST DETAIL SCALE 2" 1 = 1' - 0" (2) 12" X 1 3" BOLTS 1' - 3" 0' - 3" 0' - 6" 1' - 6" 0' - 10" 30' - 0" 10' - 2" O.C. 9' - 4" O.C. 10' - 2" O.C. 1' - 6" O.C. 1'-6" Overhang 15' - 0" O.C. 0' - 7" O.C. 2' - 3" O.C. 1 PERGOLA ENLARGEMENT PLAN SCALE 4" 1 = 1' - 0" 2 PERGOLA SECTION SCALE 4" 1 = 1' - 0" 3 PERGOLA SECTION SCALE 4" 1 = 1' - 0" GUEST HOUSE 1X2 LATTICE SLAT 2X8 PRESSURE TREATED 6X6 POST 10' - 0" 2" 14' - 6" O.C. 0' - 7 1 2" O.C. 2' - 3" O.C. 10' - 0" 33' - 1 12 " 1' - 6" O.C. 11' - 10 3 4" 9' - 4" 11' - 10 34 " 10' - 4 3 4" 10' - 4 34 " 0' - 4 12 " 1X2 LATTICE SLAT 2X8 PRESSURE TREATED LUMBER 2X8 PRESSURE TREATED LUMBER 6X6 POST 3 2 6X6 POST 1X2 LATTICE SLAT 2X8 LUMBER GUEST HOUSE 5 6 PERGOLA TAIL DETAIL SCALE 1" = 1' - 0" 0' - 1 1 2" 0' - 7" 0' - 2" 2" PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT Right: Construction drawings showing details of the per-gola. Section S-1 Section S-2
  • 21. Legend Upstate Gateway Trail Pickens Parcels Oconee Parcels Greenville Parcels State Park Campground Trailhead/Access Upstate Gateway Regional Design Oconee, Pickens, and Greenville Counties South Carolina Fall 2013 The Upstate Gateway is a trail system designed for mountain bikes that spans the three upstate counties of Oconee, Pickens, and Greenville. This trail system will provide a great opportu-nity to the upstate. It will give residents of the upstate a gateway to the upstate and its great potential through biking. These opportunities in-clude exploring the vast ecotourism opportuni-ties, great and varied geography, and historical points of interest. Features include a central hub that is located for optimum accessibility. At the Greenville county terminal, there is a downhill course that spreads across the north face of Paris Mountain. Facilities along the trail system will include bathrooms, water fountains, park-ing, rest areas, picnic areas, and campsites. Before the design process, land analysis was necessary in order to find optimal site and trail locations. A couple key factors included locat-ing important urban and population areas as well as analyzing the regions slope. Right: Master plan of the Upstate Gateway Moun-tain bike trail. Trail system features include a central hub located outside of Ea-sley with access points and campgrounds along the entire trail.. The detail in the bottom right shows an en-largement of a typical sec-tion of trail in order to show how the trail conforms to the natural topography 38 RISH 39
  • 22. Legend Upstate Gateway Trail Picnic Area Parking Lot Trailhead Facility Roadway BMX Park 12 mile Creek Golden Creek Baptist Church Central Hub Site Plan Central Hub Perspective Miles Miles Miles Miles Legend Growth Suitability Low Medium-Low Medium Medium-High High Legend Environmental Suitability Miles High Medium-High Medium Medium-Low Low GIS Analysis Element Maps Suitability Maps CAESARS HEAD STATE PARK KEOWEE TOXAWAY STATE PARK Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø ØØ Miles ! Miles Legend Cultural Suitability Low Medium-Low Medium Medium-High High p Miles §¨ Miles PLEASANT RIDGE STATE PARK MCPHERSON PARK Legend n Miles Ø Miles Miles CAESARS HEAD STATE PARK PLEASANT RIDGE STATE PARK MCPHERSON PARK Legend Recreational Suitability !H !H !H Miles Agriculture Facilities River Creek Drainage Lake Watershed Basins Deciduous Evergreen Mixed Pasture Crops KEOWEE TOXAWAY STATE PARK Miles !Z !Z !Z !Z !Z !Z Ø !Z !Z Ø Ø Low Medium-Low Medium Medium-High High Miles Legend Cultural Suitability Miles Legend Growth Suitability Low Medium-Low Medium Medium-High High p 0 2.5 5 10 15 20 Miles Miles Low Medium-Low Medium Medium-High High p Miles These GIS maps show the many different layers and stages of analy-sis important to mountain biking + + + + ²¸ ²¸ ²¸ Ø Ø !Z !Z !Z!Z!Z Ø ØØ Ø !Z !Z !Z !Z 0 2.5 5 10 15 20 Miles Legend Tree Canopy Coverage Miles Legend Severe Slope Low Slope Limited Moderate High 40 RISH 41 Legend Severe Slope Legend Agricultural Suitability High Medium-High Medium Medium-Low Low 0 2.5 5 10 15 20 p Legend Cultural Suitability Low Medium-Low Medium Medium-High High p 0 2.5 5 10 15 20 p 0 2 4 8 12 16 p 0 2.5 5 10 15 20 Legend Recreational Suitability Low Medium-Low Medium Medium-High High p 0 2.5 5 10 15 20 Legend Cultural Suitability Low Medium-Low Medium Medium-High High p 0 2.5 5 10 15 20 0 2.5 5 10 15 20 §¨ ¦ I385 ¦ I85 §¨ ¦ I185 Legend High Power Transmission Line Major Roads Railroad Interstate Highway Airport Low Intensity Residential High Intensity Residential Commercial/Industrial Industrial Park Urban Area p 0 2.5 5 10 15 20 n | n | TABLE ROCK STATE PARK OCONEE STATE PARK PARIS MOUNTAIN STATE PARK CLEVELAND PARK GANTT MEMORIAL PARK GOWER ESTATES PARK ! H H ! H ! | Marina Boat Launch/Ramp Golf Course ! H Bike Trails Streams ! ! Palmetto_Trail1 Lakes Park National Forest p 0 2 4 8 12 16 Legend Agriculture Facilities River Creek Drainage Lake Watershed Basins Deciduous Evergreen Mixed Pasture Crops 0 2.5 5 10 15 20 Ø p Ø ² ¸ ² ! Z ! Z ! ! Legend ! Z Historical Site ² ¸ Attractions Ø Hospital Fire Department "E& Health Clinic ¹ º High School Æ c Library School Districts School Districts Pickens Oconee Greenville p 0 2.5 5 10 15 20 Legend Agricultural Suitability High Medium-High Medium Medium-Low Low 0 2.5 5 10 15 20 p Legend Cultural Suitability Low Medium-Low Medium Medium-High High p 0 2.5 5 10 15 20 Legend Environmental Suitability p 0 2.5 5 10 15 20 Legend Cultural Suitability Low Medium-Low Medium Medium-High High p 0 2.5 5 10 15 20 0 2.5 5 10 15 20 Growth + Infrastructure + Landcover + Transportation Recreation + Parks + Trails + Water recreation Agriculture + Hydrography + Landcover + Woodlands Culture + Education + Health and Safety + Religion and History Environment + Slope + Animanl Habitat + Tree Canopy Cover Ø Ø ²¸ ²¸ ²¸ ²¸ ²¸ !Z !Z !Z !Z !Z !Z !Z !Z !Z !Z !Z !Z !Z!Z !Z !Z !Z !Z !Z !Z !Z !Z !Z !Z !Z Legend !Z Historical Site ²¸ Attractions Ø Hospital Fire Department "E& Health Clinic ¹º High School Æc Library School Districts School Districts Pickens Oconee Greenville p 0 2.5 5 10 15 20 p 0 2 4 8 12 16 Miles p n| n| TABLE ROCK STATE PARK OCONEE STATE PARK PARIS MOUNTAIN STATE PARK CLEVELAND PARK GANTT MEMORIAL PARK GOWER ESTATES PARK !H Legend n| Marina Boat Launch/Ramp Golf Course !H Bike Trails Streams ! ! Palmetto_Trail1 Lakes Park National Forest p 0 2 4 8 12 16 §¨¦I385 §¨¦I185 Legend High Power Transmission Line Major Roads Railroad Interstate Highway Airport Low Intensity Residential High Intensity Residential Commercial/Industrial Industrial Park Urban Area p 0 2.5 5 10 15 20
  • 23. 42 RISH 43 Sections from top to bottom: Expert Intermediate Easy Beginner http://blog.oregonlive.com/ultimate-northwest/2009/05/large_Mountain- http://www.bootlegcanyon.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/bcmap.png http://www.imba. http://www.cheapmtb.com/images/2010/12/Mountain-Bike-iamge.jpgcom/model-trails/ Paris Mountain Downhill Course Perspective Paris Mountain Downhill Course Section Profiles Legend Upstate Gateway Chairlift Beginner Easy Intermediate Expert
  • 24. 0.8750 1.8750 The Flex Mini Project Asheville, North Carolina Summer 2014 The Flex was a very short project that was as-signed 44 RISH 45 0.2500 28.2500 18.0000 31.9250 while taking part in the Asheville Design Center’s design-build course. Each design-build member was tasked with designing and fabricating an object that could be used by the children of the YWCA of Asheville. Our only con-straint for the object was that it must be built from a single board of quarter-inch plywood and a single two-by-four. I began my design process by thinking about what young children like to do, and realized it is not any one thing. With this in mind, I knew I wanted to create something that would fuel their creativity and not appeal to any preconceived notions. This inspired me to create something that could be jumped on, crawled on, or sat on. The final project turned out to be very strong due to its triangulation in multiple directions, despite it being constructed of only quarter-inch thick plywood. The Flex was also surprisingly comfortable to lounge on due to its curvature that was achieved by the geometry of the opposing triangle frames. The end-product proved to be a favorite with the children, all using it in different ways. Right: I constructed the flex using slats of quarter inch plywood oriented vertically for strength. For the trian-gular frames, I had to con-struct a jig and use a dado blade in order to make slots for the slats set at the cor-rect angle. The panorama on the bottom shows the teams’ projects together.
  • 25. Schouwburgplein Case Study Rotterdam, Netherlands Spring 2012 Schouwburgplein is a plaza located in the city of Rotterdam in the Netherlands. It is an exist-ing plaza designed by West 8, and was part of my case study. The main focus was the textural quality of the plaza. West 8 used many different materials in order to complement its surround-ings. Another important feature of the square are the towering crane-like lights that users can even control and move to predetermined posi-tions. As part of the case study, I was tasked with making a model that conveyed Schouwburg-plein. I used several different materials in order to convey the varied textures including balsa wood, sandpaper, foam, wire clothes hangers painted red, and even spaghetti. 46 RISH 47
  • 26. PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT Left Page: Sections showing the proposed fountain, hardtop play area, and breezeway. Below: Perspectives showing the fountain and hardtop play areas Right: Small diagram showing the existing site and rendered master plan Seneca Middle Site Design Seneca, South Carolina Fall 2011 Seneca Middle School provided a unique op-portunity to design a recess area for younger children. For this assignment, we were grouped into teams of four or five. Each member then designed a specific area of the school which in-cluded the North, South, West, East, or central courtyards of the school. I was tasked with the South side of school which was the recess area for sixth and seventh graders which also dou-bled as their afterschool pickup area. Existing, there was simply a large asphalt area with sev-eral basketball goals. This project gave me the chance to design a play area which included a small grass field, foursquare, a miniature pond, and plenty of seating and space to socialize in the shade. 48 RISH 49