User-Centric Design of Series 40 Apps
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User-Centric Design of Series 40 Apps

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Putting the user at the heart of your app designs is the key to creating winning apps. This webinar will walk you through a design example focusing on helping a user determine where they are, to ...

Putting the user at the heart of your app designs is the key to creating winning apps. This webinar will walk you through a design example focusing on helping a user determine where they are, to facilitate the use of a location based application for Series 40 Touch and Type phones. After giving an overview of the available methods for determining the user’s location, the webinar will discuss some of the fundamental drivers behind mobile apps design, such as user mind set, use context, and small screen limitations. Armed with this knowledge, the webinar will explore practical design implementations to enable the user to estimate their location, with a focus on the ways in which you can translate technology into an easy-to-use application. The presentation concludes with an overview of the Series 40 UI design tools and services offered by Nokia to help you deliver winning app design. Overall, this session guides you on how to make complex technology accessible to Series 40 users.

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  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • These slides are general useful for mobile design, not only for Nokia S40.
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  • Add settings about The fuzziness where a user is Downtown In town Street name and number off
  • Could work e.g. for billing Your home radio stack is cheaper than others – e.g. To replace the feeling of a land line phone Distance:?
  • U-TDOA – Uplink Time Difference of Arrival A high-yield, high-performance location technology, TruePosition's Uplink Time Difference of Arrival (U-TDOA), relies upon multilateration, using cell towers, which makes U-TDOA especially well suited for indoor and urban environments. Because it is completely network based (calculating location based on a normal cellular signal) no additional chip or software needs to be installed into the handset, which means U-TDOA can locate every mobile phone anywhere. U-TDOA determines a mobile phone's location by comparing the times at which a cell signal reaches multiple Location Measurement Units (LMUs) installed at the operator's base stations. Accuracy is determined by the network layout and deployment density of LMUs to Base Transceiver Stations (BTSs). U-TDOA technology works very well in urban, suburban, and indoor environments — suffering only in extreme rural conditions where the cell sites are arranged in a "string of pearls" configuration. In such scenarios, TruePosition can supplement its U-TDOA technology with Angle of Arrival (AOA) technology, which computes locations based on the angle at which signal reached two base stations. TDOA should not be confused with Time of Arrival or TOA. Even though a TDOA call flow would look virtually the same as a TOA call flow, there is a difference in how the location is calculated. TDOA and TOA are similar, but there is a difference. TOA differs in the fact that it uses the absolute time of arrival at a certain base station rather than the difference between two stations. The distance can be directly calculated from the time of arrival because signals travel with a known velocity. Time of arrival data from two base stations will narrow a position to two points and data from a third base station is required to resolve the precise position. U-TDOA Highlights Extremely valuable for "mission critical" applications where every phone must be able to be located, in every environment, such as safety and security ( E112, E9-1-1 , personal emergency location , asset tracking , mobile surveillance , and more) Location available for start-of-call, mid-call, or when idle Locates both voice and SMS messaging Completely network-based; no additional chip or software needs to be installed into the handset, meaning it can locate all mobile phones Calculating the line-of-sight path from the transmitter to receiver, AOA (Angle of Arrival) provides location services in areas of sparse cell site density, or where cell sites are arranged linearly, for example, along a stretch of highway. AOA "At-A-Glance" AOA (Angle of Arrival) uses multiple receivers (2 or more) to locate a phone AOA yield is 99% Accuracy varies, but can get sub-100 meters Speed and direction of travel is available AOA (Angle of Arrival) functions for any phone The Angle of Arrival (AOA) method uses an antenna containing a multiple element array in which the exact location of each AOA (Angle of Arrival) element is known precisely. Each element is small and capable of receiving a separate signal. By measuring signal strength, time of arrival, and phase at each element of the array, it is possible to calculate the line-of-sight path from transmitter to receiver. Placing another receiver with the same antenna configuration in a different location allows you to repeat the process. The intersection point of the two line-of-sight paths represents the location of the transmitting mobile phone. Such conditions arise typically in areas of sparse cell site density, or where cell sites are arranged linearly, for example, along a stretch of highway. In such cases one or two sectors (of a sectored antenna) will need AOA (Angle of Arrival) enhancement. Like U-TDOA, AOA (Angle of Arrival) requires specialized receivers at the base stations in addition to the construction of directional antenna arrays on the existing cell tower. (trueposition.com)
  • - Requires network coverage AOA 50 m – 200 m TDOA 30 m – 50 m
  • Assisted GPS is faster than GPS but it comes with costs First the phone must be enabled The information is send via the network – data traffic Gets easily expensive when roaming and new position every minute as a first fix Do not mess with the A-GPS server setting Assisted GPS , generally abbreviated as A-GPS or aGPS , is a system which can, under certain conditions, improve the startup performance, or time-to-first-fix (TTFF) of a GPS satellite-based positioning system. It is used extensively with GPS-capable cellular phones as its development was accelerated by the U.S. FCC 's 911 mandate making the location of a cell phone available to emergency call dispatchers. [1] Contents   [ hide ]  1 Description 2 Basic concepts 3 Modes of operation 4 Standards 5 See also 6 References [ edit ] Description "Standalone" or "Autonomous" GPS operation uses radio signals from satellites alone. A-GPS additionally uses network resources to locate and use the satellites in poor signal conditions. In very poor signal conditions, for example in a city, these signals may suffer multipath propagation where signals bounce off buildings, or be weakened by passing through atmospheric conditions, walls or tree cover. When first turned on in these conditions, some standalone GPS navigation devices may not be able to work out a position due to the fragmentary signal, rendering them unable to function until a clear signal can be received continuously for up to 12.5 minutes (the time needed to download the GPS almanac and ephemeris ). [2] An Assisted GPS system can address these problems by using data available from a network. For billing purposes, network providers often count this as a data access, which can cost money depending on the plan. [3] Assistance falls into two categories: Information used to more quickly acquire satellites It can supply orbital data or almanac for the GPS satellites to the GPS receiver, enabling the GPS receiver to lock to the satellites more rapidly in some cases. The network can provide precise time. Calculation of position by the server using information from the GPS receiver The device captures a snapshot of the GPS signal, with approximate time, for the server to later process into a position. The assistance server has a good satellite signal, and plentiful computation power, so it can compare fragmentary signals relayed to it Accurate, surveyed coordinates for the cell site towers allow better knowledge of local ionospheric conditions and other conditions affecting the GPS signal than the GPS receiver alone, enabling more precise calculation of position. (See also Wide Area Augmentation System ) As an additional benefit, in some A-GPS device implementations, known as "MS-Assisted," the amount of CPU and programming required for a GPS receiver is reduced by offloading most of the work onto the assistance server. A typical A-GPS-enabled receiver will use a data connection (Internet or other) to contact the assistance server for aGPS information. If it also has functioning autonomous GPS, it may use standalone GPS, which is sometimes slower on time to first fix , but does not depend on the network, and therefore can work beyond network range, and without incurring data usage fees. [3] Some aGPS devices do not have the option of falling back to standalone or autonomous GPS. Many mobile phones combine A-GPS and other location services including Wi-Fi Positioning System and cell-site triangulation and sometimes a hybrid positioning system . [4] High Sensitivity GPS is an allied technology that addresses some of these issues in a way that does not require additional infrastructure. However, unlike some forms of A-GPS, high-sensitivity GPS cannot provide a fix instantaneously when the GPS receiver has been off for some time. [ citation needed ] [ edit ] Basic concepts Standalone GPS provides first position in approximately 30-40 seconds. A Standalone GPS system needs orbital information of the satellites to calculate the current position. The data rate of the satellite signal is only 50 b/s, so downloading orbital information like ephemeris and almanac directly from satellites typically takes a long time, and if the satellite signals are lost during the acquisition of this information, it is discarded and the standalone system has to start from scratch. In AGPS, the Network Operator deploys an AGPS server . These AGPS servers download the orbital information from the satellite and store it in the database. An AGPS capable device can connect to these servers and download this information using Mobile Network radio bearers such as GSM , CDMA , WCDMA , LTE or even using other wireless radio bearers such as Wi-Fi . Usually the data rate of these bearers is high, hence downloading orbital information takes less time. [ edit ] Modes of operation AGPS has two modes of operation: Mobile Station Assisted (MSA) - In MSA mode A-GPS operation, the A-GPS capable device receives acquisition assistance, reference time and other optional assistance data from the A-GPS server. With the help of the above data, the A-GPS device receives signals from the visible satellites and sends the measurements to the A-GPS server. The A-GPS server calculates the position and sends it back to the A-GPS device. Mobile Station Based (MSB) - In MSB mode A-GPS operation, the A-GPS device receives ephemeris, reference location, reference time and other optional assistance data from the A-GPS server. With the help of the above data, the A-GPS device receives signals from the visible satellites and calculates the position. [ edit ] Standards AGPS protocols are part of Positioning Protocol defined by two different standardization body, 3gpp and Open Mobile Alliance(OMA) . Control Plane Protocol - It is defined by 3gpp for various generations of mobile phone system. These protocols are defined for Circuit Switched Networks. Following positioning protocol has been defined. RRLP - 3gpp defined RRLP or Radio resource location protocol to support positioning protocol on GSM networks. TIA 801 - CDMA2000 family defined this protocol for CDMA 2000 networks. RRC position protocol - 3gpp defined this protocol as part of the RRC standard for UMTS network. LPP - 3gpp defined LPP or LTE positioning protocol for LTE Networks. User Plane Protocol - It is defined by OMA to support positioning protocols in Packet Switched Networks. Two generations of User plane Protocol have evolved. SUPL V1.0 SUPL V2.0
  • Needs wifi nodes with location servers Needs accurate location of nodes Ubiquitous wifi is an amercan dream Used in galleries and museums 5-20 m Bad avaialablity
  • Sky scrapers Lightning houses Hills Phone boxes Bus stops – bus stop numbers Street names/corners/intersections/numbers Basically everything what permamnently stands out of the landscape Business names Databases go out of date Can be hard to enter with a mobile, requires extra features for automation Multiple locations possible Might help in urban locations,
  • Dead reckoning Accelerometers, electronic compass, highly accurate reckoning of relative position Needs an accurate location (and time source) to start with As good as the initial lock Everywhere available Accelerometer and decoding
  • NFC vs Bluetooth 4.0 / Bluetooth Low Energy
  • NFC vs Bluetooth 4.0 / Bluetooth Low Energy
  • Ask somebody Broadcast TV/radio triangulation Needs reception of 3 different locations  not likely in many areas Accuracy 50 m IP lookup currently uninformative Location street signs Dedicated street signs for geolocatopn Nice idea in principle Installed in London by taxi company Geowarchalking Grafitti Spray/paint stickers
  • Nice example would be location based reminder Requires low power First could be cell ID  3-5 minutes walk Second could GPS to show the map if user wants to go
  • Point behind: You want to send the link to somebody very easy The best would be if the one is shown in a list on top, or already filled as a recipient and you just have to press send. The radar visual representation is not stable for extreme situations, like many people.
  • Point behind: You want to send the link to somebody very easy The best would be if the one is shown in a list on top, or already filled as a recipient and you just have to press send. The radar visual representation is not stable for extreme situations, like many people.

User-Centric Design of Series 40 Apps Presentation Transcript

  • 1. UX for Location Based ServicesSeries 40 Touch and Type Webinars 20121 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 2. Overview• What to take into account when designing for mobile• Methods to estimate your own location• Transform technical data into information for people • Basics • Showcase ”Radar”• Series 40 UX design tools• Take home messages2 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 3. UX considerations3 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 4. Three mobile mindsets: - bored - microtasking - local (Josh Clark)4 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 5. Your application’s target audience is onthe move, not in the comfy chair.5 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 6. Your application will be used withthumbs only.6 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 7. Use the fastest UI component, not thefanciest one.7 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 8. Do not overload your screen.8 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 9. Allow privacy.9 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 10. Location estimation10 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 11. Cell ID might not represent the nearestmobile network antenna.11 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 12. Time Difference of Arrival and Angle ofArrival require special networks. TDOA AOA12 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 13. AOA and TDOA work indoors butalways with limited precision.13 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 14. GPS might require too long time for thefirst fix – too long for the impatient.14 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 15. Wi-Fi triangulation can work locallyindoors and with high precision.15 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 16. Landmarks and urban marks can offerprecise location data. D16 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 17. Dead reckoning is only as good as theinitial lock and errors sum up.17 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 18. RFID tags can deliver a high accuracyfor an initial lock or for refinement.18 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 19. RFID tags also work as electronicleashes.19 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 20. For other navigation methods it mightbe a long way into the phone.20 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 21. Combine navigation methods for fastaquiring and refining navigation.21 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 22. Showcase RADAR22 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 23. Assumptions for a new feature:Main use cases:- Send an image link to somebody located close to you- Choose 1 or 2 recipients out of multipleAvailable data:- Dynamic distance to other people- Dynamic direction to other people- Phone connection to other people23 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 24. This sounds like a Radar.24 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 25. Learn to step back and observe thewhole thing. What does the user need?25 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 26. Do not overload the screen.26 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 27. Transfer raw location data into a simplecontext – not a fancy context. The left shows an area with many people, the middle shows the representation in a phone, but the phone screen is too small to show all the content and something has to be cropped, the right image shows a simple list.27 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 28. Transfer raw location data into a simplecontext – not a fancy context. The left shows an area with many people, the middle shows the representation in a phone, but the phone screen is too small to show all the content and something has to be cropped, the right image shows a simple list.28 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 29. Utilize relative positions and orientationto sort results. Tina and Jo are in front of me, so they are likely to be the ones I am interacting with, Qing and Tom are behind me, so thet are not likely to talk to me but somebody else.29 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 30. Test early and often.Fail fast and cheap.30 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 31. Series 40 UX design tools31 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 32. Create high fidelity paper prototypeswith Illustrator, Fireworks or Inkscape.32 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 33. Create a launcher icon for a positivefirst impression (AI, PS, Inkscape).33 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 34. Take a look into the style guides tomaintain Series 40 look and feel.34 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 35. The UX checklist helps you avoid themost common design mistakes.35 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 36. Take home messages36 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 37. Your application’s target audience is onthe move, not in the comfy chair.37 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 38. Learn to step back and observe thewhole thing. What does the user need?38 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 39. Use our services to improve the overallrating of your application.39 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 40. Linkshttp://www.developer.nokia.com/Resources/Library/Design_and_UX/#!designing-for-nokia-platforms/designing-for-series-40-touch-and-type.html- Style guides- Icon creation- Stencil setshttp://www.developer.nokia.com/info/sw.nokia.com/id/515ca91b-1160-4841-a1f7-ca821c21b81e/UX_Checklist_for_Series_40.html- UX Checklist40 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 41. Credits •Anne Kivimaa •Sanna Häiväläinen •Sami Ronkainen •Philip Wamsley 41 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber
  • 42. Thank you.42 © Nokia 2012 User-centric-design-of-Series-40-apps.pptx v. 0.1 2012-05-02 Jan Krebber