Water & Peace:A challenge toRotarians Ron Denham, Chair  Water & Sanitation Rotarian Action GroupJim Goodrich, President, ...
How can there be Peace with suchdisparity? • 900 million people (one in six) are denied   access to safe water • 2.5 billi...
Or, when lack of safe water andsanitation leads to:• 8,000 people dying every day• 250 children dying every hour• 50% of A...
Or, when:• African women spend 40 billion hours  annually collecting and hauling water.• Women and children (usually girls...
What can be expected, when in:•   Sub-Saharan Africa   47%•   East Asia            29%•   South Asia           28%•   Midd...
“Many of today’s conflicts around theworld are being fuelled by watershortages… Increasingly, fights areerupting over such...
For example:• 300,000 farmers in Orissa demonstrate  against water allocation.• Israel and Palestine dispute over aquifers...
Rotarians’ WASH projects are bringingpeace to many communities:                                 Country        Projects   ...
They are responding to every imaginable need:                                      Bore holesDug wells
Rainwater harvesting                       Household                       filters and                       purification
SODIS(Solar Water Disinfection)
Building earth andconcrete dams                 Installing pipelines/                 distribution systems
ksToilet bloc                 Latrines
In Togo Rotarians brought peace wherepreviously there was hostility:• Insufficient water had led to conflict.• With Rotari...
A Rotarian-created oasis in Haiti enabled thecommunity to resist guerrillas:• Land was flooded to make way for a power pla...
Quality of life for Indian villagers dramaticallyimproved by a Rotary water project:• A community eked out a bare existenc...
A Rotary water-based development program inKenya brought peace to the community: • The women of Nakuru trekked miles for w...
Rotary irrigation project in AndhraPradesh brought peace to the village:• 5000 villagers in perpetual conflict over shorta...
Rotarians bring peace to communitiesbecause they take a “bottom-up,holistic approach:•   Focus on helping the community, n...
You can help to bring peace to theworld:     Click on: www.wasrag.orgJoin thousands of Rotarians improvinglife and livelih...
Water & peace  a challenge to rotarians
Water & peace  a challenge to rotarians
Water & peace  a challenge to rotarians
Water & peace  a challenge to rotarians
Water & peace  a challenge to rotarians
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Water & peace a challenge to rotarians

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Rotary Conference at UNESCO 2012
Session on Water and Peace
Rotary & Water by Ron Denham, chairman of the Water and Sanitation Rotarian Action Group

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  • UNICEF/HQ06-0160/Michael Kamber SOMALIA: A nomadic child and woman carry containers of water collected from a large puddle in the middle of the road near the town of Wajid in the southern Bakool Region. The puddle, which appeared after a rare day of rain, is contaminated by waste products from the animals that also drink from it. Still, it is the only available water source and the people will camp nearby until it is gone.
  • UNICEF/HQ06-0149 Michael Kamber SOMALIA: Nomadic girls and women carry containers of water collected from a large puddle in the middle of the road near the town of Wajid in the southern Bakool Region. The puddle, which appeared after a rare day of rain, is contaminated by waste products from the animals that also drink from it. Still, it is the only available water source and the people will camp nearby until it is gone.
  • Ron Denham file photograph (Kenya?) Each day the women, and young girls set out from the villages to bring back water. They often walk several kms-an average of 6kms. The source may be a river, a creek, a pond, or maybe a well.
  • In this case the source was a mud hole in the dried up bed of a river where she scoops up the muddy water into the jerry can ready for the trek back to the village.
  • And then begins the trek back to the village. This is likely the first of several treks per day. The jerry can holds 20 litres of water, sufficient for one or two members of the family. But the typical family in Kenya has 10 members. Think about it-at least five trips perday. Look at the poor girls face—exhaustion. 20 litres, 20 kgs, plus the weight of the can—more than many of us in this room could lift, let alone carry for 6kms, several times a day
  • Or, think of this poor boy, drinking directly from this polluted pond filled with all kinds of micro-organisms, pathogens, bugs etc. Hardly surprising that the rate of infant mortality of children under age 5 is well over 100 per 1000 live births
  • The statistics are alarming. And when we say one in six lack access we do not mean that the other 5 in six have a faucet in the kitchen or bathroom or a water point in the back yard. No, it means a water point within 300 metres. So, even those who, according to WHO statistics have access, don ’t have access the way you and I think about it
  • These umbers invariably shock people. The media don ’t tell the story. If a jet plane were to crash killing 250 people we ’d hear about it fpor years to come—witness Lockerbie, 28 years later. Yet, every day the equivalent of 25 jumbo jets crash—but it is never reported. One thing we, as Rotarians, can do is to talk to the ,media, tell them about this reality when ever we have the opportunity. In africa, 50% of hospital beds are filled with people suffering from water-related disease. And HHIV/AIDS for example—iit weakens a person ’s immune system so they fall sick and die form an opportunistic infection.
  • Read slide, Comment-think what it would mean to Africa if these hours could be spent on value adding tasks-building the infrastructure, highways etc, cultivating the land, raising livestock, sewing garments, running the equivalent of a small convenience store
  • After showing this slide I touch on some of the issues. I include the USA wher there is conflict between USA and Mexico over the Rio Grande. Ialso mention the Ogallala aquifer, being depleted egregiously. Other transboundary issues-the nile (Ethiopia, Sudan, Egypt), Euphrates (Turkey, Syria, Iraq, Iran) wher conflict exists over allaocation In India I mention conflict between farmers and industry (Orissa) If you can think of local issues in the UK tht would add to the argument Then speak to the need for every club to get involved in a project. It could be small—putting 1000 pounds into a borehole project led by another club. At the other extreme taking the lead role in a hundreds of thousands of pounds major program to bring safe water and integrated socio-economic development to a watershed, river basin, or country
  • Read slide, Comment-think what it would mean to Africa if these hours could be spent on value adding tasks-building the infrastructure, highways etc, cultivating the land, raising livestock, sewing garments, running the equivalent of a small convenience store
  • Read slide, Comment-think what it would mean to Africa if these hours could be spent on value adding tasks-building the infrastructure, highways etc, cultivating the land, raising livestock, sewing garments, running the equivalent of a small convenience store
  • Just highlight the numbers. This is to demonstrate the extent of our work. Highlight some UK/RIBI projects if you can
  • Qiuick read. Then I speak about rainwater harvesting being the truly sustainable way of bringing water to people.-Rooftop catchment, school area catchment. Recharging wells also important wher we use RWH Under filters I often mention SODIS as an example that we do not have to spend big money to achive good results Some major opportiunities for Toilets/latrines in schools as a means of encouraging girls to stay in school
  • President Ray Klinginsmith has exhorted us to do Bigger, better, bolder What are the implications
  • As we saw earlier, water is the key to every aspect of humandevelopment. But, how many of your clubs are so engaged (this is where I quote 20 of 65 clubs). You need your own data—from oyur district, from RIBI whetever But don ’t use these numbers they will be irrelevant. If you can ’t get appropriate data delete this line Isolated project—a well for example. No economies of scale, no standardisation of spares or proceses Other organizations-you could mention WaterAid as a partner, or “Drop in the Bucket” or other NGO, or government agency DfID RCC-extend the range of Rotary clubs to places wher no Rotary club exists Outside funders aren ’t interested in processing a few thousand pounds. But, ask for a million and a meaningful partnership evolves
  • Unsustainability is Rotary clubs achilles heel. We go into a rural area, drill awell, build a pieline and then leave. No consideration of behaviour change, training, supply chain for spares etc We focus on an activity—drilling a borehole, without any thought to the horizontal benefits-health, literacy, economic self sufficincy etc Too often the international partner will “own” the project, not letting the host club and community make the important decisions Too often the international partner, e.g. a club in the UK decides what ’s the best solution for a community they’ve never visited No provision for follow-up after completion. How do we know whether the well is still functioning seven years later? As was stated by the speaker from UNICEF 70% of water projects fail within the first 5 years.
  • Think multiyear programs to bring about the transformation of a watershed, or region. Focus on outcomes-water is a means to an end, not the end in itself Form consortiums, leverage other organisations Even though Th=e Rotary Foundation doesn ’t allow for paying a project manager, we must recognise that if we want someone, a Rotarian or other, to manage a program for several years w e need to changeour thinking re compensation (Treat this gently, some diehard Rotarians may be in the audience. I get away with it because I can quote meny examples from our partners)
  • The things Wasrag can do to help. This nis where you give the sales plug. Add to it liberally from your own expeience and views of Wasrag
  • This where we tell the audience hat we want of them Lay it on as thick as you feel comfortable You might want to mention Start with Water That ’s about it. Bets of luck—I know it will go well, Ron
  • This where we tell the audience hat we want of them Lay it on as thick as you feel comfortable You might want to mention Start with Water That ’s about it. Bets of luck—I know it will go well, Ron
  • Water & peace a challenge to rotarians

    1. 1. Water & Peace:A challenge toRotarians Ron Denham, Chair Water & Sanitation Rotarian Action GroupJim Goodrich, President, Rotary Club of Groveland, CA March 2012
    2. 2. How can there be Peace with suchdisparity? • 900 million people (one in six) are denied access to safe water • 2.5 billion have no safe sanitation • We who have water, pollute and waste indiscriminately
    3. 3. Or, when lack of safe water andsanitation leads to:• 8,000 people dying every day• 250 children dying every hour• 50% of African hospital beds being filled with water-related cases
    4. 4. Or, when:• African women spend 40 billion hours annually collecting and hauling water.• Women and children (usually girls) spend up to six hours per day fetching water.• Families spend up to 25% of their income to purchase water.• Slum dwellers pay ten times more for their water than the upper classes!!!
    5. 5. What can be expected, when in:• Sub-Saharan Africa 47%• East Asia 29%• South Asia 28%• Middle-East 18%• Latin America 18%are denied access to these essentialsof life?
    6. 6. “Many of today’s conflicts around theworld are being fuelled by watershortages… Increasingly, fights areerupting over such basic human needs aswater and arable land. Ban Ki-moon, February, 2008
    7. 7. For example:• 300,000 farmers in Orissa demonstrate against water allocation.• Israel and Palestine dispute over aquifers.• Coca-Cola v. the people (Kerala)• Riots over water allocation in Tamil Nadu• International disputes within watersheds• Egypt v. Sudan vs. Ethiopia over the Nile
    8. 8. Rotarians’ WASH projects are bringingpeace to many communities: Country Projects India 212 Indonesia 35 Philippines 50 Thailand 38 Other 90 Country ProjectsCountry Projects Burkina Faso 5Bolivia 12 Cameroun 9Dom. Rep. 17 Ghana 25Ecuador 32 Kenya 55Guatemala 25 Malawi 10Haiti 27 Nigeria 21Honduras 51 South Africa 27Mexico 55 Tanzania 15Nicaragua 11 Uganda 58Peru 18 Zambia 29Other 57 Other 100
    9. 9. They are responding to every imaginable need: Bore holesDug wells
    10. 10. Rainwater harvesting Household filters and purification
    11. 11. SODIS(Solar Water Disinfection)
    12. 12. Building earth andconcrete dams Installing pipelines/ distribution systems
    13. 13. ksToilet bloc Latrines
    14. 14. In Togo Rotarians brought peace wherepreviously there was hostility:• Insufficient water had led to conflict.• With Rotarian guidance, local people dug wells.• Women shared in the inauguration with libations and thanks to ancestors and to God.• Availability of sufficient water eliminated conflicts; peace prevailed
    15. 15. A Rotarian-created oasis in Haiti enabled thecommunity to resist guerrillas:• Land was flooded to make way for a power plant.• Farmers were forced up the mountain where they starved.• Rotarians helped install a hydraulic pump system.• Community became self-sufficient – able to resist Haitian guerrillas• The area has experienced sustained growth, other areas have floundered.
    16. 16. Quality of life for Indian villagers dramaticallyimproved by a Rotary water project:• A community eked out a bare existence growing rice, taking advantage of the monsoon rains.• The Rotary club of Mumbai built check dams, stopped the water and recharged the wells.• Villagers now grow three high-value cash crops.• This prosperity enabled the community to open a clinic and launch micro-businesses – the community is at peace.
    17. 17. A Rotary water-based development program inKenya brought peace to the community: • The women of Nakuru trekked miles for water each day. • The local Rotary club helped the community to launch a rainwater harvesting program. • Obliged to share resources and work together, the villagers cooperated to install the systems. • Harmony replaced hostility; communities are at peace.
    18. 18. Rotary irrigation project in AndhraPradesh brought peace to the village:• 5000 villagers in perpetual conflict over shortage of resources.• Rotarians met with community leaders and agreed on the real needs.• Result: an $80,000 irrigation scheme bringing water to 300 acres and benefitting 100 families.• Peace came with Rotary intervention in a community water project.
    19. 19. Rotarians bring peace to communitiesbecause they take a “bottom-up,holistic approach:• Focus on helping the community, not just supplying water and sanitation.• Understand and build on local culture.• Involve ALL stakeholders – especially women.• Empower the community• Ensure sustainability
    20. 20. You can help to bring peace to theworld: Click on: www.wasrag.orgJoin thousands of Rotarians improvinglife and livelihood through theprovision of safe water andsanitation!!!

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