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Evaluating Information
Evaluating Information
Evaluating Information
Evaluating Information
Evaluating Information
Evaluating Information
Evaluating Information
Evaluating Information
Evaluating Information
Evaluating Information
Evaluating Information
Evaluating Information
Evaluating Information
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Evaluating Information

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Presentation for Sussex Downs College access students, 19/05/08

Presentation for Sussex Downs College access students, 19/05/08

Published in: Economy & Finance, Education
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Transcript

  • 1. Finding and evaluating Information Nigel Gibson
  • 2. How do I know that it’s useful?
    • The world is full of information
    • Some is good and valid
    • Some is less credible
    • It’s important to find ways of deciding which is which!
  • 3. PROMPT
    • One way to assess information is to apply the PROMPT test:
      • Presentation
      • Relevance
      • Objectivity
      • Method
      • Provenance
      • Timeliness
  • 4. Presentation
    • The way in which information is presented can have an effect on the way we receive and perceive it
    • The old saying ‘you can’t judge a book by its cover’
    • Consider whether something is “all show, no go”
    • Look beyond glossy presentation (and don’t discount something just because it looks tatty)
  • 5. Relevance
    • Relevance is an important aspect of information quality
    • It might not relate to the quality of the information but rather whether it’s what you need
    • You might consider
      • Level – is it too detailed/specialised or too general/simple for what you need?
      • Emphasis – it may not contain the kind of information you are seeking
      • Geographic – it may relate to countries or areas you are not interested in at this time.
  • 6. Objectivity
    • Is the evidence balanced?
    • Does it offer the pros and cons of a particular perspective?
    • Will you need to find some balancing information
  • 7. Method
    • How was the information gathered?
    • Is it clear how the information was gathered?
    • Is “I asked a bloke in the pub” a valid data collection technique?
  • 8. Provenance
    • Who produced it and why? Is it clear who produced it – if not why not?
    • Ask yourself “Why does the author want to tell me this?”
    • It would be wrong to dismiss something because of who wrote it but you should consider whether they have a vested interest in a particular viewpoint
    • This links with objectivity
  • 9. Timeliness
    • Is it current?
    • Does it represent the latest information?
    • Have things changed since it was produced?
  • 10. Useful resource
    • I’ve taken much of this from Safari ( http://www.open.ac.uk/safari/index.php )
    • Skills in accessing, finding and reviewing information
    • An OU resource
  • 11. Any questions?
  • 12. Exercise
    • We’re going to read the paper now!
  • 13. Consider
    • P – Presentation
    • R – Relevance
    • O – Objectivity
    • M – Method
    • P – Provenance
    • T – Timeliness
    • What is the medium?
    • Who is it aimed at?
    • How is it funded?

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