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Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
Secondary Industries
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Secondary Industries

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  • 1.
      Secondary Industries
  • 2.
      Systems
      Inputs
      Outputs
      Processes
  • 11.
      PC PRO Cork
      http://www.pcprodistribution.ie/
  • 12.
      PC PRO, Cork
      Inputs
    • All usual inputs
      Processes
      Outputs
  • 31.
      Bread factory
      Inputs
      Processes
      Outputs
  • 49.
      Heavy and Light
      Heavy Industries
      Light Industries
    • Light inputs
    • 55. Small inputs
    • 56. Light products
    • 57. Small products
    • 58. Small factories in industrial estates
    • 59. Eg PC PRO, Cork
  • 60.
      ReadyMix Naas
      See an animation of the concrete making process here .
  • 61.
      Industrial Estates
    • Offers shared services for factories (infrastructure)
    • Are divided into plots
  • 65.
      Where are they located?
    • Near major roads for transport
    • Near airports
    • On edge of urban areas for workers and to avoid traffic jams
  • 66.
      Factors affecting industrial location
  • 74.
      Resource materials
    • Being near raw materials/components means
      • Transport costs reduced
    • Else
      • Near airport/port for easy transport
    • Especially important for heavy industry
      E.g ReadyMix located near gravel pits (7km) PC PRO located near Cork airport and port
  • 75.
      Labour
    • Being near towns/cities provides employees with range of skills
    • Being near a University etc means workers will be highly skilled
      E.g Readymix is near Naas,Newbridge which provides plenty workers PC PRO is near Cork and has electronic graduates from UCC
  • 76.
      Transport facilities
    • Transport carries inputs, products and workers to factory
    • Good road and rail needed
    • Near airports and ports also
      E.g Readymix is near N7 to Dublin and Cork and M50 to Dublin PC PRO is near N28 to Cork airport and port
  • 77.
      Markets
    • Is important for factories to be near the market for its product.
    • 78. Especially for industries producing
      • heavy products - less transport costs
      • 79. Bulky products - less transport costs
      • 80. Perishable products – less chance food will go off
      • 81. Fragile products - less chance of breakage
      E.g Readymix is 30 mins from Dublin
      • PC PRO is 6km from Cork
  • 82.
      Services
    • Factories need onsite services e.g Electricity, Water, Telephone
    • 83. All available on an industrial estate
    • Many factories have links with other factories
      • E.g for printing - security
      • 84. Packaging - research
      • 85. Courier - catering
      • 86. Maintenance
      E.g PC PRO has links with other factories for printing, packaging and couriers Readymix has no need for links
  • 87.
      Capital
    • Factories need money
    • Loans and grants are given to factories if they are in a suitable location
      E.g Readymix is a multinational company and the parent company provides funds AIB bank gave loans to PC PRO because of its good loaction
  • 88.
      Gov’t and EU policies
    • Irish Gov’t encourages industry with low taxes on profits
    • 89. IDA and Enterprise Ireland encourage industry to locate in Ireland
    • 90. EU provides Structural Fund to improve services and attract industry
    • 91. Free access to EU market
      E.g Both Readymix and PC PRO pay low taxes on profits PC PRO imports inputs tax free from other EU countries
  • 92.
      Personal preferences
    • Factory owners might prefer to locate near their homes.
    • 93. Especially family businesses
    • 94. Community support is important
      • Pro’s – will bring jobs to area
      • 95. Con’s – Might pollute area
      E.g Readymix was welcomed because it brough jobs to Naas PC PRO began in near owners home but had to move as business got bigger
  • 96.
      Footloose industry
      A footloose industry is one that can be located in a variety of locations. It is not tied to one locational factor
    • In the past industry was tied to one locational factor
    • 97. E.g Steel industry was near coal mines – coal was too bulky to transport – coal used for power
    • 98. Industry had to be near towns/cities – workers had to walk to work
  • 99.
    • Today industry not tied to single factor.
    • 100. E.g Electricity provides power and available everywhere
    • 101. Workers can commute to work – good transport
    • Modern industry therefore can be footloose
    • 102. E.g PC PRO Computers, Cork
    • 103. Dell Computers, Limerick
    • 104. Cadbury’s, Dublin
  • 105.  
  • 106.  

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