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  • 1. Rhyming LessonBy: Alexandra Mendez-Zfass, Jessica Meador, Mary-Beth Neal, Lindsay Wicher, Maggie NoctorAnnotated Bibliography: Thomas, Jan. (2009). Rhyming Dust Bunnies. New York:Beach Lane Books.The rhyming dust bunnies rhyme all the time, but poor Bob just cannot figure outthe right words to say. The other three dust bunnies Ed, Ned and Ted just keep onrhyming until Bob’s wrong attempts at rhyming become warnings that a broom orvacuum cleaner are coming their way. The dust bunnies then realize that Bob hasnot been saying wrong rhymes but warnings the whole time.Name of Activity: The Rhyming CircleMaterials: The book: Rhyming Dust Bunnies One fuzzy ballDirections:1. Read the title, author, and illustrator of the story to the students.2. Read and enjoy the story.3. Ask students what they thought Bob was doing the entire time throughout thestory?4. Tell the students we are going to play a rhyming game and have them sit in acircle.5. Explain to students the rules of game, the teacher will be “Bob” and will pick theword students are to rhyme with when they are holding the fuzzy ball or dustbunny.6. Toss the ball to a student and say the word, student says rhyming word and thentosses ball to another student.7. If a student gets stuck, or runs out of rhyming words they toss ball back to “Bob”who picks a new word to rhyme with.
  • 2. Rhyming Lesson By: Maggie NoctorAnnotated Bibliography: Thomas, Jan. (2009). Here Comes the Big, Mean DustBunny! New York: Beach Lane Books.The rhyming dust bunnies are rhyming again, only this time they have trouble. A big,mean dust bunny starts playing the rhyming game with Ed, Ned and Ted. Hisrhymes end in trouble for the four dust bunnies, while Bob again seems to be havingtrouble with rhyming. Bob’s wrong rhymes become warnings again when a catcomes and “splats” the big, mean dust bunny. When all four dust bunnies save him,they all become friends.Name of Activity: Splat downMaterials: The book: Here Comes the Big, Mean Dust Bunny!Directions:1. Read the title, author, and illustrator of the story to the students.2. Read and enjoy the story.3. Tell students we will be playing a rhyming game.4. Have students walk around in a large circle, students may only take a step whenthe teacher says a rhyming word.5. When the teacher says a word that does not rhyme all the students should sitdown where they stand.6. The first two times use strings of rhyming words used in the book; thug, tug, hug,or drat, cat, flat, splat.7. Then continue using other strings of rhyming words the students may notice orthat are sight words.
  • 3. Segmenting Lesson By: Maggie NoctorAnnotated Bibliography: Dunbar, Joyce. (1998). Baby Bird. Massachusetts:Candlewick Press. Baby Bird falls out of the nest and is wandering around on the ground. BabyBird meets lots of new animals like frog and bee. But must learn how to fly quicklyto avoid danger from other animals like cat and dog. Finally Baby Bird finds a wayback to the nest.Name of Activity: Bingo SegmentingMaterials: The book: Baby Bird Egg cartons cut in half (works best with clear so students can seecolored chips) Multi-color plastic bingo chipsDirections:1. Read the title, author, and illustrator of the story to the students.2. Read and enjoy the story.3. Have students sit with a cut in half egg carton with six magnetic chips, one in eachhole of the egg carton.4. Give students a word from the story with 1-6 phonemes in the word.5. Have students pick up a chip while saying each sound of the word.6. Make sure students are working left to right.7. Repeat with more words from the story; Nest, bird, flop, frog, cat, dog, flap, bee
  • 4. Segmenting Lesson By: Maggie NoctorAnnotated Bibliography:Name of Activity: Lighting WordsMaterials: The book: Four touch night lights per studentDirections:1. Read the title, author, and illustrator of the story to the students.2. Read and enjoy the story.3. Work in small groups with students4. Line up the night lights in a row; give the student a word from the story that is 1-4phonemes long.5. Have students say the sounds in the word as they turn on one light for each soundworking left to right.6. Repeat this process with the same word, but have students turn the lights off thistime.7. Repeat with more words from the story;
  • 5. Segmenting Lesson By: Maggie NoctorAnnotated Bibliography:Name of Activity: Tossing WordsMaterials: The book: One basket Five bean bags 1 piece of paper with 3 columns for each studentDirections:1. Read the title, author, and illustrator of the story to the students.2. Read and enjoy the story.3. Work in small groups with students, have a blank piece of paper with threecolumns.4. Write words from the story with 1-5 phonemes on the left-hand side column onpaper.5. Give students 1-5 bean bags depending on the number of sounds they heard ineach word.6. Students throw a bean bag into a basket in front of them for each sound they hearin the words. A point is received for each bean bag that makes it into the basket.7. When finished throwing, have students count up their points and write the totalin the far right column.7. Repeat with more words from the story;
  • 6. Segmenting Lesson By: Maggie NoctorAnnotated Bibliography: Kelly, Mij. (2006). One More Sheep. Georgia; PeachtreePublishers. Sam the farmer has ten sheep and on cold, rainy nights he brings them in tokeep them save from the wolf. However, Sam cannot stay awake long enough tocount all ten sheep since counting sheep puts him to sleep. The wolf dresses up onenight to trick Sam, luckily the sheep see right through the disguise. The sheep finallyget Sam to count all ten of them and save the house from the wolf.Name of Activity: Jumping PhonemesMaterials: The book: One More SheepDirections:1. Read the title, author, and illustrator of the story to the students.2. Read and enjoy the story.3. Have students stand in circle.4. Give students a word from the story with 1-3 phonemes in the word.5. Have students clap hands on each phoneme they hear, while one student hopsinto the circle with each sound.6. Make sure students are saying each phoneme as they clap and jump.7. Repeat with more words from the story; bed, ten, sheep, boss, nod, one, three,two, sixLittle adventurers will step gingerly across this rushing river--if, that is, they recognize the lettersof the alphabet. Divide your children into two groups. Have the groups sit in parallel lines, facingeach other Explain that between the two lines is a deep and swirling river. Randomly place agenerous supply of alphabet cards, or "stepping-stones", in this space between the groups.Designate one group to be the "callers" and one to be the "steppers." To play the game, a childon one side of the river calls out stepping-stone letters as the child opposite him steps from letterttoletter. If a child steps onto a letter other than the one called, he "falls into the river" and mustbegin again from his original position. When everyone has safely crossed the river, the steppersreturn to their original places and become the callers so the callers can become the steppers.Make an alphabet die for this game of luck. Cut two half-gallon milk cartons in half. Push onecarton bottom inside the other to form a large cube. Cover the cube with contact paper "before"labeling each of its sides with a different letter of the alphabet. To use the cube, youngsters taketurns rolling the die and naming the letter.Looking for a really unusual approach to letter review? Try this suggestion as a before or afternap transition. With your room completely darkened, use a flashlight to "write" a letter on the
  • 7. ceiling for your youngsters, to identify. Then give each youngster a turn to do the same. Letterreview is really looking up!Take a giant step toward letter identification with this gross motor alternative. Each time a newletter is introduced, use colorful masking tape or plastic tape to create a giant version of that letteron your playroom floor or kitchen floor. Then instruct youngsters to "walk, hop, crawl, or otherwisemove" along the lines of the letter. While its a few small steps for each child, its one giant leapfor letter recognition.

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