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Working Wikily presentation at The Hub

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  • 1. Monitor Institute Working Wikily: O Social Change with a Network Mindset  ‫‏‬ Fall, 2009 Monitor Institute A member of the Monitor Group January 19th, 2009 BEIJING CAMBRIDGE CHICAGO DELHI DUBAI HONG KONG JOHANNESBURG LONDON LOS ANGELES MADRID MOSCOW MUMBAI MUNICH NEW YORK PARIS SAN FRANCISCO SÃO PAULO SEOUL SHANGHAI SINGAPORE TOKYO TORONTO ZURICH
  • 2. Who we are Monitor Institute  part consulting firm, part incubator part think tank, drawing on the talents of our own of new approaches. We work with analyzing and anticipating important dedicated team and the resources of clients and partners to test and prove shifts in the rapidly changing context the global professional services firm, new models for social impact. that leaders must navigate. Monitor Group. Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 2
  • 3. What I do Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 3
  • 4. Tonight’s conversation: three parts   Social media is changing the social sector.   The deeper opportunity it creates is to work in networks—to “work wikily.”   Peer consult: how do you want to work more wikily? Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 4
  • 5. First, get up and ask yourself…  How comfortable are you with  social media tools?  Stand accordingly…  Competing with Ashton Kutcher for Twitter followers?   NOT AT ALL VERY    Somewhere in between?   Just got a Facebook account this week?  
  • 6. There’s a lot of new tools to use out there. Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 6
  • 7. We’ve seen a lot of social-media milestones this past year. Jan. 20th: Obama takes March 28th: Earth June 13th: Iran’s Today: $22 million in SMS office as the first Hour 2009 uses Green Revolution donations have arrived at the president to have social media and protestors make Red Cross for relief work in campaigned through mobilizes ten times heavy use of social Haiti, with a peak rate of $500K/ social media. CNN the number of media for organizing hour during the NFL playoffs. partners with Facebook people as in 2008. and promoting the to broadcast online cause. users’ live commentary. October 18th: The UN End Poverty Now campaign uses social media to mobilize 173 million participants worldwide. April 17th: Ashton Kutcher beats October 9th: The November 1st: Kiva CNN.com in a race to become the first “Sweet Seeds for reaches $100 million to gain 1 million Twitter followers. Haiti” initiative in in micro-loans Facebook’s popular distributed through its Farmville game online giving May 25th: Target gives Facebook raises over half a marketplace. users the choice of how to give away million in donations. $3 million in company donations among 10 charities. As presented in “Social Media Blueprints 1.0” by ThinkSocial at the Paley Center for Media. Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 7
  • 8. This is just the tip of the iceberg.   Take Iive minutes to talk with your neighbor:  How have you seen social media  altering the world in the last  few years? 
  • 9. The social sector is racing ahead to use these new tools. According to a longitudinal study that included the 200 largest American charities, nonprofits are outpacing both business and academia in using social media to fundraise, market, and organize. A few key sta+s+cs:
 “If you think about it,  89% of
the
respondents
use
social
media
 often working on  shoestring budgets and  heartstring issues, the  81% consider
social
media
in
their
strategy
 combination of  nonproBits and social  media makes perfect  79% use
social
networking
and
video
blogging
 sense. Two of the biggest  beneBits of social media:  efBiciency and  57% publish
a
blog
 connectivity.”  45% say
social
media
is
important
for
fundraising
 Blake Bowyer, EyeTraf7ic Media  Source: “Still Setting the Pace in Social Media” by Nora Barnes and Eric Mattson at the U. Mass Dartmouth Center for Marketing Research. Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 9
  • 10. We’ve been documenting the innovative results. Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 10
  • 11. The tools’ immediate use is gradually becoming clear. There are now frameworks available from social media experts on how today’s tools can be  used in a disciplined way, such as the one below from Beth Kanter:  Beth Kanter publishes her ongoing thoughts about social media in the social sector at h?p://beth.typepad.com/.   Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 11
  • 12. Advocacy work is being powerfully affected. Many member‐supported advocacy organizaEons are feeling the effects of social media on the  way they engage consEtuents, according to research that we are currently conducEng.   Advocacy and engagement are changing: Fundraising and business models are changing: •  Social media is a major new tool •  The donation-based “membership for mobilization model” may be in decline •  Donors and activists are now •  Direct marketing appears to be in mingling decline •  Integration across multiple •  Email remains the most effective channels is a new challenge online fundraising channel •  Connecting online and offline •  Integration is a new challenge in activism is increasingly important fundraising Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 12
  • 13. Take ten minutes to talk with your table:  How have you seen nonproIits  using social media?  Talk about what you’ve seen nonpro7its doing and how it appears to  have served their mission.   Write down the table’s list and pick a favorite example to share.   
  • 14. But there’s an even deeper change: the rise of networks. The current change in one sentence is  this: most of the barriers to group  action have collapsed, and without  those barriers, we are free to explore  new ways of gathering together and  getting things done.  Clay Shirky, “Here Comes Everybody” (2008)  Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 14
  • 15. But there’s an even deeper change: the rise of networks. Hierarchies
connect
us
in
formal
 Networks
connect
us
as
peers
on
 superior/inferior
rela:onships,
o<en
 voluntary
terms
and
require
a
shared
 on
contractual
terms,
to
focus
on
a
 sense
of
purpose.

 single
agenda.
 Today’s tools allow us to recognize, use, and create networks with ease. As a result we now have more opportunities than ever to use networks for practical goals. Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 15
  • 16. Grab a piece of paper and a pen.  What is one network that is  important to doing your work?   “Hub”  “Link”  “Node”  Draw a dot for yourself in the middle, a dot for everyone else in the  network, and lines for each meaningful connection between them.   For example: the 20‐odd people I rely on in my 100‐person of7ice for  everything from teamwork to career advice.  
  • 17. Working in networks lets us work differently—“wikily.” There’s a different set of organizaEonal structures,  values, and pracEces that today’s tools make  feasible. We call it “working wikily.”  •  Openness
 •  Transparency
 •  Decentraliza:on
 •  Distributed
ac:on
 •  Collabora:on
 •  Listening
 “Working Wikily”  •  Independence
 •  Mutual
alignment
 •  Diversity
 •  Sharing  Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 17
  • 18. Working wikily can be done in many contexts. OrganizaEons can run from centralized to decentralized and sEll do their work wikily:  Centralized   Nonprofit organizations (without a network structure)   Membership organizations   Nonprofits with an explicit network structure   Coalitions and alliances   Networks of networks   Ad hoc networks Decentralized Developed from Plastrik and Taylor’s “Net Gains” (2006); Patti Anklam’s “Net Work” (2007); and, Krebs and Holley’s “Building Smart Communities” (2006). Images courtesy of orgnet.com. Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 18
  • 19. And it can be put to many uses. When
the
problem
is…
 Working wikily can be used to…    Social
isola:on
   Build community    Collec:ve
problems
   Engage volunteers    Lack
of
power
   Advocate for policy change    Fragmented
efforts
   Coordinate resources and services    Stovepiped
knowledge
   Make knowledge accessible    Capaci:es
exist
elsewhere
   Access capacity on‐demand    Not
enough
capital
to
grow
   Get to scale  Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 19
  • 20. …for building community… 2008: 1980: 162 Countries 205 Members 400,000 Ministers / Priests Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 20
  • 21. …for engaging volunteers… 1985: 2008: 400,000 Volunteers in Single-site U.S. 104 Countries effort Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 21
  • 22. …in advocating policy change… 1998: Email to 2009: 5+ Million 100 friends Members Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 22
  • 23. …for coordinating resources & services… Total Loans Total Loans 2006: $1 million 2009: $100 million Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 23
  • 24. …for making knowledge accessible… 14 Countries 1,300 Trained Volunteers Interagency Program Integrated Fire Management Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 24
  • 25. …for accessing capacity on demand… Internal, “Open Sourcing Proprietary Social R&D Labs Solutions” Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 25
  • 26. …for getting to scale… ‐ EGYPT‐   Typical HFH country HFH Egypt: 1,000 houses programs: 200 houses a year on average each year Source: Jane Wei-Skillern and Kerry Herman, “Habitat for Humanity—Egypt,” Harvard Business School Cases, October 3, 2006. Copyright © 2009 Monitor Company Group, L.P.. 26
  • 27. Who wants free crowdsourced consulting?  Raise your hand if you want help  thinking about how to do your work  more wikily.  We’ll take as many ‘clients’ as we have tables.  Listen to the questions. Think about which you could help the most.  Get up and join your favorite or wherever there’s space.  
  • 28. Let’s help these people out.   1.  10 minutes: the ‘client’ describes their need, interrupted  only by clarifying questions.   2.  10 minutes: the table offers ideas while the ‘client’ stays  silent.  3.  Share your conclusions with the group.   It doesn’t matter if you’re not an expert.   Listen carefully and think of options to suggest.  
  • 29. Q&A
  • 30. Thank you. Noah Flower   Monitor
Ins:tute
 noah_flower@monitor.com


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