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Palawan Corridor Conservation Strategy and Current Initiatives
 

Palawan Corridor Conservation Strategy and Current Initiatives

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Palawan Corridor

Palawan Corridor
Conservation Strategy and
Current Initiatives
Corridor Workshop

Cebu, Philippines
January 9-13, 2008

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    Palawan Corridor Conservation Strategy and Current Initiatives Palawan Corridor Conservation Strategy and Current Initiatives Presentation Transcript

    • Palawan CorridorConservation Strategy andCurrent InitiativesCorridor WorkshopCebu, PhilippinesJanuary 9-13, 2008
    • CI-P’s Priority Corridors
    • Palawan Corridor Strategy Biological assessment Socio-economic assessment Threats analysis Policy assessment
    • Palawan Corridor Planning: Biological Assessment18 species of FRESHWATER FISH (50% endemic to thecorridor)26 species of AMPHIBIANS (25% endemic to the country,majority are confined to the corridor)69 species of REPTILES (29% are endemic to the country)279 species of BIRDS (10% are endemic to the country); 34%of bird species are migratory, making the region a vital flywayfor migratory birds58 species of TERRESTRIAL MAMMALS, 19 or 33% areendemic to the country, 16 are restricted to the corridor Source: CI, 2004; CI/BASMU, 2007
    • Palawan Corridor Planning: Biological Assessment Trigger Species AAA KBA Name CR EN VU RR BBBEl Nido – Taytay Managed Resource Protected Area 1 2 11 16 1Malampaya Sound Protected Landscape and 2 2 10 18Seascape 2 CCCLake Manguao 1 1 13 20 1San Vicente-Taytay-Roxas Forest 2 1 11 10 2 3Puerto Princesa Subterranean River National Park 2 2 12 19Cleopatra Needle s 1 1 3 1Victoria and Anepahan Ranges 1 4 15 22Mt Mantalingahan 2 3 13 20
    • Palawan Corridor Planning: Biological Assessment Trigger Species KBA Name CR EN VU RRCalauit Island 1 2 10 22Busuanga Island 1 1 9 37Culion Island 1 1 8 33Coron Island 1 0 6 4Dumaran-Araceli 2 2 5 5Rasa Island Wildlife Sanctuary 1 2 3 0Ursula Island 0 0 3 0Balabac Island 1 2 10 39Tubbataha Reef Natural Park 1 1 1 0
    • Palawan Corridor Planning: Demographic AssessmentPopulation Growth Rate Fig. 1. In-migration trends, Palawan Corridor Pre-1945 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s Local fishing Subsistence farming NTFP harvesting Local trading Copra and mangrove harvesting Commercial mining Commercial fishing, logging, trading Land release program : NARRA CARP Social unrest Source: CI/Boquiren, 2004
    • Palawan Corridor Planning: Economic/Threats Assessment Major Biodiversity Threats Forest Destruction Logging Agriculture (slash and burn) Fuelwood gathering Depletion of marine fishery Mangrove destruction Legal and illegal fishing Mining and quarrying Roads and other large infrastructure development Tourism development Wildlife hunting
    • Palawan Corridor Planning: Economic/Threats Assessment Land Use Changes in a Nickel Mining Area
    • Palawan Corridor Planning: Economic/Threats Assessment Risk of Forest Habitat Loss Analysis Integrates economic theory with Geographic Information Sciences (GIS). Involved interpreting and $ ! %% ! " & $$ ( merging data and analysis across spatial and hierarchical # scales. "" ! # Spatial econometrics was used )* *+ to tease out the relationships ! " ! , ! between geophysical features of ! the land with broader socio- # ," economic and demographic trends.Source: CI/GWong & Castrence, 2004
    • Palawan Corridor Planning: Economic/Threats Assessment Risk of Forest Habitat Loss Analysis Why do a habitat loss analysis? • A business-as-usual habitat loss analysis is generated to predict future landscape change based on current trends and policies. $ %% & $$ ( • To communicate the risks of the status ! ! " quo. • To identify the relative vulnerability of # "" different habitats to degradation and human ! # activity. , )* *+ • To contribute towards the design of a ! spatially explicit conservation plan that ! ! " ! minimizes habitat loss risks and opportunity # ," costs.Source: CI/GWong & Castrence, 2004
    • Palawan Corridor Planning: Economic/Threats Assessment Variables used in the risk of habitat loss analysis Risk of Forest Habitat Loss Analysis Class Variables Scale Land cover (=0 if primary; =1 for all other) Pixel Slope (in degrees) Geophysical Elevation (in meters) Pixel $ %% & $$ ( features Land use and land cover diversity ! ! " NDVI change from 1987 to 1998 Demographic Population density Brgy Population growth (1995 – 2000) # Projected pop’n growth (2000 – 2005 ) "" ! # Access costs Distance to nearest road Pixel Distance to nearest town )* *+ , Socio- Per capita income (in PhP) Municip ! ! ! " economic Human Development Index (HDI) al ! Policy Presence of tenurial rights (Tenure = Pixel # ," 1 if clear tenure exists, such as CADCs and CBFMAs; = 0 otherwise)Source: CI/GWong & Castrence, 2004
    • Palawan Corridor Planning: Economic/Threats Assessment Risk of Forest Habitat Loss Analysis Potential impacts on biodiversity! $ %% & $$ ( ! ! " # "" ! # )* *+ , ! ! ! " ! # ,"Source: CI/Gwong & Castrence, 2004
    • Palawan Corridor Planning: Economic/Threats Assessment Risk of Forest Habitat Loss Analysis Risk of Habitat Loss, by Forest Type (% ) 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% High risk 50% Medium risk 40% Low risk 30% $ %% & $$ ( ! ! " 20% 10% 0% Prim ary Secondary # Forests under high risks, by municipality "" ! # 14000 12000 )* *+ 10000 Secondary , 8000 Primary ! ! Ha ! " 6000 4000 ! # ," 2000 0 Bataraza Brookes Española Quezon Rizal PointSource: CI/Gwong & Castrence, 2004
    • Palawan Corridor Strategy Awareness campaign Biodiversity research & monitoring Watershed/protected area management Law enforcement Linking human well- being & biodiversity conservation
    • Priority Site:Mt. MantalingahanProtected Landscape. . . a new protected area (2004 to present). . . 126,000 hectares
    • Site Outcome:Mt. Mantalingahan Protected Landscape One of the 10 sites of the Alliance for Zero Extinction (AZE) in the Philippines; One of the 11 important bird areas in Palawan; One of the 17 terrestrial key biodiversity areas (KBA) in Palawan; The largely forested mountain range covers several critical watersheds that are extremely valuable to lowland agricultural economy. The large expanse of forest also plays a macro-climatic function by acting as a significant carbon sink.
    • Site Outcome:Mt. Mantalingahan Protected Landscape Location: South of Palawan Province, Philippines 5 Municipalities covered: Bataraza, Brooks Point, Quezon, Rizal, Sofronio Espanola Population: at least 3,000 HH of indigenous Palaw’an Key Species: Palawan soft-furred mountain rat (Palawanomys furvus), Philippine cockatoo (Cacatua haematuropygia), Palawan striped-babbler (Stachyris hypogrammica)
    • Site Outcome:Mt. Mantalingahan Protected Landscape Legal Requirements 1 Compilation of maps & technical descriptions 2 Initial screening 3 Public notifications 4 Initial consultation 5 Census & registration of PA occupants 6 Resource profiling 7 Initial Protected Area Plan 8 Public hearings 9 Regional review & recommendations 10 National review & recommendations 11 Presidential Proclamation 12 Congressional action 13 Demarcation
    • Site Outcome:Mt. Mantalingahan Protected Landscape RESOURCE Summary of the economic values of Mt. Mantalingahan Range VALUATION (present value, i=10%) Use Value (Php) Valuation(Focus on Use Values) Approach• Direct use values Timber 24,357,190,909 Opportunity cost Timber NTFPs Use of land for Carbon Sequestration 12,059,604,347 Benefits transfer agroforestry Water Soil Conservation 1 43,068,093 Replacement cost• Indirect use values Water and Biodiversity 64,156,435 Contingent valuation Carbon sequestration Soil conservation Direct use of IPs* Biodiversity TOTAL 36,624,019,784 *to be estimated
    • Site Outcome:Mt. Mantalingahan Protected Landscape LAND-USE ANALYSIS Method Assess optimality of existing and planned land-uses Suitability assessment of existing and proposed land-uses Estimate minimum requirements to conserve water, soil and biodiversity o Suitability – compatibility to site quality (i.e., slope) Recommend strategies to achieve o Suitability – onsite and offsite right mix of development and impacts (streamflows and soil conservation uses erosion) Facilitate update of municipal land o Suitability – consistency with use plans legal framework (i.e., legal classification of the land) Provide inputs to the protected area management plan o Suitability – in terms of financial viability
    • Site Outcome:Mt. Mantalingahan Protected Landscape LAND-USE ANALYSIS Levels and Scales of Assessment Landscape Watershed • micro watersheds (<1000 ha) • 21 small watersheds (1000 to 10K ha) • 10 medium watersheds (10K to 50K ha)
    • Site Outcome:Mt. Mantalingahan Protected Landscape TOTAL EROSION (tons/ha) inside the Mt. Mantalingahan Range Total Area of Current Land Use ECAN 250-Recession 500-m Recession 750-m Recession Watershed Watershed Erosion Erosion Erosion Erosion Erosion (ha) Total USLE Total USLE Total USLE Total USLE Total USLE ton/ha ton/ha ton/ha ton/ha ton/ha Aplian-Caramay River 6896.40 12919.6 1.9 13026.1 1.9 13087.8 1.9 13087.8 1.9 13037.7 1.9 Babanga River 1564.42 11582.5 7.4 11583.1 7.4 11583.2 7.4 11583.2 7.4 11583.3 7.4 Barong-barong River 6079.11 6171.4 1.0 3115.6 0.5 6172.5 1.0 6172.5 1.0 6172.5 1.0 Bono-bono River 1326.23 7422.5 5.6 4395.1 3.3 3687.5 2.8 4228.0 3.2 7422.5 5.6 Bulalacao River 2510.68 10135.4 4.0 8691.8 3.5 10135.4 4.0 10135.4 4.0 10135.4 4.0 Buligay River 4800.61 17955.6 3.7 16140.6 3.4 17956.4 3.7 17956.4 3.7 17956.4 3.7 Candawaga River 7914.09 53135.8 6.7 51811.3 6.5 53134.8 6.7 53134.8 6.7 53171.8 6.7 Culasian River 10791.75 53576.9 5.0 53561.8 5.0 53579.2 5.0 53579.2 5.0 53578.7 5.0 Idyok River 951.10 1136.9 1.2 1138.8 1.2 1139.2 1.2 1139.2 1.2 1138.8 1.2 Ilog River 10809.76 34503.9 3.2 34675.4 3.2 34677.2 3.2 34677.2 3.2 34737.1 3.2 Inogbong River 3347.05 14064.4 4.2 9506.2 2.8 10759.7 3.2 14363.9 4.3 14126.0 4.2 Iraan River 18356.83 46615.8 2.5 45774.7 2.5 46615.4 2.5 46618.5 2.5 46625.5 2.5 Iwahig River 17834.89 133357.6 7.5 126537.1 7.1 91342.9 5.1 94036.8 5.3 133376.3 7.5 Kinlugan River 6999.88 33106.8 4.7 33218.4 4.7 33269.8 4.8 33275.5 4.8 33236.0 4.7 Labog River 5365.92 44376.4 8.3 44611.2 8.3 44611.2 8.3 44611.2 8.3 44654.8 8.3 Lamikan River 15778.33 53632.6 3.4 53282.2 3.4 53600.6 3.4 53600.6 3.4 53632.6 3.4 Malambunga River 14512.93 58024.0 4.0 57879.7 4.0 57879.8 4.0 57879.8 4.0 58024.0 4.0 Mambalot-Pilantropia River 12363.42 16175.6 1.3 9757.1 0.8 16192.4 1.3 16192.4 1.3 16192.5 1.3 Marangas River 4840.48 24817.2 5.1 2302.8 0.5 24426.4 5.0 24818.2 5.1 24818.5 5.1 Panalingaan River 7107.03 53114.2 7.5 53119.4 7.5 53124.7 7.5 53124.7 7.5 53128.7 7.5 Panitian River QZ 17903.02 92247.9 5.2 92229.2 5.2 92230.1 5.2 92230.1 5.2 92267.7 5.2 Pulot River 18192.31 43720.9 2.4 43836.3 2.4 43848.4 2.4 43848.4 2.4 43843.2 2.4 Ransang River 8915.92 59431.7 6.7 59720.4 6.7 59720.5 6.7 59720.5 6.7 59752.5 6.7 Salogon River 2492.34 21979.0 8.8 16769.8 6.7 21979.7 8.8 21979.7 8.8 21979.7 8.8 Samare±ana River 7065.58 36449.8 5.2 28658.9 4.1 36472.2 5.2 36472.2 5.2 36472.8 5.2 Saraza River 3836.27 19646.2 5.1 16380.8 4.3 19647.7 5.1 19647.7 5.1 19647.7 5.1 Summerumsum River 3193.47 28998.6 9.1 28997.7 9.1 28999.1 9.1 28999.1 9.1 28999.3 9.1 Tagbuaya River 7251.98 38889.2 5.4 38849.9 5.4 38949.0 5.4 38949.0 5.4 38905.4 5.4 Tagusao River 5658.74 31632.2 5.6 31595.2 5.6 31595.6 5.6 31595.6 5.6 31632.4 5.6 Tarusan River 2811.51 16283.0 5.8 16120.3 5.7 16285.0 5.8 16285.0 5.8 16283.3 5.8 Tasay River 2668.48 9315.8 3.5 7387.0 2.8 9314.4 3.5 9314.4 3.5 9315.8 3.5 Tigaplan River 17248.77 51405.7 3.0 31027.6 1.8 51408.0 3.0 51408.0 3.0 51408.0 3.0 Unnamed River 113.39 1459.3 12.9 890.2 7.9 1495.4 13.2 1460.9 12.9 3990.1 35.2 242962.77 1137284.5 1046591.6 1088921.2 1096126.1 1141246.9
    • Site Outcome:Mt. Mantalingahan Protected Landscape Total Area Total of Streamflow Watershed Erosion Watershed (MCM) (ha) (ton) Initial Results Aplian-Caramay River 6896.40 Babanga River 1564.42 Barong-barong River 6079.11 Bono-bono River 1326.23 Bulalacao River Buligay River 2510.68 4800.61 Land Use Change 1998-2006 Candawaga River 7914.09 Culasian River Idyok River 10791.75 951.10 Old growth forests being lost to Ilog River Inogbong River 10809.76 3347.05 open canopy and cultivation Iraan River 18356.83 Iwahig River 17834.89 Kinlugan River Labog River 6999.88 5365.92 Residual forest being lost to Lamikan River Malambunga River 15778.33 14512.93 cultivation Mambalot-Pilantropia River 12363.42 Marangas River Panalingaan River 4840.48 7107.03 30% of brushland converted to Panitian River QZ 17903.02 Pulot River 18192.31 cultivation Ransang River 8915.92 Salogon River 2492.34 Mangrove being lost to fishpond Samare±ana River 7065.58 Saraza River 3836.27 Summerumsum River 3193.47 Tagbuaya River 7251.98 development Tagusao River 5658.74 Tarusan River 2811.51 Tasay River 2668.48 Tigaplan River 17248.77 Unnamed River 113.39 TOTAL 257502.69
    • Site Outcome:Mt. Mantalingahan Protected Landscape
    • Site Outcome:Mt. Mantalingahan Protected LandscapeOther Ongoing Activities• Capacity strengthening of PA management body• Management plan formulation o Design of sustainable financing scheme o Design of tools for PA monitoring and adaptive management• Management plan implementation• Other relevant further technical assistance
    • Site Outcome:Mt. Mantalingahan Protected Landscape Sites with formal recognition as + Mt. Mantalingahan . . . protected area 18% 30%
    • maraming salamat poMore positive outcomes in 2008 and beyond!