Sports Tips from the Pros
Tips to capture the magic
MYTH: Great shots are only made from
credentialed positions
Some of the best pictures are actually made from the
stands, o...
Look at the type of
pictures that are
being published in
your local
newspapers, national
magazines and web
sites. If you w...
Homework:
If you’re just shooting to become a
better sports photographer, know
what kind of pictures work.
We stand on the...
ANTICIPATION
If you think you know what’s going to happen next,
the better your chances of getting the picture.
If it’s th...
Action or reaction?
There is nothing better than a
great peak moment captured in
sports. But sometimes, the
better image m...
Tight or loose?
Don’t be afraid to use long glass. You’ll miss more
pictures but the one you nail will be a belter.
And it...
BACKGROUNDS!
The cleaner your background, the better your image
will be. At a rodeo? There is nothing worse than
those awf...
Angles! Be different!
We experience life at eye level. So if you shoot at
eye level, you bring nothing new to the table.
L...
Shoot heavy
You’ll need bursts during peak action.
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Sports photojournalism

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  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MZwZWt1ngh0http://vimeo.com/70157358http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vrO4Wf6Ude0&list=PLxblDNSyTV_qUI1X-iF1XQKdJGQWk76lQ&index=6http://on.ted.com/Saundershttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V7BGu-kDWBchttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFFkrNCciZAhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BN1cyECxVg8http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uSoWjC2bW2Y&feature=c4-overview-vl&list=PLnuf8iyXggLEvh3xEzsDuvqG9OHIOJnRVhttp://petapixel.com/2013/10/23/football-photogs-sue-nfl-getty-ap-complex-rights-case/http://www.gannonburgett.com/post/51091431726/sports-photojournalismhttp://insidesportsillustrated.com/2013/05/09/sports-illustrated-director-of-photography-brad-smith-discusses-this-weeks-leading-off/https://twitter.com/SInow/status/324195720095735808/photo/1
  • Sports photojournalism

    1. 1. Sports Tips from the Pros Tips to capture the magic
    2. 2. MYTH: Great shots are only made from credentialed positions Some of the best pictures are actually made from the stands, or elevated positions. This is true for almost all sports, but especially outside the professional spectrum. More and more leagues are trying to control access and content so you will have better luck getting clearance on a collegiate, high school or even youth level. There are many local sporting events that do not require a credential. Start there.
    3. 3. Look at the type of pictures that are being published in your local newspapers, national magazines and web sites. If you want to shoot for Sports Illustrated you better know what they run
    4. 4. Homework: If you’re just shooting to become a better sports photographer, know what kind of pictures work. We stand on the shoulders of those that came before us. Research the greats; Walter Iooss Jr., Neil Leifer, Heinz Kluetmeier, Hy Peskin and others. Buy or browse their books….search the web, study their images. And understanding your subject matter is critical as well. You better know the rules of a football game before you try shooting one. Which brings us to…
    5. 5. ANTICIPATION If you think you know what’s going to happen next, the better your chances of getting the picture. If it’s third and long at a football game, there’s a great probability that there’s going to be a long pass to try to get that first down. Focus your attention on the wide receivers downfield or at the very least, the quarterback…who may get sacked. Man at first with less than two outs in baseball? Could be a double play ball…good time to focus on second base for the slide and throw. Know your sport. Anticipate the next play…and be ready.
    6. 6. Action or reaction? There is nothing better than a great peak moment captured in sports. But sometimes, the better image may be behind you…or after the play. The react photo will have the emotion that an action photo will not. Be ready for the athlete screaming or punching the air after they crossed the finish line at a track event. Emotion is the great equalizer in sports photography.
    7. 7. Tight or loose? Don’t be afraid to use long glass. You’ll miss more pictures but the one you nail will be a belter. And it’s better to have it “in-camera,” than to crop into it later. Tight action brings you closer to your subject and makes the play more impactful….and less depth of field will diffuse the background for more “pop.” Incorporate your surroundings…look for the scene setter…think wide as well as tight. In most sports, you will have “crunch,” and “grace.” Think tight for crunch. Think loose for grace.
    8. 8. BACKGROUNDS! The cleaner your background, the better your image will be. At a rodeo? There is nothing worse than those awful metal bars and people in the stands getting in the way of your subject in the foreground. If you go up in the stands, and get an elevated position, your background will be dirt…and your foreground will pop….without any clutter. Have the viewer’s eye go right to what you want featured and not wander into the background.
    9. 9. Angles! Be different! We experience life at eye level. So if you shoot at eye level, you bring nothing new to the table. Look for dynamic angles. Shooting low gives your subject a “heroic,” look. Shooting high may give you a better sense of place or that nice clean background. And always look to shoot from somewhere where no other photographer is present. This way you will always guarantee yourself an exclusive!
    10. 10. Shoot heavy You’ll need bursts during peak action.
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