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Off job safety english
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  • 1. Off-Job Safety Bo o k l e t Loss Prevention Department © Copyright 2008, Saudi Aramco. All rights reserved.
  • 2. Off-Job Safety Booklet Contents1. Home Safety Checklist 12. Slips, Trips, and Falls at Home 73. Fire Safety 114. Electrical Safety 145. Accidental Poisoning 166. Food Safety 197. Choking 218. Drowning 239. Playground Safety 2510. Toy Safety 3011. Sports Safety 3212. Sun Protection 3413. Water Safety 4114. Traffic Safety 4515. First Aid Basics 51
  • 3. Home Safety ChecklistC omplete the following checklist at minimum twice a year to help you identify the hazards in your home. Read eachquestion carefully and then mark your answers. You shouldanswer YES to aII 10 questions for each room. If you can’t yourhome contains some unnecessary hazards. Start correcting themimmediately.Living room, family room, and bedroom 1. Are heavy traffic areas well-lit and are there night-lights in the bedrooms of children and seniors? yes no 2. Are traffic areas and exits free of furniture, obstructions, and other tripping hazards? yes no 3. Is a lamp within easy reach of each bed? yes no 4. Do area rugs have nonskid backings? yes no 5. Have you removed all area rugs at the top of stairs? yes no 6. Are electrical wall outlets for lamps and appliances plentiful? yes no 7. Do you use large, deep ashtrays and never smoke in bed or when you are drowsy? yes no 8. Are furnishings, drapes and other combustible materials positioned safely away from open flames and other heat sources? yes no 9. Are smoke detectors or similar devices in place to alert occupants in case of fire and do you have a family fire escape plan? yes no1
  • 4. Off-Job Safety Booklet 10. Are all glass doors taped or otherwise made obvious? yes noStairways 1. Are stairs well-lit at the top and bottom? yes no 2. Are handrails for outside steps and inside stairways sturdy? yes no 3. Are there sturdy banisters on open stairs, stairwells and balconies? yes no 4. Do you avoid using stairways as temporary storage areas? yes no 5. Are children’s toys kept off the stairs? yes no 6. Are children prohibited from using the stairway as a play area? yes no 7. Are treads, nosings (the front of the stair tread) and carpeting in good repair? yes no 8. Are carpets on the stairway, as well as at the top and bottom of the stairs, securely anchored? yes no 9. Do you always maintain an unobstructed view when using the stairs? yes no 10. Are all stairway lights in working order? yes noKitchen 1. Are your stove and sink areas well-lit? yes no 2. Do you wipe up spills immediately? yes no 3. Is your kitchen adequately wired to safely operate electrical appliances, and do you dry your hands before using an electrical appliance? yes no 2
  • 5. 4. Do you keep pot handles away from the stove front and other burners, and do you use pot holders, always making sure they are dry? yes no 5. Do you use a stool or stepladder when reaching into high cupboards? yes no 6. Do you store sharp knives in a special rack, compartment, or tray? yes no 7. Do you keep household cleaners, disinfectants, and insecticides in their original containers, separate from food and out of the reach of children? yes no 8. Are emergency phone numbers (security, fire, doctor, utilities, veterinarian) posted near the phone? yes no 9. Do you avoid wearing loose, flowing clothes around heat sources? yes no 10. Do you know never to pour water on a grease fire? yes noBathroom 1. Do bathtubs and showers have nonskid mats, decals, or textured surfaces? yes no 2. Do you ensure that electrical appliances are never used in or near the bathtub? yes no 3. Do you replace cracked or frayed electrical appliances and extension cords? yes no 4. Are medicines clearly labeled and do you always read the label before taking any medication? yes no 5. Are medicines, cosmetics, and other personal hygiene products stored safely out of the reach of children? yes no 3
  • 6. Off-Job Safety Booklet 6. Are night-lights located in bathrooms used by children and seniors? yes no 7. Do you always supervise small children when they are bathing? yes no 8. Do you avoid using aerosols near open flames or when smoking? yes no 9. Do you keep towels and shower curtains safely away from heaters? yes no 10. Do you store razors, scissors, and other sharp objects safely out of the reach of small children? yes noUtility room 1. Do you know where your main gas and water valves are located and how to close them? yes no 2. Are gas and water lines tagged so they can be identified quickly and easily? yes no 3. Do you know how to light the pilot light on a gas stove or water heater? yes no 4. Do you know where your main electrical switch is and how to turn it off? yes no 5. Are fuses or circuit breakers labeled to identify the outlets and fixtures they protect? yes no 6. Can you determine what caused a fuse to blow before replacing it and do you keep extra fuses on hand? yes no 7. Are electrical appliances properly grounded? yes no 8. Are cleaning fluids, drain openers, ammonia, and similar items stored out of the reach of children? yes no 4
  • 7. 9. Do you discard trash properly? yes no 10. Do you store combustible chemicals and materials away from heat sources? yes noWorkshop, garage, and driveway 1. Is your workshop well-ventilated and are work areas well-lit? yes no 2. Do you always use the proper tool for the job and promptly discard and replace broken or badly worn tools? yes no 3. Do you keep tools out of the reach of small children? yes no 4. Are extension cords appropriate for the wattage of the tool for which they are intended? yes no 5. Are tools properly grounded and are they disconnected or switches locked when not in use? yes no 6. Do you wear safety glasses when drilling, sanding, or performing other eye-threatening work? yes no 7. Is your garage well-lit and switches located at the doors? yes no 8. Is your garage in order, with tools in place and flammable liquids stored in safety cans? yes no 9. Do you keep the garage door open when running the car engine? yes no 10. Do you check the area around the car before backing up? yes no5
  • 8. Off-Job Safety BookletOutside 1. Are garden tools returned to their storage racks after use? yes no 2. Do you get help when performing heavy lifting or difficult jobs? yes no 3. Are broken walkways and driveways repaired promptly? yes no 4. Do you keep children and pets at a safe distance when you mow the lawn? yes no 5. Do you shut off the mower when cleaning, adjusting, or emptying the grass catcher? yes no 6. Do you refuel your lawn mower when the motor is cold? yes no 7. Do you maintain your ladders by replacing loose rungs, worn ladder shoes, and frayed ropes on extension ladders and do you store ladders out of the reach of children? yes no 8. Are children’s swings, slides, and other outdoor play toys maintained in safe condition? yes no 9. Is your yard free of broken glass, nail-studded boards, and other litter? yes no10. Do you use extra care when installing window screens using a ladder, especially in windy weather? yes no 6
  • 9. Slips, Trips, and Falls at Home E very year, slips, trips, and falls result in many off-job injuries; some of these injuries can be serious enough to land you in the emergency room.Prevent slips, trips, and falls by identifying and correcting thehazards associated with these incidents.Start at the front door • Make sure that there’s a contrast in color and texture of flooring to help accentuate height.Make a living room livable • Place throw rugs over rug-liners or choose rugs with nonskid backs to reduce the chance of slipping. • Avoid placing shag rugs, as they can cause falls by getting caught on shoes. • Arrange furniture so that they provide open pathways, clear of obstructions. • Avoid having glass tables, which can be especially dangerous should you trip and fall into one. Instead, choose sturdy wooden tables with rounded corners.7
  • 10. Off-Job Safety Booklet • Keep your living room floor tidy from things you can trip over like toys, tools, or books. • Secure all telephone and electrical cords out of walkways.Step in and out of bathrooms safely • Install handrails near your bath, shower, and toilet. • Use nonslip mats in the bathroom; a bathmat on the floor, and an appropriate mat or adhesive safety strips or decals in the bathtub or shower. • Always keep your bathroom floor clean and dry by wiping up wet floors immediately. • Use a soap dish to keep soap and other items off the bathtub or shower floor. • Remove soap buildup regularly from bathtubs or showers to prevent slipping. Keep the kitchen safe for cooking • Wipe up spills immediately. • Always use appropriate stepladders or stools when reaching items stored in high cabinets or on high shelves. 8
  • 11. Going up or down the stairs safely • Keep staircases well-lit with light switches installed at the top and the bottom. • Ensure that handrails are installed on all stairways and steps. • Install safety gates at the top and bottom of the stairs if you have small children. • Keep stairways clear of clutter and never use the stairs as temporary storage or for displaying decorative items. • Avoid placing throw rugs at the top, bottom, or on the staircase. • Make sure all rugs have skid-resistant backing and the edges are held down with carpet tape. • Check your stairs regularly for worn or loose carpeting or protruding carpet tacks, and to ensure that all steps are in good condition. • Install antislip tread if your steps have a smooth surface, to provide safer traction. • Always hold onto handrails when going up or down the stairs. • Avoid carrying vision blocking loads. Carry a small enough load so you can see where you are stepping and to easily keep one hand free to hold onto the handrail. • Always remember to go slow — rushing or running on stairs is asking for a fall.9
  • 12. Off-Job Safety BookletUsing ladders safely • Only use a ladder that is in good condition. If your ladder has any defects, have it fixed or replaced immediately. • Set a straight or extension ladder at a 4:1 slope (i.e., for every 4 m height, set the ladder at a 1 m distance from the structure) and ensure it is stable before climbing up. • Set the ladder up on a firm, level footing. Have three points of contact on the ladder — two hands and one foot, or two feet and one hand while climbing; and two feet and one hand while working. Ask someone to hold the ladder steady. • Avoid overreaching. Use a ladder appropriate for the height you are trying to reach. 10
  • 13. Fire SafetyF ire poses a serious threat to everyone in your home. These basic preventive measures can help you minimize the risk of fireand related injuries: • Ensure the electrical wiring in your home is installed properly and in good condition. • Never overload electrical circuits. Be cautious when using extension cords and multiple sockets. • Frequently examine electric heaters, cooking equipment, and other appliances to ensure that they are in good operating condition. Replace frayed cords and broken or loose plugs. • Store oily cloths safely away from heat sources in closed metal containers. Discard trash promptly. • Store flammable liquids in containers specifically designed and approved for this use. Keep containers safely away from heat sources. • Keep appropriate fire extinguishers in your home and know how to use them properly. • Install smoke detectors on every floor of your home, especially outside bedrooms, and make sure they’re properly maintained.11
  • 14. Off-Job Safety Booklet • Never smoke in bed! It’s the number one cause of fire-related fatalities. Make sure that ashtrays are large and deep, and that cigarette butts are fully extinguished. • Develop an escape plan in case you have to evacuate the house in a fire, and make sure that every family member knows the proper evacuation procedures. Designate a meeting place outside so that you can easily determine if all your family members escaped safely. Remind family members to never go back inside a burning building no matter what. • If you live in a multi-story house, make sure there’s an escape route out of upstairs windows. • Post the phone number of the local fire department near all telephones in your home and make sure that every member of the family knows how to report a fire.Kitchen fireKitchen or grease fires are a leading cause of home fires. Take thesesteps to avoid them: • Never leave cooking unattended. • Keep appliances clean. • Wear close-fitting clothing when you’re cooking. • Heat oil slowly — prefer to use temperature-controlled frying pans. • Turn pot handles in. • Don’t overload electrical outlets. • Only use microwave safe utensils and cookware in microwave ovens. • Keep combustibles away from the stove. 12
  • 15. Despite your best safetyefforts, a fire in your kitchenmay still start. If so, followthese actions to put it out: • Smother a grease fire — never put water on a cooking fire! If a cooking pan catches fire, turn off the burner, put on an oven mitt, and slide an appropriate size lid onto the pan. If food in the oven catches fire, keep the door shut and turn the oven off. If the fire doesn’t go out, call the fire department. • Keep the microwave door shut — if a fire starts in your microwave, keep the door shut and turn off the appliance, then unplug it. If you open the door, you will feed oxygen to the fire, making it burn more. • Use a fire extinguisher if necessary — make sure you know how to use it before a fire starts. A multipurpose class A:B:C extinguisher is best for kitchen use.13
  • 16. Off-Job Safety BookletElectrical SafetyE lectricity is an essential part of our daily life. It’s so commonplace that at times we forget the different hazardsthat it can cause. Follow these simple rules to ensure electricalsafety at home: • Never force a plug into an outlet if it doesn’t fit properly. • Put safety covers on all unused outlets accessible to children. • Don’t plug too many extension or appliance cords into one outlet. • Make sure outlets don’t have loose-fitting plugs, which can overheat and cause a fire. • Make sure wall plates are on every outlet and are in good condition. • Make sure that outlets and switch plates are not hot to touch. • Don’t nail or staple cords to the wall, baseboard, or any other object. • Inspect electrical cords regularly to make sure they’re in good condition. • Extension cords should only be used on a temporary basis, never in place of permanent wiring. • Turn off electrical equipment before unplugging it; never use wet hands to remove a plug. • Unplug electrical equipment by firmly grasping the plug itself, never by pulling the cord. 14
  • 17. • Never carry household appliances by the cord. • Keep all electrical appliances away from water. • Use the proper wattage and type of bulb for each light fixture and ensure that the bulb is screwed in securely. • Install ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs) in wet locations or near a water source (e.g., in the bathroom and kitchen). GFCIs are used to help prevent shocks, burns, electrocutions, and fires by automatically shutting off when the circuit is interrupted. • Make sure light fixtures (e.g., table or floor lamps) are off whenever a room will remain unoccupied for an extended time period. • Make sure space heaters are positioned at least 1 m away from combustible materials, such as bedding, clothing, curtains, and rugs. • Make sure portable heaters are plugged directly into an outlet not into an extension cord and are turned off and unplugged when not in use. • For outdoor use, make sure extension cords are marked for outdoor use and rated for the power needs of your tools. • Keep outdoor electrical outlets covered and dry. • Make sure electrical outlets around pools, ponds, and hot tubs are equipped with GFCIs. • Know where underground electrical lines are located on your property.15
  • 18. Off-Job Safety BookletAccidental PoisoningE ach year many people are accidentally poisoned. The causes of poisoning often vary according to age. Children younger than6 years of age, for example, are at a greater risk of being poisonedby household cleaners or products because they are curious and liketo put things in their mouths. Older adults who take medication arepoisoned by taking too much of a medication, the wrong kind, ora mixture of medication. Here are ways to help poison-proof yourhome room by room. Bathroom • Place all medication inside childproof cabinets that lock. • Keep cosmetics and other bathroom products, such as mouthwash, away from children’s reach. • Use child-resistant caps and keep medication lids tightly closed. • Never take medication in front of a child or refer to it as candy. Children often mimic adult actions. • Always follow the doctor’s recommended dosage or the dosage on the label. • Never give medication to your child in the dark; you may give the wrong dosage or even the wrong medication. • Keep medicines in their original containers to prevent the wrong medication being taken by mistake. 16
  • 19. • Discard old and outdated medicines by flushing them down the toilet.Bedroom • Keep personal care items, such as hair sprays, perfume, and nail polish removers, away from children’s reach. • Keep mothballs and crystals in child-resistant containers. • Only allow children to use toys and art supplies that are nontoxic and lead free.Living room • Visitors may carry medications in coat pockets, jackets, and purses; make sure to hang garments and store purses out of children’s reach. • Make sure items used in your home are lead free. • Know the properties of all indoor and outdoor plants. Remove any poisonous plants from your home and garden.Kitchen • Never store cleaning products and food in the same area. • Store cleaning products in locked cabinets away from the sight and reach of children. • Keep all cleaning products in their original containers. • Never remove product labels. They contain important safety and emergency information. • Never leave opened cleaning products unattended. • Always return a product to its proper storing place after use and make sure that you close it properly.17
  • 20. Off-Job Safety BookletGarage • Store all hazardous products, such as pesticides, lawn chemicals, paint and paint thinners, and automotive products, on high shelves or locked cabinets away from children’s reach.Keeping seniors safe frompoisoning • Make sure that the older members of your family always turn on the light when taking medication at night and double-check the doctor’s instructions for the appropriate dosage. 18
  • 21. Food SafetyT he potential for bacterial contamination is what makes eating out in restaurants a safety concern. Food can be contaminatedwith harmful bacteria if it has contact with: • Pests (flies, rats, etc.). • People with poor hygiene. • Contaminated tools (e.g., when the same cutting board is used for both raw and cooked food without being thoroughly washed in between). • Foods that are contaminated (e.g., when juice from thawing chicken drips onto salad greens). • Food that’s not kept at the right temperature (e.g., food that has been left at room temperature for more than two hours).Here are some things to look for when choosingwhere to eat out or buy ready-made food.Danger signs • Dirty public areas such as dirty toilets and bathrooms. If the areas you can see are not clean and managed well, imagine the state of the areas you cannot see. • Dirty tables, crockery, cutlery, and glassware. • Staff with dirty hands or fingernails, dirty aprons, or dirty hair that is not tied back.19
  • 22. Off-Job Safety Booklet • Overflowing trash bins or bags full of trash outside the premises that can attract pests and flies. • Hair, insects, or other foreign objects in food.Good signs • Food that is very hot when served. Cold foods, such as salads, that are properly cold when served. • In open buffet, a fresh batch of food is brought out when a batch is finished (an old batch of food should never be topped up with a fresh one). • Self-service fridges are properly cold. • Staff hygiene training certificates posted on the walls or food safety instructions posted in food preparation areas. 20
  • 23. ChokingW orldwide, thousands of children die of choking-related deaths every year. These tragic deaths are often the resultof improper adult supervision. The best way to avoid choking is byapplying preventive measures. Be aware of toys • Pay close attention to the age recommendations on the package. • Never let younger children play with toys designated for older children. • Teach older children to put their toys away and out of the reach of younger children. • Make frequent checks around the house to make sure that toys are safely put away. Remember to check under furniture and between cushions. • Never give a small child a small toy, including toys small enough to fit through a 3 cm circle, toys that are smaller than 6 cm long, small toy cars with removable rubber wheels, marbles, and small balls.Other dangerous items • Keep coins, batteries, pens and caps, nails, rings, and other round objects that can fit into a child’s mouth out of children’s reach. • Never leave uninflated or inflated balloons where children can get to them.21
  • 24. Off-Job Safety Booklet • Keep floors, tables, and cabinet tops free of small objects that could be swallowed. • When visiting family and friends, inspect and remove choking hazards before allowing your child to wander around.Serve safe food • Insist your child sits down when eating, preferably at the table. • Encourage your child to eat slowly and chew his/her food well. • Never feed your child in a moving vehicle and don’t let a child suck on candies or eat food while lying down. • When serving hotdogs, slice each one down lengthwise and then cut it into small pieces. • Cut meat into very small bite-size pieces. • Slice round fruit like grapes into quarters. • Cut raw vegetables into small pieces. 22
  • 25. DrowningD rowning is a leading cause of death for children. A drowning can happen very quickly and in very little water (3 to 5 cm).Here are some guidelines you can follow to prevent your childrenfrom drowning at home: Bathtubs • Never leave a baby alone in the bathtub; always keep the baby within arm’s reach. • Don’t leave a baby in the care of another child. • Never leave your baby unattended to answer the phone, door, or for any other reason — not even for a second. If you must leave, take the baby with you. • Don’t rely on a bath seat as a substitute for proper supervision; it’s only a bathing aid, not a safety device. • Never use a baby bath seat in a nonskid, slip resistant bathtub as the suction cups will not adhere to the bathtub surface or can detach unexpectedly. • Make sure to always drain the bathtub from water after each use. Children can drown in very little water.23
  • 26. Off-Job Safety Booklet Buckets • Never leave a bucket containing even a small amount of liquid unattended. When you have finished using a bucket, empty it immediately. • Store buckets where children cannot reach them.Toilets • Keep the toilet lid down and consider using a toilet latch to stop young children from opening the lid. Better yet, keep bathroom doors closed. 24
  • 27. Playground SafetyP laying at playgrounds promotes the healthy development of children and gives them the opportunity to run, climb,and explore with other children. However, many children visitthe emergency room every year because of playground-relatedinjuries. Here are some steps to help ensure children’s safety atplaygrounds. Playground supervision • Constantly supervise your child at play. • Make sure that your child plays on age-appropriate equipment. • Give on-the-scene instructions for safe play and then reinforce the instructions during playtime. • Stop horseplay and equipment misuse immediately.Soft surfaces • The fall zone (the area under and around the equipment where a child falling from the equipment would land) should extend at least 2 m in all directions from the edge of the equipment. • The fall zone surface should be free of standing water, debris, and sharp objects. • The fall zone should be filled with loose-fill material that cushions falls, such as sand and wood chips. Concrete, asphalt, and grass are too hard to cushion falls.25
  • 28. Off-Job Safety BookletSafe equipmentSwings • They should be equipped with soft plastic seats, not metal or wooden ones. Metal seats can get too hot in the summer causing burns, while wooden seats can have splinters or sharp components that can injure. • Swings should be set far enough away from other equipment to prevent hitting children. • Each swing should support a maximum of two seats spaced at least 60 cm apart. • Younger children should only use full-bucket seats; half-bucket seats are dangerous for babies and toddlers because their small bodies can slide out of them. Slides • Slides should be well anchored and have firm handrails and good traction on the steps. • Each slide should have a bar at the top to ensure that children sit before they go down. • No gaps should appear between the slide itself and the platform. • Children should not wear clothing with drawstrings, which can get caught on slide parts. 26
  • 29. Seesaws • Don’t allow children to use adjustable seesaws with chains because they can crush their hands under the chain. • Allow children to only use seesaws that have a tire or some other object under the seat to keep it from hitting the ground.Climbing equipment • Children younger than 4 years should not be allowed to use climbing equipment or horizontal ladders. • Steps and handrails should be in good condition and guardrails or barriers should surround raised platforms. • Climbing ropes should be secured both at the top and bottom.Special playground safety tips • Inspect openings that can trap children (in guardrails or between ladder rungs) to make sure they’re less than 9 cm or more than 23 cm apart. • Make sure that guardrails surround all elevated platforms and are at least 78 cm high. • Remove exposed concrete footings, tree roots, or rocks that could trip children. • Make sure that there are no sharp edges and dangerous hardware, like hooks and protruding bolts. • Limit the number of children on each piece of equipment.27
  • 30. Off-Job Safety BookletSafe playing rulesTo avoid injuries that can result from unsafe behaviors, parentsmust instruct and enforce these safe play rules.Swinging • Always sit in the center of the swing; never stand or kneel. • Hold on with both hands. • Stop the swing before getting off. • Walk around the swing, but not too close to the front or the back. • Never allow a child to push another child on the swing. • Only one person per swing. • Never swing empty swings; never twist chains. • Never put head and/or feet through exercise rings on the swing sets. Sliding • Hold on with both hands as you go up and down the steps; take one step at a time. • Never go up the sliding surface or the frame. • Keep at least one arm’s length from other children. • Slide down one child at a time, with feet first and always sitting up. 28
  • 31. • Make sure no one is in front of the slide before sliding down. • Wait your turn patiently, avoid pushing or shoving. • Leave the bottom of the slide after you have taken your turn. Seesawing • Sit facing each other, not leaning back. • Keep a firm hold with both hands. • Never stand or run on the board. • Keep feet out from underneath the board as it descends.Climbing • Use both hands. • Be careful when climbing down and watch out for others climbing up. • Avoid using the climbing equipment where there are too many children. • Start all from the same end of the equipment and move in the same direction. • Stay well behind the person in front and watch out for swinging feet. • Never use the climbing equipment when it is wet. • Avoid speed contests or trying to cover too large a distance in one move. • Drop from the bars with knees slightly bent and land on both feet.29
  • 32. Off-Job Safety BookletToy SafetyP laying with toys is an essential part of every child’s life. Unfortunately, some toys can be dangerous for children. Poorlyconstructed toys or toys that are inappropriate for a child’s age andmaturity level can lead to injuries and even death. (Information onhow to prevent choking on toys can be found on page 21.) • Look for good design and quality construction in the toy you buy. • Choose a toy that is appropriate for your child’s age and maturity level and that is lead free. • Carefully inspect the toy before purchasing it. Make sure that all toy parts are properly secured so no part can accidentally be swallowed. Avoid toys that have small, removable parts that can be swallowed. • Consider the noise level of the toy. Some toys, such as pop guns, can produce noise levels that can damage hearing. • Before letting your child play with the new toy, discard all accompanying plastic wrappers or bags. These pose a risk for suffocation if children place them over their head. • Check toys regularly to ensure that they are not damaged or pose hazards. Throw away broken toys. • Store toys in open, plastic crates or on low shelving units easily accessible to children. 30
  • 33. • Toys that are used outside should be stored properly when children finish playing with them. A previously safe toy can become dangerous if damaged or rusted by prolonged exposure to moisture. • Always supervise your child at all times even when he/she is playing with a toy that is recommended for his/her age group.31
  • 34. Off-Job Safety BookletSports SafetyG etting plenty of physical activity by being involved in sports is important for children’s developing bodies and minds.Parents can take steps to help ensure that their children avoidsport-related injuries. Use proper protective equipment • Your child should wear properly fitting, appropriate protective equipment and safety gear designed for his/her sport. • Choose protective equipment that has been approved by a recognized authority such as the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. • Keep all equipment properly maintained to ensure its effectiveness.Play only in appropriate and safe areas • Playing fields should be safe and well-maintained to avoid holes and ruts that might cause injuries to kids from trips or falls. • Each sport should be played on the appropriate surface. For example, high impact sports like basketball must be played on wooden basketball courts instead of concrete and football must be played on grass. 32
  • 35. Provide adequate adult supervision and commitmentto safety • Select leagues and teams that value the importance of safety and injury prevention during sports. • Choose coaches trained and certified in Basic Life Support (BLS) and First Aid. • Enroll your child in a team with a coach who enforces safe playing rules and requires the use of personal protective equipment.Ensure proper preparation for the activity • Make sure that children are matched in teams and types of sports according to their skill level, size, and physical and emotional maturity. • Make sure your child is adequately prepared for the sport with warm-up exercises and training sessions before participating in actual competitive games. • Make sure your child drinks plenty of fluids before and after the activity.Ensure after-the-game precautions • Cool down. Cooling down exercises will help loosen the body’s muscles that have tightened during sports. • Injuries heal completely. If your child gets injured during a game, minimize long-term damage by allowing the affected area to heal completely before participating in the sport again. • Don’t rush. It’s important for your child to ease back into a routine if he/she has been inactive for a long period of time. For example, after a long summer break, children should begin physical activity before their sport officially begins.33
  • 36. Off-Job Safety BookletSun ProtectionS taying cool in Saudi Arabia is more than a matter of comfort; it’s also a safety concern. Every year, high temperatures putpeople at risk for heat-related illnesses. Protecting babies from the heat Babies need special care during hot weather • A tepid bath can help keep your baby cool on a very hot day. The water should be warm enough to be comfortable; cool or cold water should not be used. • Dress your baby in light, comfortable clothing such as a singlet or diaper. Make sure, however, that their bodies are completely covered if out in the sun. • Make sure that the room temperature is comfortable but not too cold if the air conditioning is on. • Avoid traveling with your baby in a vehicle in hot weather, if possible. If you must, travel early in the day or in the evening. Babies can overheat quickly in cars so keep them in the shade as much as possible. Remember that babies’ skin can burn by sunlight passing through car windows. Never leave a baby alone in a car. 34
  • 37. Prickly heatPrickly heat is a rash of tiny red pin-head spots and tiny blisters thatcommonly occurs on parts of the skin that remain moist, such as thebaby’s diaper area or under the chin. Protect your baby’s skin fromprickly heat by: • Keeping the baby’s skin dry. For example, remove the baby’s diaper from time to time to allow the skin to dry. • Applying creams, such as zinc and cod-liver oil, on the affected area of the baby’s skin. • Changing the baby’s clothes more often and giving tepid baths.Babies and the sunA baby’s skin is thin and has not yet developed the natural protectionneeded from the sun, making it more susceptible to burns and sundamage. For protection from the sun: • Keep your baby in the shade as much as possible. • Cover your baby’s body, arms, and legs with clothing, and his/her head with a wide-brimmed hat. • Apply to your baby’s skin sunscreen made for babies or toddlers, with sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15.DehydrationIf babies don’t get enough to drink or they lose a lot of fluid throughdiarrhea, vomiting, or sweating, they can become dehydrated. Toprevent dehydration: • Provide breastfed babies with extra breast milk to meet their fluid needs. • Provide bottle-fed babies with extra drinks of cool, boiled water.35
  • 38. Off-Job Safety BookletSymptoms of dehydration in babies • Appearing unwell. • More irritable than usual. • Weight loss. • Dried skin. • Sunken fontanel. • Fewer wet diapers than usual.Most babies can recover from minor dehydration with extra fluids. Seekimmediate medical assistance if you suspect that your baby is seriouslydehydrated.Heat strokeHeat stroke, a serious or fatal condition,occurs when too much water is lost andthe baby’s or child’s temperature starts torise.Symptoms of heat stroke in babies orchildren • Rising body temperature. • Smaller amounts of urine than usual; dark colored urine. • Increased thirst with decreased drinking as the baby gets weaker. • Dry mouth and eyes. • Headaches and muscle cramps. • Drowsiness and lethargy. • Confusion, shortness of breath, and vomiting. • Coma. 36
  • 39. What to do for heat strokeIf your baby or child has any of the signs of heat stroke, seek immediatemedical treatment. While waiting for medical help, you should keepyour child covered with cool, damp cloths. Keep trying to give your childsmall amounts of fluids — unless she/he is unconscious and unable toswallow.Protecting yourself from the heatCauses of heat-related illnessesHeat-related illnesses, ranging from mild heat rash to severe heat stroke,occur when your body cannot cool itself. As the air temperature rises,your body stays cool by releasing fluid onto the skin. When sweatingisn’t enough to cool your body, your body temperature rises and youmay become ill. Prevent heal-related illnesses by: • Scheduling outdoor activities for the cooler time of the day, before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m. • Taking frequent breaks and drinking water or other non- caffeinated fluids every 15 to 20 minutes, even if you don’t feel thirsty during an outdoor activity. • Wearing light-weight, light- colored, loose-fitting clothing. • Protecting yourself from the sun by wearing a wide-brimmed hat or using an umbrella. Don’t forget to apply sunscreen. • Gradually exposing yourself to the hot weather so your body can adapt to the heat.37
  • 40. Off-Job Safety BookletHeat rashAlso known as prickly heat, is a condition that occurs in hot, humidenvironments.Symptoms of heat rash • Tiny blister spots on the skin. • Prickling sensation on the skin.What to do to treat a heat rash • Clean skin. • Apply mild drying lotion. • Wear loose clothing. • Rest in a cool place, and allow your skin to dry.Heat crampsHeat cramps are painful muscle spasms that occur from drinking largequantities of water without replacing lost body salt.Symptoms of heat cramps • Painful spasms of leg, arm, or abdominal muscles. • Heavy sweating and thirst.What to do to treat heat cramps • Loosen clothing. • Drink lightly salted beverages such as sport drinks. • Rest in a cool area. 38
  • 41. Heat exhaustion Heat exhaustion happens when one is exposed to heat for a prolonged period of time and the body’s effort to cool itself results in significant loss of body fluid and certain essential minerals, such as sodium and potassium. If not treated, heat exhaustion can lead to serious health problems. Symptoms of heat exhaustion • Excessive sweating. • Cool, moist, pale skin. • Vomiting. • Anxiety, confusion, fainting, and decreased level of mental function. What to do to treat heat exhaustion • Move him/her to a cool, shaded area. • Administer fluids by mouth (0.15 L or half a cup of water every 15 minutes). • Remove or loosen tight clothing. • Apply cool water on the skin.Heat strokeHeat stroke occurs when the body’s temperature-regulating system fails.A malfunction of the temperature regulation center in your brain causessweating to stop and your body temperature to rapidly rise above 40 °C 39
  • 42. Off-Job Safety Booklet(104 °F). At such high temperatures, vital organs are prone to damageand failure.Symptoms of heat stroke • Blurred vision, dizziness, and nausea. • Hot, dry, spotted skin. • Mental confusion. • Delirium, generalized convulsion, loss of consciousness. • Respiratory and cardiac arrest.What to do to treat heat stroke • Call the emergency medical services (in Saudi Aramco communities, dial 110; in the local communities, dial 997) immediately. • Move the victim to a cool, shaded area. • Place wet sheets around the body or wrap ice in clean cloths and place them on the victim’s wrist, ankles, and neck to cool the large blood vessels. • Monitor his/her breathing and pulse if the victim is unconscious. • Perform Basic Life Support if the victim has no pulse and only if you’re trained to do so. 40
  • 43. Water Safety Pool safety Community pool safety rules Follow these important safety rules when visiting a community pool • Obey the instructions of the lifeguard on duty. • Never leave a child unsupervised near or inside the pool. Appoint responsible and capable adults as designated watchers who can take turns. Don’t rely on older siblings to provide adequate supervision. • Don’t rely on lifeguards to supervise your children. • Obey the warning signs and notices around the pool. • Make sure children don’t enter spas or hot tubs. • Teach your children good pool safety habits, such as no running, dunking, pushing, or jumping on others. • Never assume your children cannot drown because they had swimming lessons or are wearing flotation devices. • Don’t consider air-filled devices and toys, such as water wings or even approved flotation devices, as substitutes for adult supervision. • Don’t allow children to play as though they are drowning. A false alarm may mask a real emergency and delay rescue. • Don’t allow diving from the side of the pool unless the water is at least 1.5 m deep.41
  • 44. Off-Job Safety Booklet • Never allow your children to swim immediately after eating. • Make sure that you and your children wear proper swimsuits. Wearing loose clothing can contribute to drowning.Home pool safety rulesA swimming pool in the yard can be an invitation to a drowning incidentfor young children. In addition to the community safety rules, poolowners can take the following precautions to help make their homepools less dangerous: • Never allow children near the pool area without responsible adult supervision. • Surround your pool with a fence or barrier that is at least 1.7 m high and has childproof gate latches. The latch should be self-closing and placed at the top of the gate so that it’s inaccessible to children. Never leave a gate to the pool area propped open. • Keep the area outside the fence free of objects, such as chairs, tables, and benches, that could help children climb over the fence and gain access to the pool. • Keep rescue equipment, such as a shepherd’s hook, by the pool. • Keep a telephone and emergency telephone numbers posted near the pool. 42
  • 45. • Teach your children how to swim. Enroll them in swim classes when they’re approximately 3 years of age. • Caregivers and baby-sitters should learn Basic Life Support. • Keep CD players, radios, and other electrical equipment away from the pool. • Don’t let children with loose, long hair near a pool outlet. The suction can cause hair or body entrapment and drowning. Make sure that they tie their hair up or wear a bathing cap. • Keep kids out of the pool in a thunderstorm. Beach safety If you’re planning a day at the beach, follow the guidelines below to ensure your own and your family’s safety. Learn to avoid drowning at the beach by following these guidelines: • First and foremost you and your family should learn how to swim. Learning to swim is the best way to stay safe in and around water. • Wear proper swimming attire. Never wear long, loose-fitting clothing, such as an abaya or thobe, in water. Swimming fully clothed adds a lot of extra weight and can increase your chance of drowning. • Always swim with a buddy; never swim alone. • Swim in supervised areas only.43
  • 46. Off-Job Safety Booklet • Pay attention to local weather conditions and forecasts. Stop swimming at the first sign of bad weather and return to shore. • Always listen to the lifeguard’s advice and heed any warnings. • Stay away from piers, pilings, and diving platforms when in the water. • Watch for aquatic life. Water plants and animals can be dangerous. • Don’t try to swim against a current if caught in one. Swim gradually out of the current by swimming across it.Stay safe at the shore • Protect your skin. Limit the amount of direct sunlight you receive between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when the sun’s rays are the strongest and always wear sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15. • Drink plenty of water regularly and often, even if you don’t feel thirsty. • Wear eye protection. Choose sunglasses that absorb at least 90% of ultraviolet (UV) sunlight. • Wear foot protection. Feet can get burned from the sand or cut from broken glass hidden beneath it. 44
  • 47. Traffic Safety Vehicle safety Safe driving means driving defensively to avoid a preventable incident. Defensive driving can improve your ability to think, observe, communicate, coordinate, and navigate in traffic. Practice these preventive measures for safe driving.Before you start driving make sure that you • Take proper driving training. • Obtain a valid Saudi driver’s license.When preparing to drive make sure that you • Inspect the vehicle’s safety equipment (e.g., spare tires, headlights and turn signals). • Inspect and maintain the vehicle’s tire pressure per the manufacturer’s specifications. • Adjust your seat so you’re 10 to 15 cm from the lower rim of the steering wheel and able to press the pedals firmly. Sit up straight. • Adjust the rearview and side mirrors. • Fasten your seat belt and make sure that all passengers are properly45
  • 48. Off-Job Safety Booklet restrained, including children with age- and size-appropriate child restraints. See the table below for the general guidelines. Child Age Weight/Height Child RestraintBirth to 9 or 12 months Up to 9 kg Rear-Facing Baby Seat 1 year to 4 years 9 kg to 18 kg Front-Facing Toddler Seat 4 to 8 years Over 18 kg or shorter Booster Seat than 1.45 m 8 years and older Over 36 kg and taller Regular Seat Belt than 1.45 m All children under age 10 or shorter than 1.45 m must be properly restrained in the backseat. While driving make sure that you • Keep constantly alert — look ahead, in the mirrors, and over your shoulders for blind spots — so you’ll have advance warning of potentially dangerous situations. • Watch the car ahead of you — and the car ahead of that one — to give yourself extra time to stop. • Obey all traffic rules and regulations, especially speed limits. • Never use a cell phone, eat, or drink. • Never be under the influence of medications, which can cause impairment. 46
  • 49. • Learn to anticipate potential hazards. For example, a defensive driver expects the car following the bus to suddenly swerve around it into his lane. • Use the horn whenever you’re not sure another driver sees you. • At night, reduce your speed below the safe daytime speed. • Day or night reduce speed for hazardous conditions such as bad or adverse weather, broken pavement, children playing, highway construction, camel crossings, congested areas, and hills or curves that limit vision. • If you’re tired or drowsy, stop and rest.Bicycle safetyBicycles are a wonderful source of exercise and fun but they’re notwithout danger. Serious incidents have occurred from bicycle and vehiclecollisions. The following tips canhelp you prevent these types ofincidents: • Choose a bike that matches your size and the kind of riding you do. Consider the bicycle’s weight, height, and design. • Choose a bicycle with safety equipment such as a horn, a bell, a light in front, and reflectors all around. Consider having a carrier basket that can help you carry things while leaving both hands free to control the bicycle. • Always wear a helmet. Buy a helmet that meets or exceeds current international safety standards. Make sure that the helmet47
  • 50. Off-Job Safety Booklet fits correctly: it should fit one or two fingers above the eyebrows; and its straps, when strapped, should form a “V” under the ears and should feel tight when opening the mouth as wide as possible. • Repair the bicycle’s broken or worn parts immediately. Frequently check to make sure that the reflectors are clean and not damaged, the saddle and handlebars are tight and at the right height, the tires are firm with plenty of treads, the brakes work properly, the wheels are not wobbly, and the bicycle’s chain is snug and not damaged. • Obey all traffic rules and regulations when you’re riding your bike. Remember that on a bicycle you’re more vulnerable to incidents than a driver inside the steel body of a vehicle.Keep these additional tips in mind when riding your bicycle • Avoid busy streets whenever you can. • Keep your bicycle under control — don’t show off, weave, or race. • Ride with traffic, not against it. Ride as far to the right as possible. • Ride on the street and not the sidewalk, which is meant for pedestrians. • Watch for parked cars pulling out or car doors opening suddenly. • Travel in single file when riding with others and always allow one full bike length between bicycles. 48
  • 51. • Steer with both hands on the handlebars except to signal when turning, stopping, or leaving the curb. • Don’t ride double on a bicycle or carry an oversized package, either of which can block your vision and throw you off balance. • Come to a complete stop, look, and listen before entering a street from a sidewalk, driveway, or alley. Drivers may not see you. • When riding at night, wear light-colored or reflective clothing. • Be prepared to brake at intersections; don’t pump the pedals as you approach. Get off and walk your bike across busy streets, staying well inside the white lines and crosswalk.Pedestrian safetyBeing a pedestrian in traffic puts you at risk. Children from 1 to 12 yearsold are at risk when in traffic. It is your responsibility to teach themhow to stay safe. Demonstrate to your children the right way to be safepedestrians: • Never walk between parked cars, jaywalk, or cross against traffic signals or lights. • Stay on the sidewalk. If there is no sidewalk, walk on the left shoulder, as far to the left as possible, facing the direction of traffic. • Before stepping off a curb, look left, right, and left again for traffic. Look over your shoulders for vehicles. Make eye contact with drivers. Just because you see a driver doesn’t mean that the driver sees you.49
  • 52. Off-Job Safety Booklet • Be alert for turning vehicles. Never step out in front of a turning vehicle. Drivers of turning vehicles are typically looking for an opening in traffic and may fail to notice pedestrians. • Cross at intersections or crosswalks, where possible. Obey all traffic signals and walk signs. Wait until all vehicles stop or clear the intersection before stepping off the curb.• See and be seen. Never dart out into the street. Drivers need to see you to avoid you. Make eye contact with the driver when crossing busy streets. Always wear brightly colored or reflective clothing. Consider carrying a flashlight when walking at night.• Look for a car’s reversing lights when walking in parking lots or past driveways. A car’s reverse lights will indicate the vehicle’s direction. Parking lot incidents happen when pedestrians don’t see vehicles that are backing out or drivers don’t notice pedestrians before putting the car in reverse. 50
  • 53. First Aid Basics Burns First degree burns Classified as minor, they are also called superficial burns. This type of burn affects the outer layer of the skin, which becomes painful and red in color. While this type of burn generally heals well by itself, your proper action can help the healing process.Treatment • Stop the burning process by cooling the area. Apply a cool, wet cloth to the burn or immerse the burned area in cool — not ice — water until the victim no longer feels the pain. • Don’t apply ointments or other substances to the burn but keep it covered with a sterile, nonadhesive bandage or clean cloth.Second degree burnsAlso called partial thickness burns, which go deeper into the skin intothe dermis area. This type of burn is generally accompanied by blisteringof the skin, which may leave a scar.51
  • 54. Off-Job Safety Booklet Treatment Although this type of burn is usually treatable with basic first aid, a burned victim should seek medical attention. If the burn covers a large area of the body, cover loosely with dry, sterile dressing. If the burn is smaller than the palm of the hand, to treat it you should: • Immerse the burned area in cool water until the pain stops. • Don’t clean it, apply ointment, or break the blisters. • Treat for shock and elevate the burned area above the level of the heart.Third degree burnsAlso called total thickness burns,which penetrate through the layersof the skin, and may burn muscle andother tissue. This type of burn can belife threatening. The burned area willappear charred or blackened or whiteand leathery.Treatment • Call for emergency medical services (in Saudi Aramco communities, dial 110; in the local communities, dial 997) immediately. • While waiting for medical help to arrive, cool the area with water until the pain stops, then carefully remove clothing if it’s not sticking to the skin. Don’t use ice/ice water. 52
  • 55. • Cover loosely with dry, sterile dressings or with a dry clean sheet if the burn is large. Don’t clean, apply ointment, or break blisters. • Treat for shock and elevate the burned area above the level of the heart. • Monitor the victim’s breathing and administer Basic Life Support if necessary and if you’re trained to do so, until emergency services arrive. Chemical burns Should a chemical burn occur, immediately call 110 or 997. If a harmful corrosive chemical comes in contact with the skin, flush the area with water until emergency medical services arrive. Because chemicals may give off fumes— even if you don’t smell them — you should move the victim outdoorsinto fresh air. After flushing the burn with water, cover the area with aloose, nonstick dressing.If the burn was the result of contact with a dry chemical or powder,brush the chemical off with a gloved hand before flushing the burn withwater for at least 30 minutes.If the chemical has made contact with the eye, flush the affected eyeimmediately with water from the nose outward until emergency servicesarrives.53
  • 56. Off-Job Safety BookletShockAlways treat a seriously injured personfor shock. Severe shock can cause death.Don’t attempt to give the victim anythingto drink. Seek medical help immediately.Symptoms of shock • Pale, cold, clammy skin, mottled in color. • Weak and shallow or deep but irregular breathing. • Apathy. • Nausea.Treatment • If the victim doesn’t have a head and/or neck injury, or broken hip or leg bones, place the victim on his/her back and elevate the legs about 30 cm. • If the victim has a head or neck injury, keep the victim lying flat. Don’t move the victim unless there is immediate danger. • If the victim vomits, place the victim on one side to let fluids drain from the mouth. • If the victim has difficulty breathing, place him/her in a semi-reclining position. • Cover the victim with a sheet or light blanket. Choking Adults who are around children should get proper training in First Aid to be able to help children. Proper first aid training for choking depends on the age of the child. 54
  • 57. For a conscious child older than 1 year of ageExperts recommend abdominal thrusts, often called the Heimlichmaneuver.To give abdominal thrusts• Stand behind the victim. • Wrap your arms around the victim’s waist. • Make a fist with one hand and place the thumb side of your fist, just above the navel and below the breast bone. • Grab your fist with your hand and give quick inward and upward thrusts until the object is forced out or the child becomes unconscious.For a conscious infantGive five back slaps and five chest thrusts.To give back slaps • Grasp the infant’s jaw with your thumb and fingers. • Support the back of the infant’s head and neck. • Turn the infant over face down on your forearm, with the infant’s head lower than his/her chest; rest your forearm on your thigh. Support the infant’s head and neck by firmly holding the jaw. • Give five blows forcefully between the shoulder blades.To give five chest thrusts • Sandwich the infant between your forearms. Support the head and neck.55
  • 58. Off-Job Safety Booklet • Turn the infant onto his/her back. Rest your forearm on your thigh. Keep the infant’s head lower than the chest. • Place your ring finger on the infant’s breastbone just below the nipple line. Place the middle and index fingers next to the ring finger. Remove your ring finger and compress with your middle and index fingers. If you feel the notch at the end of the breastbone, move your fingers slightly up. • Give five chest thrusts. Each thrust should be about 0.5 cm deep.If the infant or child becomes unresponsive, call for emergency medicalservices immediately (in Saudi Aramco communities, dial 110; in thelocal communities, dial 997); if you are properly trained, administer BasicLife Support techniques.PoisoningIf a poisoning occurs: • Stay calm and call the hospital (in Saudi Aramco communities, dial 110; in the local communities, dial 997). • Report the name of the product, the amount of the product that was ingested, the time that the poisoning occurred, the age and weight of the person who was poisoned, and the circumstances of the poisoning. • Follow their instructions. • Don’t induce vomiting unless told to do so. Vomiting can cause further harm if a substance was swallowed. 56
  • 59. Here are some emergency tips for certain types ofpoisonings.Inhaled poison • Take the person to fresh air immediately, if the scene is safe. • Open doors and windows. • If the person is not breathing and you are properly trained, begin Basic Life Support.Poison in the eye • Wash the eyes outward with running lukewarm water for 15 minutes continuously. • Ask the person to blink as much as possible to assist in irrigating the eye. • Don’t attempt to force the eyelids open.Poison on the skin • Remove all clothing that’s contaminated and begin to wash the skin with running water for 15 minutes.Emergency action steps1. Check the scene and the victimMake sure the scene is safe for youand any bystanders. Then check tosee if the victim is conscious. Taphim/her on the shoulder and shout:“Are you ok?”57
  • 60. Off-Job Safety Booklet2. CallIf the victim doesn’t respond, call the emergency medical services (EMS)system at once, or have someone call (in Saudi Aramco communities,dial 110; in the local communities, dial 997) or do it yourself if nobody isavailable.3. Care l. Position if necessary • If the victim is face down and you can’t tell whether or not he/she is breathing, position him/her on his/her back by kneeling facing the victim’s hips and shoulders. • Straighten his/her legs and move the arm closer to you above his/her head, the other arm along his/her body. • Place one hand under his/her head and neck and the other hand on his/her hip. Roll the victim toward you as a single unit. • Place the victim’s arm which is further from you alongside his/her body. ll. Do the primary care A. Open the airway Place one hand on the victim’s forehead and two fingers of the other hand under the bony part of the chin. Tilt the head and lift the chin. Avoid closing the victim’s mouth or pushing on the soft part under the chin. 58
  • 61. B. Check for breathing Place your ear over the victim’s mouth and nose. Look at the chest, listen and feel for breathing for five to ten seconds. If there is no breathing, give two slow breaths (1 second each breath). Cover the victim’s mouth with your lips and make a tight seal, pinch the nose shut and blow slowly for 1 ½ to 2 seconds. Pause between breaths to let air flow out. Watch the victim’s chest rise each time you breathe to make sure your breaths are going in. C. If no response, start Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) CPR is a two minute cycle of 30 chest compressions and two breaths repeated 5 times. Continue performing CPR until the victim starts to breathe on his/her own or until emergency medical services arrives.For more information on emergency action steps, Consult the SAMSO’sHealth Education’s Basic Life Support (BLS) and Standard First Aid (SFA)Booklet.First aid kitsA well-stocked first aid kit, keptwithin easy reach, is a necessity inevery home. Having supplies gatheredahead of time will help you handle anemergency at a moment’s notice. Youshould keep one first aid kit in yourhome and one in each car. Also be59
  • 62. Off-Job Safety Bookletsure to bring a first aid kit on family vacations. Include the following ineach of your first aid kits: • Sterile gauze • Adhesive tape • Adhesive bandages in several sizes • Elastic bandage • Antiseptic wipes • Antibiotic cream • Antiseptic solution (like hydrogen peroxide) • Hydrocortisone cream (1%) • Acetaminophen and ibuprofen • Tweezers • Sharp scissors • Safety pins • Disposable instant cold packs • Calamine lotion • Alcohol wipes or ethyl alcohol • Thermometer • Plastic gloves (at least 2 pairs) • Flashlight and extra batteries • First aid manual 60
  • 63. Emergency numbersLocal communities Saudi Red Crescent Authority 997 Fire/Civil Defense 998 Local Police & Security 999 Traffic Accident 993Saudi Aramco communities Ambulance/Fire/Security 110 By mobile phone: 03-872-0110 (Central Area) 03-572-0110 (Southern Area) 03-673-0110 (Northern Area) 01-285-0110 (Central Region) 02-427-0110 (Western Region)61

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