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Research Report Out: Exergaming in 2011  Barbara Chamberlin, PhD       Michelle Garza                        www.gamesforh...
WHAT WE’RE PLAYING...      www.gamesforhealth.org
www.gamesforhealth.org
www.gamesforhealth.org
www.gamesforhealth.org
www.gamesforhealth.org
www.gamesforhealth.org
www.gamesforhealth.org
www.gamesforhealth.org
www.gamesforhealth.org
www.gamesforhealth.org
www.gamesforhealth.org
www.gamesforhealth.org
Want it?to receive this informalpaper, email request to:bchamber@nmsu.edu        www.gamesforhealth.org
Physiological Impacts         www.gamesforhealth.org
Physiological ImpactsIncreases energy expenditure from sedentary orlight to moderate levels                     (Biddiss &...
Physiological ImpactsIncreases energy expenditure from sedentary orlight to moderate levels                               ...
Physiological Impacts         www.gamesforhealth.org
Physiological ImpactsResults include positive changes in:  •maximal oxygen consumption, vertical jump and systolic    bloo...
Physiological ImpactsResults include positive changes in:    •maximal oxygen consumption, vertical jump and systolic     b...
Physiological Impacts         www.gamesforhealth.org
Physiological ImpactsEnvironment, use, and individual gamecharacteristics impact physiological impacts. Forexample...     ...
Physiological ImpactsEnvironment, use, and individual gamecharacteristics impact physiological impacts. Forexample...     ...
Physiological ImpactsEnvironment, use, and individual gamecharacteristics impact physiological impacts. Forexample...     ...
Physiological ImpactsEnvironment, use, and individual gamecharacteristics impact physiological impacts. Forexample...     ...
Physiological Impacts         www.gamesforhealth.org
Physiological Impacts• Enjoyment of intervention (Wollersheim et al., 2010,Trout, 2008)                                  w...
Physiological Impacts• Enjoyment of intervention (Wollersheim et al., 2010,Trout, 2008)• Game exertion is not a deterrent ...
Physiological Impacts• Enjoyment of intervention (Wollersheim et al., 2010,Trout, 2008)• Game exertion is not a deterrent ...
Physiological Impacts• Enjoyment of intervention (Wollersheim et al., 2010,Trout, 2008)• Game exertion is not a deterrent ...
Social and Psychosocial          www.gamesforhealth.org
Social and Psychosocial• Positive impacts on bonding, group socialization, higher- self esteem, mutual support and interge...
Social and Psychosocial• Positive impacts on bonding, group socialization, higher-  self esteem, mutual support and interg...
Social and Psychosocial• Positive impacts on bonding, group socialization, higher-  self esteem, mutual support and interg...
Long-Term Effects       www.gamesforhealth.org
Long-Term Effects•Little is known about the long-term behavior changes related to  such use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Haddo...
Long-Term Effects•Little is known about the long-term behavior changes related to  such use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Haddo...
Long-Term Effects•Little is known about the long-term behavior changes related to  such use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Haddo...
Long-Term Effects•Little is known about the long-term behavior changes related to  such use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Haddo...
Long-Term Effects•Little is known about the long-term behavior changes related to  such use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Haddo...
Long-Term Effects•Little is known about the long-term behavior changes related to  such use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Haddo...
Long-Term Effects•Little is known about the long-term behavior changes related to  such use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Haddo...
Long-Term Effects•Little is known about the long-term behavior changes related to  such use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Haddo...
Academic Impacts      www.gamesforhealth.org
Academic Impacts•   Positive implications on academic achievement, absenteeism,    negative classroom behaviors, physical ...
Academic Impacts•   Positive implications on academic achievement, absenteeism,    negative classroom behaviors, physical ...
Academic Impacts•   Positive implications on academic achievement, absenteeism,    negative classroom behaviors, physical ...
Academic Impacts•   Positive implications on academic achievement, absenteeism,    negative classroom behaviors, physical ...
Academic Impacts•   Positive implications on academic achievement, absenteeism,    negative classroom behaviors, physical ...
www.gamesforhealth.org
We know games can help users    get physical activity...            www.gamesforhealth.org
how?                              why? We know games can help users     get physical activity...       with what kind of h...
Need• Data-driven and original research• Impacts of social factors• Intervention design factors• Implementation guidelines...
Active Living Research (2009). Active education: Physical education, physical activity and academic performance (pp. 8). S...
Donnelly, J., & Lambourne, K. (2011). Classroom-based physical activity, cognition, and academic achievement. Preventive M...
Levi, J.,Vinter, S., Laurent, R., & Segal, L. (2010). F as in fat: How obesity threatens americas future 2010: Trust for A...
Pate, R. R., Saunders, R. P., O’Neill, J. R., & Dowda, M. (2010). Overcoming barriers to physical activity helping youth b...
Staiano, A., & Calvert, S. (2010). Wii tennis play as physical activity in low-income african american adolescents. Paper ...
Questions & Discussion                Barbara Chamberlin, PhD                   bchamber@nmsu.edu                         ...
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  • A bit about my perspective in looking at research... I don’t consider myself a researcher, but a developer primarily. In fact, my faculty position in non-teaching... no students, no grad students... I was tenured on my ability to write and obtain grants, and produce educational games and tools, and help people use games in ways that make their lives better... which is how we got here.\n
  • A bit about my perspective in looking at research... I don’t consider myself a researcher, but a developer primarily. In fact, my faculty position in non-teaching... no students, no grad students... I was tenured on my ability to write and obtain grants, and produce educational games and tools, and help people use games in ways that make their lives better... which is how we got here.\n
  • A bit about my perspective in looking at research... I don’t consider myself a researcher, but a developer primarily. In fact, my faculty position in non-teaching... no students, no grad students... I was tenured on my ability to write and obtain grants, and produce educational games and tools, and help people use games in ways that make their lives better... which is how we got here.\n
  • A bit about my perspective in looking at research... I don’t consider myself a researcher, but a developer primarily. In fact, my faculty position in non-teaching... no students, no grad students... I was tenured on my ability to write and obtain grants, and produce educational games and tools, and help people use games in ways that make their lives better... which is how we got here.\n
  • A bit about my perspective in looking at research... I don’t consider myself a researcher, but a developer primarily. In fact, my faculty position in non-teaching... no students, no grad students... I was tenured on my ability to write and obtain grants, and produce educational games and tools, and help people use games in ways that make their lives better... which is how we got here.\n
  • A bit about my perspective in looking at research... I don’t consider myself a researcher, but a developer primarily. In fact, my faculty position in non-teaching... no students, no grad students... I was tenured on my ability to write and obtain grants, and produce educational games and tools, and help people use games in ways that make their lives better... which is how we got here.\n
  • A bit about my perspective in looking at research... I don’t consider myself a researcher, but a developer primarily. In fact, my faculty position in non-teaching... no students, no grad students... I was tenured on my ability to write and obtain grants, and produce educational games and tools, and help people use games in ways that make their lives better... which is how we got here.\n
  • A bit about my perspective in looking at research... I don’t consider myself a researcher, but a developer primarily. In fact, my faculty position in non-teaching... no students, no grad students... I was tenured on my ability to write and obtain grants, and produce educational games and tools, and help people use games in ways that make their lives better... which is how we got here.\n
  • A bit about my perspective in looking at research... I don’t consider myself a researcher, but a developer primarily. In fact, my faculty position in non-teaching... no students, no grad students... I was tenured on my ability to write and obtain grants, and produce educational games and tools, and help people use games in ways that make their lives better... which is how we got here.\n
  • A bit about my perspective in looking at research... I don’t consider myself a researcher, but a developer primarily. In fact, my faculty position in non-teaching... no students, no grad students... I was tenured on my ability to write and obtain grants, and produce educational games and tools, and help people use games in ways that make their lives better... which is how we got here.\n
  • A bit about my perspective in looking at research... I don’t consider myself a researcher, but a developer primarily. In fact, my faculty position in non-teaching... no students, no grad students... I was tenured on my ability to write and obtain grants, and produce educational games and tools, and help people use games in ways that make their lives better... which is how we got here.\n
  • A bit about my perspective in looking at research... I don’t consider myself a researcher, but a developer primarily. In fact, my faculty position in non-teaching... no students, no grad students... I was tenured on my ability to write and obtain grants, and produce educational games and tools, and help people use games in ways that make their lives better... which is how we got here.\n
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  • And when I do literary research... it is to make the case to grant funders. that researcher, development is needed... that games can be a viable way to educate, do behavior change, etc. That bias is going to be reflected in what you see today. \n
  • And when I do literary research... it is to make the case to grant funders. that researcher, development is needed... that games can be a viable way to educate, do behavior change, etc. That bias is going to be reflected in what you see today. \n
  • And when I do literary research... it is to make the case to grant funders. that researcher, development is needed... that games can be a viable way to educate, do behavior change, etc. That bias is going to be reflected in what you see today. \n
  • And when I do literary research... it is to make the case to grant funders. that researcher, development is needed... that games can be a viable way to educate, do behavior change, etc. That bias is going to be reflected in what you see today. \n
  • And when I do literary research... it is to make the case to grant funders. that researcher, development is needed... that games can be a viable way to educate, do behavior change, etc. That bias is going to be reflected in what you see today. \n
  • And when I do literary research... it is to make the case to grant funders. that researcher, development is needed... that games can be a viable way to educate, do behavior change, etc. That bias is going to be reflected in what you see today. \n
  • And when I do literary research... it is to make the case to grant funders. that researcher, development is needed... that games can be a viable way to educate, do behavior change, etc. That bias is going to be reflected in what you see today. \n
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  • trout was 8 week study in ddr\n
  • trout was 8 week study in ddr\n
  • competitive game play yields higher energy expenditure\n
  • competitive game play yields higher energy expenditure\n
  • competitive game play yields higher energy expenditure\n
  • competitive game play yields higher energy expenditure\n
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  • NOT Much done here. Physically active games actually prompt social interaction.\n
  • NOT Much done here. Physically active games actually prompt social interaction.\n
  • NOT Much done here. Physically active games actually prompt social interaction.\n
  • NOT Much done here. Physically active games actually prompt social interaction.\n
  • not much here... so here are some references that say, there aren’t much here.\n
  • not much here... so here are some references that say, there aren’t much here.\n
  • not much here... so here are some references that say, there aren’t much here.\n
  • not much here... so here are some references that say, there aren’t much here.\n
  • not much here... so here are some references that say, there aren’t much here.\n
  • not much here... so here are some references that say, there aren’t much here.\n
  • not much here... so here are some references that say, there aren’t much here.\n
  • not much here... so here are some references that say, there aren’t much here.\n
  • a word here... not journals... some news articles... not really peer reviewed stuff here... just potential. \n
  • a word here... not journals... some news articles... not really peer reviewed stuff here... just potential. \n
  • a word here... not journals... some news articles... not really peer reviewed stuff here... just potential. \n
  • a word here... not journals... some news articles... not really peer reviewed stuff here... just potential. \n
  • a word here... not journals... some news articles... not really peer reviewed stuff here... just potential. \n
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  • Transcript of "Exergames research"

    1. 1. Research Report Out: Exergaming in 2011 Barbara Chamberlin, PhD Michelle Garza www.gamesforhealth.org
    2. 2. WHAT WE’RE PLAYING... www.gamesforhealth.org
    3. 3. www.gamesforhealth.org
    4. 4. www.gamesforhealth.org
    5. 5. www.gamesforhealth.org
    6. 6. www.gamesforhealth.org
    7. 7. www.gamesforhealth.org
    8. 8. www.gamesforhealth.org
    9. 9. www.gamesforhealth.org
    10. 10. www.gamesforhealth.org
    11. 11. www.gamesforhealth.org
    12. 12. www.gamesforhealth.org
    13. 13. www.gamesforhealth.org
    14. 14. Want it?to receive this informalpaper, email request to:bchamber@nmsu.edu www.gamesforhealth.org
    15. 15. Physiological Impacts www.gamesforhealth.org
    16. 16. Physiological ImpactsIncreases energy expenditure from sedentary orlight to moderate levels (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Graves, Stratton, Ridgers, & Cable, 2008) www.gamesforhealth.org
    17. 17. Physiological ImpactsIncreases energy expenditure from sedentary orlight to moderate levels (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Graves, Stratton, Ridgers, & Cable, 2008)Games requiring upper and lower limbmovements, offer the opportunity to achievevigorous physical activity levels (Siegel, Haddock, Dubois, & Wilkin, 2009; Warburton et al., 2007, Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Trout & Christie, 2007) www.gamesforhealth.org
    18. 18. Physiological Impacts www.gamesforhealth.org
    19. 19. Physiological ImpactsResults include positive changes in: •maximal oxygen consumption, vertical jump and systolic blood pressure in college-age subjects, (Warburton et al., 2007) •heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, ventilation, respiratory rate, oxygen consumption and energy expenditure in young children (Wang & Perry, 2006) • a reduction of body fat and weight loss (Trout, 2008) www.gamesforhealth.org
    20. 20. Physiological ImpactsResults include positive changes in: •maximal oxygen consumption, vertical jump and systolic blood pressure in college-age subjects, (Warburton et al., 2007) •heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, ventilation, respiratory rate, oxygen consumption and energy expenditure in young children (Wang & Perry, 2006) • a reduction of body fat and weight loss (Trout, 2008)• www.gamesforhealth.org
    21. 21. Physiological Impacts www.gamesforhealth.org
    22. 22. Physiological ImpactsEnvironment, use, and individual gamecharacteristics impact physiological impacts. Forexample... www.gamesforhealth.org
    23. 23. Physiological ImpactsEnvironment, use, and individual gamecharacteristics impact physiological impacts. Forexample... • competition/collaboration (Staiano & Calvert, 2010, Song, Kim,Tenzek, & Lee, 2010) www.gamesforhealth.org
    24. 24. Physiological ImpactsEnvironment, use, and individual gamecharacteristics impact physiological impacts. Forexample... • competition/collaboration (Staiano & Calvert, 2010, Song, Kim,Tenzek, & Lee, 2010) • experience of players (Sell, Lillie, & Taylor, 2008) www.gamesforhealth.org
    25. 25. Physiological ImpactsEnvironment, use, and individual gamecharacteristics impact physiological impacts. Forexample... • competition/collaboration (Staiano & Calvert, 2010, Song, Kim,Tenzek, & Lee, 2010) • experience of players (Sell, Lillie, & Taylor, 2008) • weight of gaming youth (Pate, 2008) www.gamesforhealth.org
    26. 26. Physiological Impacts www.gamesforhealth.org
    27. 27. Physiological Impacts• Enjoyment of intervention (Wollersheim et al., 2010,Trout, 2008) www.gamesforhealth.org
    28. 28. Physiological Impacts• Enjoyment of intervention (Wollersheim et al., 2010,Trout, 2008)• Game exertion is not a deterrent (Haddock, Siegel, & Wilkin, 2010; Shubert, 2010, Sit, Lam, & McKenzie, 2010) www.gamesforhealth.org
    29. 29. Physiological Impacts• Enjoyment of intervention (Wollersheim et al., 2010,Trout, 2008)• Game exertion is not a deterrent (Haddock, Siegel, & Wilkin, 2010; Shubert, 2010, Sit, Lam, & McKenzie, 2010)• Attendance and participation is increased (Warburton et al., 2007) www.gamesforhealth.org
    30. 30. Physiological Impacts• Enjoyment of intervention (Wollersheim et al., 2010,Trout, 2008)• Game exertion is not a deterrent (Haddock, Siegel, & Wilkin, 2010; Shubert, 2010, Sit, Lam, & McKenzie, 2010)• Attendance and participation is increased (Warburton et al., 2007)• Perceived exertion is lower (Wittman, 2010) www.gamesforhealth.org
    31. 31. Social and Psychosocial www.gamesforhealth.org
    32. 32. Social and Psychosocial• Positive impacts on bonding, group socialization, higher- self esteem, mutual support and intergenerational socializing, for older women (Wollersheim, 2010) www.gamesforhealth.org
    33. 33. Social and Psychosocial• Positive impacts on bonding, group socialization, higher- self esteem, mutual support and intergenerational socializing, for older women (Wollersheim, 2010)• Beneficial social interaction and motivation for girls and seniors (Suhonen, 2008, Jaana, 2006) www.gamesforhealth.org
    34. 34. Social and Psychosocial• Positive impacts on bonding, group socialization, higher- self esteem, mutual support and intergenerational socializing, for older women (Wollersheim, 2010)• Beneficial social interaction and motivation for girls and seniors (Suhonen, 2008, Jaana, 2006)• Physical interaction and social interaction are linked (Mueller, 2010, Lindley et al., 2008) www.gamesforhealth.org
    35. 35. Long-Term Effects www.gamesforhealth.org
    36. 36. Long-Term Effects•Little is known about the long-term behavior changes related to such use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Haddock et al., 2009; Mellecker & McManus, 2008) www.gamesforhealth.org
    37. 37. Long-Term Effects•Little is known about the long-term behavior changes related to such use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Haddock et al., 2009; Mellecker & McManus, 2008)•Need for more in-depth analysis to investigate the long-term behavioral impacts of exergame use. www.gamesforhealth.org
    38. 38. Long-Term Effects•Little is known about the long-term behavior changes related to such use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Haddock et al., 2009; Mellecker & McManus, 2008)•Need for more in-depth analysis to investigate the long-term behavioral impacts of exergame use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Daley, 2009; Maloney et al., 2008; Martin et al., 2008; Ritterfeld et al.; Song, Kim, Tenzek, & Lee; Zwiauer, 2000) www.gamesforhealth.org
    39. 39. Long-Term Effects•Little is known about the long-term behavior changes related to such use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Haddock et al., 2009; Mellecker & McManus, 2008)•Need for more in-depth analysis to investigate the long-term behavioral impacts of exergame use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Daley, 2009; Maloney et al., 2008; Martin et al., 2008; Ritterfeld et al.; Song, Kim, Tenzek, & Lee; Zwiauer, 2000)•Promote exercise, improve user attitudes regarding physical activity, and help establish healthier daily physical activity patterns www.gamesforhealth.org
    40. 40. Long-Term Effects•Little is known about the long-term behavior changes related to such use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Haddock et al., 2009; Mellecker & McManus, 2008)•Need for more in-depth analysis to investigate the long-term behavioral impacts of exergame use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Daley, 2009; Maloney et al., 2008; Martin et al., 2008; Ritterfeld et al.; Song, Kim, Tenzek, & Lee; Zwiauer, 2000)•Promote exercise, improve user attitudes regarding physical activity, and help establish healthier daily physical activity patterns (Lin, Mamykina, Lindtner, Delajoux, & Strub, 2006) www.gamesforhealth.org
    41. 41. Long-Term Effects•Little is known about the long-term behavior changes related to such use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Haddock et al., 2009; Mellecker & McManus, 2008)•Need for more in-depth analysis to investigate the long-term behavioral impacts of exergame use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Daley, 2009; Maloney et al., 2008; Martin et al., 2008; Ritterfeld et al.; Song, Kim, Tenzek, & Lee; Zwiauer, 2000)•Promote exercise, improve user attitudes regarding physical activity, and help establish healthier daily physical activity patterns (Lin, Mamykina, Lindtner, Delajoux, & Strub, 2006)•Parental and peer involvement improved youth participant’s initial and sustained participation in exergame use www.gamesforhealth.org
    42. 42. Long-Term Effects•Little is known about the long-term behavior changes related to such use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Haddock et al., 2009; Mellecker & McManus, 2008)•Need for more in-depth analysis to investigate the long-term behavioral impacts of exergame use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Daley, 2009; Maloney et al., 2008; Martin et al., 2008; Ritterfeld et al.; Song, Kim, Tenzek, & Lee; Zwiauer, 2000)•Promote exercise, improve user attitudes regarding physical activity, and help establish healthier daily physical activity patterns (Lin, Mamykina, Lindtner, Delajoux, & Strub, 2006)•Parental and peer involvement improved youth participant’s initial and sustained participation in exergame use (Paez, et al., 2009) www.gamesforhealth.org
    43. 43. Long-Term Effects•Little is known about the long-term behavior changes related to such use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Haddock et al., 2009; Mellecker & McManus, 2008)•Need for more in-depth analysis to investigate the long-term behavioral impacts of exergame use. (Biddiss & Irwin, 2010; Daley, 2009; Maloney et al., 2008; Martin et al., 2008; Ritterfeld et al.; Song, Kim, Tenzek, & Lee; Zwiauer, 2000)•Promote exercise, improve user attitudes regarding physical activity, and help establish healthier daily physical activity patterns (Lin, Mamykina, Lindtner, Delajoux, & Strub, 2006)•Parental and peer involvement improved youth participant’s initial and sustained participation in exergame use (Paez, et al., 2009) www.gamesforhealth.org
    44. 44. Academic Impacts www.gamesforhealth.org
    45. 45. Academic Impacts• Positive implications on academic achievement, absenteeism, negative classroom behaviors, physical activity levels and tardiness www.gamesforhealth.org
    46. 46. Academic Impacts• Positive implications on academic achievement, absenteeism, negative classroom behaviors, physical activity levels and tardiness ("The games in learning project," 2009; Hellmich, 2010; Shasek, 2009; Young, Marshak, Freier, & Medina, 2007) www.gamesforhealth.org
    47. 47. Academic Impacts• Positive implications on academic achievement, absenteeism, negative classroom behaviors, physical activity levels and tardiness ("The games in learning project," 2009; Hellmich, 2010; Shasek, 2009; Young, Marshak, Freier, & Medina, 2007)• Promoting physical fitness and increasing time in physical education can lead to improved grades and standardized test scores www.gamesforhealth.org
    48. 48. Academic Impacts• Positive implications on academic achievement, absenteeism, negative classroom behaviors, physical activity levels and tardiness ("The games in learning project," 2009; Hellmich, 2010; Shasek, 2009; Young, Marshak, Freier, & Medina, 2007)• Promoting physical fitness and increasing time in physical education can lead to improved grades and standardized test scores (Castelli, Hillman, Buck, & Erwin, 2007; Chomitz et al., 2009; Active Living Research, 2009), www.gamesforhealth.org
    49. 49. Academic Impacts• Positive implications on academic achievement, absenteeism, negative classroom behaviors, physical activity levels and tardiness ("The games in learning project," 2009; Hellmich, 2010; Shasek, 2009; Young, Marshak, Freier, & Medina, 2007)• Promoting physical fitness and increasing time in physical education can lead to improved grades and standardized test scores (Castelli, Hillman, Buck, & Erwin, 2007; Chomitz et al., 2009; Active Living Research, 2009),• Classroom-based physical activities have positive associations on academic behaviors, academic achievement (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2010), energy expenditure (Stewart, Dennison, Kohl, & Doyle, 2004) and on-task behavior (Mahar et al., 2006) www.gamesforhealth.org
    50. 50. www.gamesforhealth.org
    51. 51. We know games can help users get physical activity... www.gamesforhealth.org
    52. 52. how? why? We know games can help users get physical activity... with what kind of help? www.gamesforhealth.org
    53. 53. Need• Data-driven and original research• Impacts of social factors• Intervention design factors• Implementation guidelines• Game design recommendations www.gamesforhealth.org
    54. 54. Active Living Research (2009). Active education: Physical education, physical activity and academic performance (pp. 8). San Diego: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.Bailey, B. W., & McInnis, K. (2011). Energy cost of exergaming: A comparison of the energy cost of 6 forms of exergaming. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.15Barkley, J. E., & Penko, A. L. (2009). Physiologic responses, perceived exertion, and hedonics of playing a physical interactive video game relative to a sedentary alternativeand treadmill walking in adults. Journal of Exercise Physiology Online, 12(3). Bausch, L., Beran, J., Cahanes, S., & Krug, L. (2008). Physiological responses while playing nintendo wii sports. Journal of Undergraduate Kinesiology Research, 3(2), 19-25.Biddiss, E., & Irwin, J. (2010). Active video games to promote physical activity in children and youth: A systematic review. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine,164(7), 664. Bonetti, A., Drury, D., Danoff, J., & Miller, T. (2010). Comparison of acute exercise responses between conventional video gaming and isometric resistance exergaming.Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 24(7), 1799-1803. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181bab4a8.Castelli, D. M., Hillman, C. H., Buck, S. M., & Erwin, H. E. (2007). Physical fitness and academic achievement in third- and fifth-grade students. Journal of Sport & ExercisePsychology,, 29, 13. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). The association between school-based physical activity, including physical education, and academic performance.Atlanta, GA.Chan, P. A., & Rabinowitz, T. (2006). A cross-sectional analysis of video games and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms in adolescents. Ann Gen Psychiatry,5, 16.Chin A Paw, M., Jacobs, W.,Vaessen, E., Titze, S., & van Mechelen, W. (2008). The motivation of children to play an active video game. Journal of Science and Medicine inSport, 11(2), 163-166. Chomitz, V. R., Slining, M. M., McGowan, R. J., Mitchell, S. E., Dawson, G. F., & Hacker, K. A. (2009). Is there a relationship between physical fitness and academicachievement? Positive results from public school children in the northeastern united states. Journal of School Health, 79(1), 8.Coyne, S. M., Padilla-Walker, L. M., Stockdale, L., & Day, R. D. (2011). Game on. . . Girls: Associations between co-playing video games and adolescent behavioral and familyoutcomes. Journal of Adolescent Health. doi:10.1016/j.jadohealth.2010.11.249Daley, A. J. (2009). Can exergaming contribute to improving physical activity levels and health outcomes in children? Pediatrics, 124(2), 763-771. doi: 10.1542/peds.2008-2357Deutsch, J., Borbely, M., Filler, J., Huhn, K., & Guarrera-Bowlby, P. (2008). Use of a low-cost, commercially available gaming console (wii) for rehabilitation of anadolescent with cerebral palsy. Physical Therapy, 88(10), 1196-1207. doi: 10.2522/ptj.20080062 www.gamesforhealth.org
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    59. 59. Questions & Discussion Barbara Chamberlin, PhD bchamber@nmsu.edu Michelle Garza migarza@nmsu.eduThis project was supported by National Research Initiative Grant #2008-55215-18837 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. www.gamesforhealth.org
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