International students and libraries, maximising potential
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International students and libraries, maximising potential

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Talk given at UEL Jan 2011

Talk given at UEL Jan 2011

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    International students and libraries, maximising potential International students and libraries, maximising potential Presentation Transcript

    • International students and libraries: maximising potential Marie Scopes Leeds Metropolitan University Moira Bent Newcastle University
    • Definition: international students
      • “… we speak of international students when we mean students who have chosen to travel to another country for tertiary study … most of their previous experience will have been of other educational systems, in cultural contexts and sometimes in a language that is different from the one in which they will now study.”
      • (Carroll & Ryan, 2005)
    • Why now?
      • Competition
      • Globalisation
      • Economic crisis
      “ Success will go to those institutions and countries that are swift to adapt, slow to complain and open to change.” (Schleicher, 2007)
    • International student profile: world
      • Global demand for international student places:
        • 2003 – 2.1 million
        • 2020 – 5.8 million
      • USA, UK, Australia, New Zealand, Canada:
        • 2003 – 1 million
        • 2020 – 2.6 million
      • (Bohm et al., 2004)
    • International student profile: UK [Source: HESA Students in Higher Education Institutions 2007/08, 2008/09] Domicile 2007/08 2008/09 % change UK 1,964,310 2,027,085 3.2% Other EU 112,150 117,660 4.9% Non-EU 229,640 251,310 9.4% Total 2,306,105 2,396,050 3.9%
    • Source countries 2008/09
      • Top 5 non EU
      • China: 47,035
      • India: 34,065
      • USA: 14,380
      • Nigeria: 14,345
      • Malaysia: 12,695
      • Top 5 EU
      • Ireland: 15,360
      • Germany: 14,130
      • France: 13,090
      • Greece: 12,035
      • Cyprus: 1,0370
      [Source: HESA Students in Higher Education Institutions 2008/09]
    • Level of study
      • Students by domicile and level of study 2008/09
      [Source: HESA Students in Higher Education Institutions 2008/09] Domicile Postgraduate Undergraduate UK 353,430 1,673,650 Non UK 183,385 185,585
    • Top five subject areas [Source: HESA Students in Higher Education Institutions 2008/09] Subject International students nos. Percentage Business & administrative studies 101,715 31% Engineering & technology 46,055 31% Social studies 31,365 15% Computer science 22,190 23% Languages 21,265 16%
    • Top five recruiters [Source: HESA Students in Higher Education Institutions 2008/09] Institution International student nos Percentage Manchester 8,800 23% Nottingham 7,900 24% University College 7,125 34% Warwick 7,080 25% London School of Economics 6,555 68%
    • Market share
      • OECD 2008
      • USA 18.7%
      • UK 10%
      • Germany 7.3%
      • France 7.3%
      • Australia 6.9%
      • Canada 5.5%
    • Project group
      • Group
      • Karen Senior (Chair): University of Bolton
      • Moira Bent: Newcastle University
      • Marie Scopes: Leeds Metropolitan University
      • Mamtimyn Sunuodula: Durham University
      • Remit
      • Research methodology
        • Literature review
        • Online surveys - UK
        • Focus groups
        • Email lists / blogs
        • Personal visits
        • Library / University websites review
    • Impact of the research
      • “ SCONUL’s research has shown how the increasing number and diversity of international students can be a shot in the arm for university budgets, but the effects can be quite different for those who have to service their high expectations and complex needs. These guidelines should be welcomed by all vice chancellors in particular as they help our institutions to provide a world class service to our international students.”
      • Toby Bainton, Secretary of SCONUL
    • Research results
      • University International Strategy: 72% (36)
      • Library International Action plan : 8% (4)
      • Library web pages for international students: 8% (4)
      • Designated library staff for international students: 25.5% (13) – 79% less than 25% of job
      • Staff development training: 70% - 30% included learning styles
    • The SCONUL Guidelines
      • Exclusivity versus inclusivity
      • Strategies and policies
      • Practical solutions
      “ We need to concentrate on ensuring that we at all times give a quality experience to our students who come here.” Mary Stiasny
    • Managing Expectations
      • Information should be:
      • Clear
      • Accurate
      • Practical
      • Available
      • Key Concepts: 1, 2, 14
    • Staff Development
      • Cross-cultural awareness
      • Different pedagogies
      • Learning a language
      • Plain English guidelines
      • Diversity / international events
      • Key Concepts 3, 4, 7, 16, 17
    • Adapting Resources
      • Space
      • Social space
      • Access / opening hours
      • Special touches
      • Stock
      • Collection development policy
      • International perspective
      • International media
      • Key Concepts 1, 3, 15
    • Information Literacy
      • Teaching & learning styles
      • Learning habits
      • Learning attitudes
      • Flexibility and choice
        • Inductions
        • Subject based
        • One-to-one tutorials
        • Other support mechanisms
      • Key Concepts 6, 8, 11, 12, 13
    • International pedagogy
      • “ We need to explore whether there are innovative pedagogies (perhaps an international pedagogy) which is more appropriate to the needs of mixed groups of students including home as well as international students.”
      • Mary Stiasny
      • (Assistant Director, Institute of Education, Univ of London)
    • Publications
      • Plain English
      • Web pages – exclusivity > inclusivity
      • Material in different languages
        • Unique international profile
        • Staff / student involvement
      • Glossaries
      • Key Concepts 4, 5, 14, 15
    • Communication
      • Other University support services
      • Academic staff
      • Students
      • Other libraries
      • Key Concepts 4, 9, 10, 16
    • Strategy
      • Benchmarking
      • Written library strategy
      • Library university links
      • Views of international students
    • A few examples
      • http://www.dur.ac.uk/library/international/
      • http://www.library.bham.ac.uk/searching/infoskills/international_students.shtml
      • http://as.exeter.ac.uk/library/using/international/
      • http://www.uwe.ac.uk/library/info/international_students.htm
      • http://www.uel.ac.uk/lls/users/InternationalStudents.htm
    • SCONUL Guidelines: Library services for international students
      • Guidelines:
      • http://www.sconul.ac.uk/groups/access/ papers/international_students.pdf
      • References:
      • http://blogs.ncl.ac.uk/moira.bent click on Databases of references on left.
    • Questions [email_address] [email_address]