TED619 taking a stand project

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  • 1. Fall 2013 TED619 Project: TAKING A STAND
  • 2. Literacy, Instruction, & Leadership in the 21st Century During this course, we have examined three central course concepts – “Literacy as Situated Practice,” “Literacy in the Face of Deictic Technological and Social Trends,” and “Literacy Instruction and Leadership in Today’s Schools.” Our studies have included: • Critical Literacy • Culture of Poverty • Culturally Responsive Teaching & Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy • Deficit Thinking • • • • • Diversity Instruction Literacy Leadership Multiliteracies • • • • New Literacies Participatory Culture Social Identities Special Populations (e.g., English Language Learners, Students with
  • 3. Taking a Stand Project As we near the end of our time together, I ask you to put into practice what you have learning about literacy , instruction, and leadership in the 21st century. More specifically, I ask you to use what you have learned to effect change in your school (or district). As part of this project, you will be asked to engage in the same cycle of action-reflection-learning that is common to 21st century literacy teachers and leaders. On the following slides, full details of this project are provided.
  • 4. Overview Take a Stand Reflect Create Portfolio Step-by-Step
  • 5. Take a Stand Effecting Change in Today’s Schools
  • 6. The Goal of Contemporary Literacy & Content Area Literacy Instruction: Fostering the multiple literacies that are now recognized as foundational for personal and professional success in today’s world
  • 7. Read Choice Articles on BlackBoard Read. Think. Act. Use our coursework to effect change in your school. Find a need. Take action. Gather Evidence. NOTE: I am always available to help you think through this step. Call me any time. Identify Need & Act Gather Evidence of the Effects of Your Action
  • 8. Taking a Stand: Examples • Mentoring one teacher through his first use of VoiceThread in a social studies lesson • Accompanying a novice teacher on her first home visit and facilitating her post-visit reflection • Leading the grade level team in planning a scientific unit of study that uses Web 2.0 technology • Helping a student teacher to identify a set of culturallyrelevant texts to use in his upcoming solo lesson • Conducting “Book Club” lunchtime meetings for middle school students to discuss graphic novels • Arranging for a professional blogger to guest-lecture in classes on the subject of “writing” blogs for a career • Collaborating with the school librarian to reorganize part of the library into a “learning commons” space • Writing and submitting a grant for a class set of e-readers and assorted texts
  • 9. Gathering Evidence: Examples • Students’ / Teachers’ Comments • Circulation Figures for Books or “Hits” on Websites • Photographs of Redesigned / Improved Spaces • Video Clip of QuestionAnswer Period at End of Guest Lecture • Survey / Interview Responses • Students’ Work / Scores • Completed Lesson Plans / Units of Study • Project Logbook (daily entries detailing your own experiences and thoughts) • Audio Records or Transcripts of Book Club Discussions • Observation of Student Teacher’s Lesson
  • 10. Reflect Learning from Experience
  • 11. Reflecting On Experience & Learning What went really well during my “take a stand” activity? What were the strengths of my literacy leadership practice? What did not go as well or was challenging? What aspects of my literacy leadership practice might benefit from further development? If I were to “Take a Stand” again, what would I do differently? Why? What would I do the same? Why? Note: This step is intended to support your thinking. No formal products are expected, although notes of your thinking may prove useful as you create your portfolio. What did I learn about “Literacy as Situated Practice?” What did I learn about “21st Century Literacy Instruction?” What did I learn about “Literacy in the Face of Deictic Technological and Social Trends?” What did I learn about “21st Century Literacy Leadership?” Moving Forward: What will I do tomorrow, next week, next month, and so on as a result of this experience? How will I teach literacy in today’s schools in the future? How will I effect change in my school in the future?
  • 12. Create Portfolio Sharing Your Expertise
  • 13. For (1)Complex (2)Effecting Change the final product, you are asked to create a portfolio. (3)Participatory (4)IdentityMaking (5)Learning This portfolio showcases not only your Taking a Stand activity but also A Portfolio in 5 Sections your thinking learning. and
  • 14. Literacy is Complex Section Today, our understandings of literacy and text have broadened. We recognize that literacy is more than reading and writing printed text. It is “multiliteracies” and “texts.” Artifacts Rationale Provide 1 artifact that demonstrates how your Taking a Stand activity embodies this aspect of literacy. Provide a brief explanation to help us understand your thinking and learning. 1
  • 15. Literacy is Effecting Change Section 2 Today, we recognize that literacy is effecting change. Humans engage in literacy practices in order to effect change in their environments (or to accomplish other goals). Artifacts Rationale Provide 2 artifacts that demonstrate how your Taking a Stand activity embodies this aspect of literacy. Provide a brief explanation to help us understand your thinking and learning.
  • 16. Literacy is Participatory Section Today, we recognize that literacy is participatory. During literacy events, humans interact (e.g., respond, collaborate, persuade, teach) with other humans. It’s all about us! Artifacts Rationale Provide 2 artifacts that demonstrate how your Taking a Stand activity embodies this aspect of literacy. Provide a brief explanation to help us understand your thinking and learning. 3
  • 17. Literacy is Identity-Making Section Today, we recognize that literacy is identity-making: “the words and interactions being the tools we use to construct who we can be [and who others are] in this community” (Bomer & Bomer, 2001, p.23). Through our literacy practices, we create “possible identities” and “shared worlds.” Artifacts Rationale Provide 1 artifact that demonstrates how your Taking a Stand activity embodies this aspect of literacy. Provide a brief explanation to help us understand your thinking and learning. 4
  • 18. Literacy is Learning Section 5 Today, we recognize that literacy is constantly changing, and teachers’ definitions and practices must change to reflect our new understandings and practices. We must continuously revise our views of literacy and adjust our teaching foci, as well as use tools and instructional practices to prepare students for their futures. We must learn across our careers. Artifacts Rationale Provide 1 artifact that demonstrates how your Taking a Stand activity embodies this aspect of literacy. Provide a brief explanation to help us understand your thinking and learning.
  • 19. Artifact Artifacts are pieces of evidence that you have gathered. Examples include (but are not limited to) student work, summary report of survey results, lesson plan, and audio/video excerpts. Key Terms Rationale Rationales are brief explanations. They may be written or oral (audio- or video-taped). They may or may not include direct quotations of course-related materials. Taking a Stand Activity Activity refers to all of the work related to this project, such as your readings, actions, and reflection.
  • 20. Identity Identity refers to “self-understandings” or the ways in which people “tell themselves and then try to act as though they are who they say they are” (Holland et al., 1998, p. 3). It also implicates telling stories about other people (i.e., identity-making). Key Terms Thinking Thinking refers to the sense you are making of our course concepts and readings, your own ideas, and your ongoing questions or challenges. This will include paraphrases or direct quotations of courserelated materials. Learning Learning refers to the insights you’ve had about literacy and instruction in today’s schools, as well as about our course-related materials. The insights may embody new knowledge, deepened or broadened knowledge, or confirmation of existing knowledge.
  • 21. THE PROCESS » Select Your Media » Add Your Artifacts » Add Your Rationales » Add Scaffoldings and Navigational Aids (e.g., headings, subheadings, s ection dividers, paths, graphics) as needed » Ensure Access (for instructor and classmates) » Submit Portfolio (see next slide) • • • • Media Powerpoint or Prezi Presentation Word Document GoogleSite, Wiki, or Webpage LiveBinder, Dropr, or Silk Digital Portfolio Note: I am open to other media as well. If you have a different form that you would like to use, please contact me for approval before proceeding.
  • 22. SUBMIT IT » BlackBoard » Course Documents » “Submit Take a Stand Projects Here”
  • 23. ? How will my project be evaluated? Let’s Talk About It!
  • 24. This project is worth up to 68 points. Feedback Form I will use the criteria listed on the following slides to evaluate your work. Project feedback will consist of a “Feedback Form” with my judgments for each criterion, as well as qualitative comments.
  • 25. Completeness [4 points] • Uses an “approved” medium • Includes all “required” components – 5 sections = 7 artifacts, 7 rationales • Includes navigational aids and graphics that support readers/viewers’ comprehension • Includes a “cover” page or slide with orienting information (i.e., names of creators, project title, date, course name/number) • Includes a complete “References” [not “Works Cited”] section
  • 26. Taking a Stand Activity [10 points] • Shares enough information (through artifacts and rationales) to understand how course member(s) chose to “take a stand” • Is situated in the local school (or district) • Involves literacy/instruction in the 21st century • Is likely to improve local literacy instructional practices and/or climate/environment
  • 27. Artifacts [15 points] • Demonstrate how the Taking a Stand activity embodies the targeted aspect of literacy • Provide evidence of significant thinking and reflection about literacy/instruction/leadership in the 21st century – Demonstrate substantive understanding of course materials and concepts • Are comprehensible (e.g., highresolution, clear, and centered photographs)
  • 28. Rationales [30 points] • Are brief, concise • Explain how artifact reflects the targeted aspect of literacy • Help us to understand your thinking and learning • Provide evidence of significant thinking and reflection about literacy/instruction/leadership in the 21st century – Demonstrate substantive understanding of course materials and concepts – Include content from numerous course materials and course topics – Include sufficient detail
  • 29. Conventions [9 points] • Demonstrates thoughtful attention to audience (e.g., logical organization, precise use of language) • Strategically uses the affordances of the selected media to support communication • Error-free (i.e., conforms to all professional standards of written academic English) • Accurately and appropriately recognizes others’ work (i.e., citations and references)
  • 30. TIPS FOR SUCCESS Making the Most of the Project
  • 31. Be Systematic. • Do the activity and collect evidence. • Gather and review all evidence at once. • Review course readings, experiences, and materials. • Reflect. • Sort evidence into groups (that potentially correspond each porfolio section). • For each group, consider each “artifact” in light of the “artifact” evaluation criteria and select those that best fulfill the criteria. • Draft the rationales. Check rationales against the “rationales” evaluation criteria and make any needed revisions. • Create and “polish” the portfolio. Check against evaluation criteria, and finalize portfolio. Submit.
  • 32. Collaborate. • If already working with others: – Split the Taking a Stand activity and evidence gathering. – Work together to sort and select artifacts. – Talk over the rationales with each other. – Split the work of drafting the rationales and portfolio and checking/revising them per evaluation criteria. – Designate 1 person to submit portfolio (and ensure instructor and all classmates have access to portfolio). • Whether or not working with others: – Ask for colleagues to evaluate portfolio and provide feedback – Talk through thinking with colleagues – Send a section of the portfolio to instructor for formative feedback. – Ask someone to check for and correct errors in conventions.
  • 33. Be resourceful. • Schedule time to work. • Spread project out over time. • Seek support from others. – Google for tutorials or technical assistance. – Call instructor with questions or to talk over thinking. – Send one section to instructor for formative feedback. • Refer to this PowerPoint. – Offers guidance about what to include, how to organize project, and how project will be graded. Keep in mind that this project is designed to support the processing and application of course content. There are no tricks involved – projects which follow the directions in this presentation will receive full credit – and I am always available to help.
  • 34. Model  NOTE: This is the first time this project has been used in this course. Consequently, a completed example of this project is not available. However, other supports exist, such as (a) explicit directions [in this PPT], (b) instructor assistance [via phone, e-mail, or video conference], and (c) explicit evaluation criteria [in this PPT].
  • 35. In Conclusion… “All children arrive at school understanding and able to engage in only a subset of these literacy activities; school is meant to ensure that they all leave with a complete set.” (Valdes et al., 2005, p. 144)
  • 36. I care about you! Call or e-mail me with concerns, questions, suggesti on, and/or for help. 336-676-4250 nmmarti2@uncg.edu