State Policies that Facilitate  (or Inhibit) Expanding Education Options for Struggling Students and Out-of-School Youth N...
Focus on Education Finance <ul><li>State education funds represent one of the largest funding streams potentially availabl...
Focus on Education Finance <ul><li>NYEC has profiled: </li></ul><ul><li>Programs  and their strategies for tapping into fu...
3 Areas of Recommendation <ul><li>Allow education  funds to flow  to support students in programs both within and outside ...
I.  Funds follow student <ul><li>Ease the flow of state education funds to options that work. </li></ul><ul><li>States sho...
I.  Funds follow student <ul><li>Provide adequate funding to support education options. </li></ul><ul><li>States should en...
I.  Funds follow student <ul><li>Extend education funds to support high school completion for older youth. </li></ul><ul><...
II.  Additional funds <ul><li>Establish and fund statewide dropout prevention and recovery programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Sta...
II.  Additional funds <ul><li>Provide additional resources to schools and programs serving the hardest-to-serve students. ...
III. Flexible legislation <ul><li>Allow flexibility on key education programming issues. </li></ul><ul><li>States should a...
III. Flexible legislation <ul><li>Recognize the need for a variety of education options for a varied student population. <...
III. Flexible legislation <ul><li>Encourage collaboration beyond the public schools. </li></ul><ul><li>States should encou...
Punitive Policies <ul><li>States should carefully consider the effects of policies meant to discourage (or punish students...
The Opportunity <ul><li>Older youth issues and the dropout rate are getting unprecedented attention nationally. </li></ul>...
For more information visit  www.nyec.org Nancy Martin National Youth Employment Coalition 1836 Jefferson Place, NW Washing...
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State Policies To Expand Education Options Oct 2008

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Presentation for local and state leaders on expanding education options for struggling students and disconnected youth- NYEC Learning Exchange in Austin, TX, Oct. 2008

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State Policies To Expand Education Options Oct 2008

  1. 1. State Policies that Facilitate (or Inhibit) Expanding Education Options for Struggling Students and Out-of-School Youth NYEC Learning Exchange Austin, TX October 29, 2008
  2. 2. Focus on Education Finance <ul><li>State education funds represent one of the largest funding streams potentially available to support disconnected youth. </li></ul><ul><li>Our Research: NYEC has been investigating how alternative schools and programs access local and state education funding to reach struggling students and out-of-school youth. </li></ul><ul><li>Our Goal: To promote the establishment of sustainable funding streams to support a broader range of education options & pathways for disconnected youth. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Focus on Education Finance <ul><li>NYEC has profiled: </li></ul><ul><li>Programs and their strategies for tapping into funding streams </li></ul><ul><li>States and their education finance policies </li></ul>
  4. 4. 3 Areas of Recommendation <ul><li>Allow education funds to flow to support students in programs both within and outside of traditional public school settings </li></ul><ul><li>Provide additional education funds to support existing education options adequately and to encourage public school districts to expand options for secondary education </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure legislation is flexible enough to allow for a variety of educational approaches </li></ul>
  5. 5. I. Funds follow student <ul><li>Ease the flow of state education funds to options that work. </li></ul><ul><li>States should enable the development of more education options & increase resources available for these education pathways by facilitating the flow of state education funds to non-public school education providers. </li></ul><ul><li>Oregon example </li></ul>
  6. 6. I. Funds follow student <ul><li>Provide adequate funding to support education options. </li></ul><ul><li>States should ensure that adequate funding follows students in education programs outside of the public K-12 system. </li></ul><ul><li>Charter school finance policies </li></ul><ul><li>Contracting out for service provision while retaining a portion of per-pupil funds </li></ul>
  7. 7. I. Funds follow student <ul><li>Extend education funds to support high school completion for older youth. </li></ul><ul><li>States should make public education funding available to serve students until they obtain a diploma. </li></ul><ul><li>In MA no age limit </li></ul>
  8. 8. II. Additional funds <ul><li>Establish and fund statewide dropout prevention and recovery programs. </li></ul><ul><li>States should support statewide programs to increase graduation rates, including dropout prevention and dropout recovery programs. </li></ul>
  9. 9. II. Additional funds <ul><li>Provide additional resources to schools and programs serving the hardest-to-serve students. </li></ul><ul><li>States should consider instituting a weighted student formula in determining funds allocated to education options. </li></ul><ul><li>IN- Alternative Education Program Grants up to $750 per pupil </li></ul><ul><li>NC- Committee on Dropout Prevention Awarded $7M to 60 programs across the state in 2008. </li></ul>
  10. 10. III. Flexible legislation <ul><li>Allow flexibility on key education programming issues. </li></ul><ul><li>States should allow flexibility regarding regulations affecting education options programs’ eligibility for state education funds, such as scheduling, seat time, time to graduation, & curriculum. </li></ul>
  11. 11. III. Flexible legislation <ul><li>Recognize the need for a variety of education options for a varied student population. </li></ul><ul><li>States should support the development of a variety of education options for struggling students and out-of-school youth. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Accelerated Learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Credit Recovery </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>GED Prep </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Employment Preparation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Juvenile Justice Re-entry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Career & Technical Education </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Programs for Parenting Teens </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. III. Flexible legislation <ul><li>Encourage collaboration beyond the public schools. </li></ul><ul><li>States should encourage school districts to collaborate with other local youth-serving systems and community-based organizations to meet the needs of struggling students and out-of-school youth. </li></ul><ul><li>MA – Pathways to Success by 21 (P21) </li></ul>
  13. 13. Punitive Policies <ul><li>States should carefully consider the effects of policies meant to discourage (or punish students for) dropping out, such as: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Increased compulsory school age </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Driver’s license/learner’s permit privileges </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Work permit privileges </li></ul></ul></ul>
  14. 14. The Opportunity <ul><li>Older youth issues and the dropout rate are getting unprecedented attention nationally. </li></ul><ul><li>Many districts and states are involved in high school reform discussions. </li></ul><ul><li>Youth-serving systems are more receptive to collaboration. </li></ul><ul><li>Employers are demanding more skilled workers. </li></ul><ul><li>Workforce systems and municipal leaders are more interested in playing a key role in dropout recovery and re-engagement. </li></ul>
  15. 15. For more information visit www.nyec.org Nancy Martin National Youth Employment Coalition 1836 Jefferson Place, NW Washington, DC 20036 202-659-1064

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