The Culture of Greece
Presented by Group 1: Natasha Adams, Stephen
Battey, Jacob Bauer, Tiffany Catan and Traci Clevers
No...
Non-verbal Communication in Relation to
Greek Symbols
A Study of Non-verbal Messages
Understood Worldwide via Greek
Symbol...
The Greek Alphabet
• The Greek Alphabet lends itself to various elements of non-verbal
communication. For instance, the le...
The Scales of Justice
• A worldwide symbol representing justice is the Scales of Justice.
According to Barbara Swatt, refe...
The Olympic Flame and Torch
Perhaps one of the most famous non-verbal Greek
emblems is the Olympic Torch. The Olympics sta...
The Cadmus
The Greek cadmus is yet another symbol that can be
recognized via non-communication as a symbol of health
or he...
References and Works Cited page 1
Green, Jen. Myths of Ancient Greece
Austin, Texas: Steck-Vaughn Company, 2001.
Liddell a...
Nonverbal Communication and The
Music and Dance of Ancient Greece
By Tiffany Catan
Ancient Greek Music and Dance
• In Ancient Greece, music
and dance played an
important part in everyday
lives.
• These art...
Greek Music
• Music was, and still is today, used to
convey non verbal messages in
communication.
• Ancient Greeks believe...
Greek Dance
• Dance in the Greek culture has
a rich part of history. Dancing
was believed to be a sacred
gift from the god...
Folk Dances of Greece
Pidiktos
This dance mirrors the lives
of the Greek men who lived
in the rugged mountains.
The moveme...
The Role of Nonverbal
Communication
• The Greek culture has a rich history of music and dance. The role these arts
tie int...
Body Language in Greece
• Greeks nod their head up to say no (“Greek
Etiquette Tips”)
– A downward nod means yes (“Greek E...
Body Language in Greece
• Greeks do not kiss each other when first
meeting ("Body language in")
• When they already know e...
Body Language in Greece
• Waving with the palm out can be mistaken as
beckoning someone to them (Farrington-
Darby, 2010)
...
Body Language and Dance
• One should join in on Greek dancing (“Greek
Etiquette Tips”)
• In line dances, one should join a...
References
• Greek etiquette tips. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.vayama.com/etiquette/greece/
• Farrington-Darby, N. (...
By Natasha Adams
http://reference.findtarget.com/search/Hellenistic
%20religion/
Photo reference
The theology of the ancient Greek is based on the many gods and goddesses.
Some of the Gods and Goddesses are:
• Zeus -the...
Periods of Ancient Greek History
6000 - 3000 BCE
Neolithic Period: Small agricultural communities, possible worship of
fer...
The are many different religions in Greece. Each individual is free to
believe what they want. According to the Eurostat- ...
Dagtoglou, P.D. (1991). "Protection of Individual Rights" (in Greek). Constitutional Law —
Individual Rights — Volume I. A...
Images taken from http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Communication.htm
The most resent of the ancient methods was to utilize a set of torches. At each end of a battlefield a group of
messengers...
405 B.C.-The ancient Greeks
used polished shields or
mirrors to signal to each
other during battles. The
would signal usin...
{{
The idea behind the water hydraulic telegraph wasThe idea behind the water hydraulic telegraph was
quite simple. A torc...
References
http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Technology/AncientGreekTechnology028.
htm
http://www.connectedearth.com/galleries...
The main focus of this presentation was to
provide one with some of the most important
aspects of the Greek Culture.
The m...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Greece slideshow

3,379

Published on

Published in: Travel
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,379
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
39
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Greece slideshow

  1. 1. The Culture of Greece Presented by Group 1: Natasha Adams, Stephen Battey, Jacob Bauer, Tiffany Catan and Traci Clevers November 7, 2010
  2. 2. Non-verbal Communication in Relation to Greek Symbols A Study of Non-verbal Messages Understood Worldwide via Greek Symbolism presented by Traci Clevers Photo courtesy http://bibledecoded.blogspot.com/
  3. 3. The Greek Alphabet • The Greek Alphabet lends itself to various elements of non-verbal communication. For instance, the letter “A” represents a job well done. Just by seeing the letter A (Greek letter Alpha) one knows a good grade was obtained, whether it is labeling a homework assignment or an egg. Other interesting non-verbal communications involving the Greek alphabet include the Delta Airlines logo and the Pi mathematics symbol, which both partially contain elements of the Greek alphabet. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Jelte/Greek_Alphabet http://www.zazzle.com/great_job_a_sticker-217085688877392375 http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/glie/Greek_dict.php
  4. 4. The Scales of Justice • A worldwide symbol representing justice is the Scales of Justice. According to Barbara Swatt, reference intern at the University of Washington School of Law, this emblem is possibly of the origin of Greek goddess Themis. http://lib.law.Washington.edu/ref/themis.htm Photos courtesy http://words-of-power.blogspot.com/2007_04_01_archive.html http://www.cs.uni.edu/~wallingf/blog/archives/monthly/2005-12.html
  5. 5. The Olympic Flame and Torch Perhaps one of the most famous non-verbal Greek emblems is the Olympic Torch. The Olympics started in Greece over 2500 year ago. The tradition of the lighting of the Olympic flame started in Greece and is still recognized as a non-verbal symbol of the games and their symbolism of athleticism and comradery. (Green 2002, p. 45) Photos courtesy: http://www.Greece-map.net/Greek-flag.htm http://candle4tibet.ning.com/profile/PHILOXENIA
  6. 6. The Cadmus The Greek cadmus is yet another symbol that can be recognized via non-communication as a symbol of health or health services. It is easy to see how Greek symbols have affected the world and it’s communication. It would also assist in communicating with someone from Greece by recognizing and respecting this contribution to modern communication. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caduceus
  7. 7. References and Works Cited page 1 Green, Jen. Myths of Ancient Greece Austin, Texas: Steck-Vaughn Company, 2001. Liddell and Scott, Greek-English Lexicon; Stuart L. Tyson, "The Caduceus", The Scientific Monthly, 34.6, (1932:492- 98) p. 493. Retrieved from Wikipedia November 1, 2010 from website: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caduceus http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Jelte/Greek_Alphabet http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/glie/greek_dict.php http://www.zazzle.com/great_job_a_sticker-217085688877392375 http://orwhatyouwill.wordpress.com/2010/02/ http://lib.law.washington.edu/ref/themis.html http://www.cs.uni.edu/~wallingf/blog/archives/monthly/2005-12.html http://candle4tibet.ning.com/profile/PHILOXENIA Additional photos courtesy of the following websites: http://bibledecoded.blogspot.com/ http://www.greece-map.net/greek-flag.htm http://www.greece-map.net/greek-flag.htm http://words-of-power.blogspot.com/2007_04_01_archive.html
  8. 8. Nonverbal Communication and The Music and Dance of Ancient Greece By Tiffany Catan
  9. 9. Ancient Greek Music and Dance • In Ancient Greece, music and dance played an important part in everyday lives. • These arts were used not only in early theaters but also in social gatherings, funerals and religious festivals. • Through their music and dance they were able to pass down traditions in history through non verbal communication. http://www.helleniccomserve.com/musichistory.html
  10. 10. Greek Music • Music was, and still is today, used to convey non verbal messages in communication. • Ancient Greeks believed that the gift of music was given to them by the goddesses called the Nine Muses, in which the word music is derived from. • Ancient Greeks used music in religious ceremonies, funerals, social gatherings and theater. • In these situations the music would enhance the nonverbal message of the overall feeling of the gathering i.e fast paced, upbeat music may go hand in hand with a joyous, religious ceremony. *The 9 Muses are dancing while Apollo is playing the lyre. http://www.helleniccomserve.com/musichistory.html http://www.in2greece.com/english/historymyth/mythology/names/muses.htm
  11. 11. Greek Dance • Dance in the Greek culture has a rich part of history. Dancing was believed to be a sacred gift from the gods. • It has allowed the Ancient Greeks and modern Greeks to re-tell the history of their culture through non verbal kinesics. • Many dances of the ancient Greeks not only told a story through their movement, but also taught soldiers how to fight in wars. http://www.helleniccomserve.com/musichistory. html http://www.phantomranch.net/folkdanc/articles/g reek1_ak.htm
  12. 12. Folk Dances of Greece Pidiktos This dance mirrors the lives of the Greek men who lived in the rugged mountains. The movements of this dance include leaping and raising the legs to mimic how the men of this time lived their daily lives. This dance is very lively and is usually accompanied by jumping. Syrto This dance mirrors the lives of the Greeks that lived in the lowlands, near the seashores and Aegean Sea. These movements, which are performed more by women, are slow, peaceful and have flow. This is supposed to symbolize the flowing waves of the ocean. http://www.phantomranch.net/folkdanc/articles/greek1_ak.htm http://gogreece.about.com/od/musicdance/a/greekdancing.htm
  13. 13. The Role of Nonverbal Communication • The Greek culture has a rich history of music and dance. The role these arts tie into nonverbal communication is through the tone they set (music) and kinesics (dance). Through this combination the Greeks were able to “tell” a story without ever having to say a word. This was very important to Greeks of ancient times, before they could record information like we do now. In this way, they could use music and dance as way to pass down traditions and history, celebrate and tell stories.
  14. 14. Body Language in Greece • Greeks nod their head up to say no (“Greek Etiquette Tips”) – A downward nod means yes (“Greek Etiquette Tips”) • Looking away when talking to a greek person is considered very rude ("Body language in")
  15. 15. Body Language in Greece • Greeks do not kiss each other when first meeting ("Body language in") • When they already know each other they may greet each other with a kiss twice on the cheek ("Body language in") • Shaking hands is more formal ("Body language in") • One should also shake hands with children (“Greek Etiquette Tips”)
  16. 16. Body Language in Greece • Waving with the palm out can be mistaken as beckoning someone to them (Farrington- Darby, 2010) • People should not sit down before told when eating (“Greek Etiquette Tips”) • The OK sign is considered vulgar (“Greek Etiquette Tips”)
  17. 17. Body Language and Dance • One should join in on Greek dancing (“Greek Etiquette Tips”) • In line dances, one should join at the back if a beginner (“Greek Etiquette Tips”) • One should not worry about the steps if the dance is not considered a line dance (“Greek Etiquette Tips”)
  18. 18. References • Greek etiquette tips. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.vayama.com/etiquette/greece/ • Farrington-Darby, N. (2010, April 08). How to read greek body language. Retrieved from http://www.sunisle.co.uk/news/Greece/Holiday-Advice/How-to-read-Greek-body- language/000580 • Body language in greece. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/articles/article/Greece/Body-Language-in-Greece/532
  19. 19. By Natasha Adams http://reference.findtarget.com/search/Hellenistic %20religion/ Photo reference
  20. 20. The theology of the ancient Greek is based on the many gods and goddesses. Some of the Gods and Goddesses are: • Zeus -the supreme lord and sky father Hera –his wife -the marriage and fertility goddess Demeter -the earth mother Hestia -the virgin goddess of the hearth Hephaestus -the God of fire and the forge Hermes -the God of travelers Hades -the lord of the dead and underworld Poseidon -the lord of waters Aphrodite -the Goddess of love Ares -the God of war Athena -the virgin goddess of wisdom Apollo -God of light, poetry and music Artemis –his sister -Goddess of wildlife and later Goddess of moon *The Gods were believed to verbally communicate with the humans and even bare children with them. • The mythology of the Greek religion consisted of the gods and how they affected the humans on earth through non-verbal communication. Photo references http://www.allaboutreligion.org/origin-greek-orthodox-religion-faq.htm Poseidon, the god of the sea
  21. 21. Periods of Ancient Greek History 6000 - 3000 BCE Neolithic Period: Small agricultural communities, possible worship of fertility goddesses 3000 - 1500 BCE Minoan Period: Minoan culture on Crete, worship of Snake Goddess 2000 - 1700 BCE Middle Bronze Age: Invasions of Greek-speaking people into mainland Greece (Linea A script used) 1700 - 1100 BCE Late Bronze Age: Mycenaean culture develops on mainland Greece (Linear B script used). Troy sacked around 1250 BCE. 1100 - 850 BCE Greek Dark Age: Mycenaean civilization falls and citadels are burned by invaders, Greek settlements are created through the Aegean islands and Asia Minor 850 - 479 BCE Archaic / Geometric Period: Phoenician alphabet adopted, geometric patterns dominate on pottery, kouros statues created. Classical Greek city-states begin to form. First Olympic Games: 776 BCE 480 - 323 BCE High Classical Period: After the defeat of the Persians, Greek city- states flourish but are eventually conquered by Alexander of Macedon 323 - 146 BCE Hellenistic Period: Greek civilization, carried throughout the Middle East by Alexander the Great, deeply influences native cultures - especially Roman myth, literature, and philosophy. 146 BCE - Roman Period: Rome sacks Corinth in 146 BCE and Greece becomes a Roman province. Greeks lose their independence, but have an even greater influence on literature, religion, and philosophy
  22. 22. The are many different religions in Greece. Each individual is free to believe what they want. According to the Eurostat- Eurobarometer poll of 2005, 81% believe in God. Also, 15.8% of Greeks describe their self as being very religious. *Below is a estimated amount of followers of each of the many religions in Greece. o Greek Orthodox is the biggest and most followed religion in Greece. It has 97% of the population as followers. o Old Calendrists (Greek Orthodox) have 500,000 followers o Muslims have 200,00 to 300,000 followers. o Roman Catholic have 50,000 followers o Protestants & Greek Evangelical Church have 30,000 followers o Assemblies of God, International Church of Foursquare Gospel & any other Pentecostal have 12,000 followers. o Jehovah's Witnesses have 28,243 followers. o Mormons have 653 followers.
  23. 23. Dagtoglou, P.D. (1991). "Protection of Individual Rights" (in Greek). Constitutional Law — Individual Rights — Volume I. Athens-Komotini: Ant. N. Sakkoulas Publishers. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greece Mavrias, Kostas G. (2002) (in Greek). Constitutional Law. Athens: Ant. N. Sakkoulas Publishers. translated by Xenophon Paparrigopoulos, Stavroula Vassilouni (2004) (PDF). The Constitution of Greece. Athens: Hellenic Parliament. Websites: http://www.Theologywebsite.com http://www.clearleadinc.com/site/greek-religion.html
  24. 24. Images taken from http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Communication.htm
  25. 25. The most resent of the ancient methods was to utilize a set of torches. At each end of a battlefield a group of messengers would stand by with 5 torches that had 5 characters on it. They would utilize a specific sequence that would effectively communicate a message at long distant. http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Communication.htm Picture taken from http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Communication.htm
  26. 26. 405 B.C.-The ancient Greeks used polished shields or mirrors to signal to each other during battles. The would signal using pre- planned patterns of flashes. http://www.india-karnataka.info/Heliograph Image taken from http://www.bible-history.com/sketches/ancient/bronze-mirrors.html Image taken from http://www.xiongdudu.com/image/Greek_Battle_Shields
  27. 27. {{ The idea behind the water hydraulic telegraph wasThe idea behind the water hydraulic telegraph was quite simple. A torch held high signaled the start ofquite simple. A torch held high signaled the start of the message. At the start both sides would remove athe message. At the start both sides would remove a cork at the bottom of the jar allowing water to draincork at the bottom of the jar allowing water to drain out. As the water level lowered so did a stick that wasout. As the water level lowered so did a stick that was floating in it. This stick had a message written at thefloating in it. This stick had a message written at the same intervals. As the water level receded eachsame intervals. As the water level receded each member would continue to observe the torch at themember would continue to observe the torch at the other end until the light was lowered. At this point theother end until the light was lowered. At this point the cork would be replace and the message on the stickcork would be replace and the message on the stick would be read by looking at the wording that was stillwould be read by looking at the wording that was still visible.visible. http://www.connectedearth.com/galleries/Telecomhttp://www.connectedearth.com/galleries/Telecom municationsage/Thetelegraph/Firststeps/index.htmmunicationsage/Thetelegraph/Firststeps/index.htm Image taken from http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Technology/AncientGreekTechnology028.html
  28. 28. References http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Technology/AncientGreekTechnology028. htm http://www.connectedearth.com/galleries/Telecommunicationsage/Thetele graph/Firststeps/index.htm http://www.india-karnataka.info/Heliograph http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Communication.htm
  29. 29. The main focus of this presentation was to provide one with some of the most important aspects of the Greek Culture. The main points of the Greek culture that our group discussed are: Greek Symbols – Traci Clevers Music & Dance – Tiffany Catan Body Language – Stephen Battey Religion – Natasha Adams Ancient Forms of Non-Verbal Communication – Jacob Bauer Photo Reference: www.ancientgreece.com/gallery/
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×