• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content

Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

Like this presentation? Why not share!

Neil J. Long Design Portfolio

on

  • 1,021 views

A selection of works completed while earning my Master of Architecture.

A selection of works completed while earning my Master of Architecture.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,021
Views on SlideShare
956
Embed Views
65

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
8
Comments
1

3 Embeds 65

http://www.slideshare.net 46
http://www.linkedin.com 18
https://www.linkedin.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

11 of 1 previous next

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Enviable portfolio, dynamic layout. Bravo!
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Neil J. Long Design Portfolio Neil J. Long Design Portfolio Presentation Transcript

    • neil j. long graduate design portfolio
    • neil j. long neil j. long neil j. long U ND E R G R ADU AT E E DUC AT IO N U ND E R G R ADU AT E E DUC AT IO N G RADUATE EDUC AT IO N G RADUATE EDUC AT IO N U ND E R G R ADU AT E E DUC AT IO N University of Florida School of Architecture - Gainesville, FL - Master oflong neil j. Architecture, 2010 G RADUATE EDUC AT IO N Elmhurst College - Elmhurst, IL - Bachelor of Arts Cum Laude, 2005 Elmhurst College - Elmhurst, IL - Bachelor of Arts Cum Laude, 2005 University of Florida School of Architecture - Gainesville, FL - Master of Architecture, 2010 ElmhurstLiterature & Music Majors; Philosophy Minor Laude, 2005 College - Elmhurst, IL - Bachelor of Arts Cum English Literature & Music Majors; Philosophy Minor University of Florida English Literature & Music Majors; Philosophy Minor English Honors & Activities School of Architecture - Gainesville, FL - Master of Architecture, 2010 Honors & Activities AT IO N G RADUATE EDUC Honors & Activities Honors & Activities Honors & Activities Honors & Activities  Joh n W. Stovall Scholarsh ip Awarded 2009 University of Florida School of Architecture - Gainesville, FL - Master of Architecture, 2010  Joh n W. Stovall Scholarsh ip Awarded 2009   O tisnA. Skin ner Scholarshi p Award 2008 Joh W. Stovall Scholarsh ip Awarded 2009 O tis A. Skin ner Scholarshi p Award 2008  Omicron Delta Kap pa, National Leadership Honor Society Honors Ar th u r Blen n An derson Scholarship Award 2007 & Activities  Omicron Delta Kap pa, National Leadership Honor Society   OmicronSigma Psi Recogn i tion Society (Music Honor Society) Lambda Delta Kap pa, National Leadership Honor Society  Artis u r Blenner Scholarshi p Award 2008 O th A. Skin n An derson Scholarship Award 2007  Lambda Sigma Psi Recogn i tion Society (Music Honor Society)  Lambda Sigma Psi Recogn i tion En glish Honor Society Society) Sigma Tau Delta, In ternational Society (Music Honor  Puthlication n An derson Scholarship Award 2007 u dent d esign retrospective 2008/2009 Pu bn W. Stovall Scholarsh ip Awardedof Florida st u dent d esign retrospective 2008/2009 Ar b u r Blen in Arch i trave, Un iversity 2009  Sigma Tau Delta, In ternational En glish Honor Society  Joh lication in Arch i trave, Un iversity of Florida st  Sigma Tau Delta, In ternational Sprin g 2001, Fall 1999 Dean’s List Fall 2003, Fall 2002, En glish Honor Society Stu den t Liaison for ithe School of Architecture Stu d io Cu esign Committee 2008/2009  Dean’s List Fall 2003, Fall 2002, Sprin g 2001, Fall 1999    Stu den tSkin in Scholarshi p Award 2008Florida st u dent d lt u re retrospective 2008/2009 O tislicationner Arch the School of Architecture Stu d io Cu lt u re Committee 2008/2009 Pu b A. Liaison for trave, Un iversity of   Dean’st ListdFall 2003, Fall Dyer En dowed Scholarship Awar d 2003/2004 Rober an Gou d yloch 2002, Sprin g 2001, Fall 1999  Rober t an d Gou d yloch Dyer En dowed Scholarship Awar d 2003/2004 Grad uate Teach in g the School ofTheory I 2009 Stu d io Cu lt u re Committee 2008/2009 Rober trst College yloch Dyer EnSch olarshi p 1 99 9/2000 d 2003/2004 E lmh u an d Gou d Music Talen t dowed Scholarship Awar Gradu r t Liaison in g Assistan t for Theory I 2009    Ar th uate Teach for Assistan t for Architecture Stu den Blen n An derson Scholarship Award 2007  E lmh u rst College Music Talen t Sch olarshi p 1 99 9/2000 Teach in g Assistan t for Designfor& 2 2007/2008  E lmh u rstl CollegeEMusic b l e Guitarist (Performance/Studio Recording) 2000/2001; 2002/2003 C l ass ica G u i t a r n sem Talen t Sch olarshi p 1 99 9/2000   Grad uate Teach in g trave, Un 1 Theory I 2009 Pu b lication in Arch iAssistan t 1 & 2 2007/2008 Teach in g Assistan t for Designiversity of Florida st u dent d esign retrospective 2008/2009  C l ass ica l G u i t a r E n sem b l e Guitarist (Performance/Studio Recording) 2000/2001; 2002/2003  C l ass ica l G u i t a r E n sem b l e GuitaristPublicity and Concert Recording) 2000/2001; 2002/2003 Head of (Performance/Studio Sales 2002/2003 Project leader for tthe ann ual design2007/2008 C l ass ica l G u i t a r E n sem b l e Head of Publicity and Concert Sales 2002/2003 Project g Assistan for Design 1of Architecture Stu d of a Sukkah for Hillel at the University of Florida 2008 Teach in Liaison for the School & 2 & constr uction of a lt u re Committee 2008/2009     Stu den t leader for the ann ual design & constr uctionio CuSukkah for Hillel at the University of Florida 2008  C l ass ica l C o ntc e rE n semib l e Head of Publicity and Concert Sales 2002/2003 o l l e g e G u i a r t C h o r Secon d Tenor 1999/2000; 2000/2001 Choir Board Member 2000/2001 Par tici pa tion in the AIA Florida Healthcare for the Homeless Design Hillel at te 2008  C o l l e g e C o n c e r t C h o i r Secon d Tenor 1999/2000; 2000/2001 Choir Board Member 2000/2001   Par tici pa tion in in g Assistan t forHealthcare for the Homeless Design Charret te 2008 Project leader for the ann ual design & constr uction of a Sukkah for Charret the University of Florida 2008 Grad uate Teach the AIA Florida Theory I 2009   C o l l e g e C o n c e r t C h o i r Secont Bl ues” Guitarist (Performance/Studio Recording) 2000/2001 Vocal Jazz E n semble “Late Ni g h d Tenor 1999/2000; 2000/2001 Choir Board Member 2000/2001 Vocal Jazz E n semble “Late Ni g h t Bl ues” Guitarist (Performance/Studio Recording) 2000/2001  J a z z G u i t a r n semble l“Late Ni g h t(Performance/Studio Recording) 2000/2001 Vocal Jazz E E n s em b e Guitarist Bl ues” Guitarist (Performance/Studio Recording) 2000/2001 Proficientin gtion in theforRhinoceros 2007/2008 the Homeless Design Charret te 2008   Teach pa AutoCAD, Design 1 Healthcare for Par tici in Assistan t AIA Florida & 2 with Grasshopper, 3ds Max, SketchUp, Adobe Proficient in AutoCAD, Rhinoceros with Grasshopper, 3ds Max, SketchUp, Adobe Photoshop/Illustrator/InDesign Photoshop/Illustrator/InDesign   J a z z G u i t a r E n s em b l e Guitarist (Performance/Studio Recording) 2000/2001 J a z z G u i m b o n s em b l e (Performance) 1999/2000; 2000/2001 z z C o t a r E Guitarist Guitarist (Performance/Studio Recording) 2000/2001  J a z z C o m b o Guitarist (Performance) 1999/2000; 2000/2001 Proficient in AutoCAD, Form-Z, ParaCloud, Revit & Ecotect Analysis at the UniversityPhotoshop/Illustrator/InDesign  Project leader for the Rhinoceros with Grasshopper,Sukkah for Hillel ann ual design & constr uction of a 3ds Max, SketchUp, Adobe of Florida 2008 Project experience in Form-Z, ParaCloud, Revit & Ecotect Analysis   J a z z u rs tm b oleGuitarist (Performance) 1999/2000; 2000/20012000/2001 E lm h C o Co l ge Jazz Fest i v a l Publicity Team 1999/2000; E lm h u rs t Co l le ge Jazz Fest i v a l Publicity Team 1999/2000; 2000/2001 Project tici pa tion in the AIA Florida Healthcare for the Homeless Design Charret te 2008  Par experience in  E lm h u rs t Co llle ge JazzaFest Cast Publicity 1999/2000 lm r s C o l e g e T h e t e r i v a l Member Team 1999/2000; 2000/2001  E l m h u r s t C o l l e g e T h e a t e r Cast Member 1999/2000 Project experience in Form-Z, ParaCloud, Revit & Ecotect Analysis   E lm h u rs tt Col lle ge M usic tDepa r tmen t Boar d Freshman Representative 1999/2000 lm r s C o l e g e T h e a e r Cast Member 1999/2000 E lm h u rs t Col le ge M usic Depa r tmen t Boar d Freshman Representative 1999/2000 Proficient in AutoCAD, Rhinoceros with Grasshopper, 3ds Max, SketchUp, Adobe Photoshop/Illustrator/InDesign   E lm h u rsder ( E lm h u rs t Co l le ge tmen t n t newspa pe r) St aff Wr i te r 2002/2003; S ummer 2003 T he Lea t Col le ge M usic Depa r st u de Boar d Freshman Representative 1999/2000  T he Lea der ( E lm h u rs t Co l le ge st u de n t newspa pe r) St aff Wr i te r 2002/2003; S ummer 2003  T he tLea der o E lm hiuirs t Co l n feren ce Wor ks ho p ope r) St affi rWr i te r n2002/2003; S ummeru2003 So u h am p t ( n W r t n g Co le ge st u de n t newspa n Memo Wr i t i g w i t h F r a n k McCo r t S ummer 2003 G RADUAT E STUDI E S ABRO AD ParaCloud, Revit & Ecotect Analysis Project experience in Form-Z,  So u t h am p t o n W r i t i n g Co n feren ce Wor ks ho p o n Memo i r Wr i t i n g w i t h F r a n k McCo u r t S ummer 2003 G RADUAT E STUDI E S ABRO AD   So u t h am p t o for p i t i n r y Co n ferenp t uWorn M i d d lenWe s te r nr Vo icen li te ra r y F r a n k McCo u r t S ummer 2003 P u b l ica t i o n n W r oe t g a n d sc u l ce re i ks ho p o Memo i Wr i t i g w i t h ma g az i ne 2003 P u b l ica t i o n for p oe t r y a n d sc u l p t u re i n M i d d le We s te r n Vo ice li te ra r y ma g az i ne 2003 G RADUAT E STUDI E S ABRO AD  P u b r icattiio n afor l p oeMem ber sc u l p t u re i n M i d d le We s te r n Vo ice li te ra r y ma g az i ne 2003 I n te l n a o n l C u b t r y a n d 2002/2003  I n te r n a t i o n a l C l u b Mem ber 2002/2003 Vicenza, Italy Fall 2009 Vicenza, Italy Fall 2009  I n te r n a t i o n a l C l u b Mem ber 2002/2003 • University of Florida Vicenza Instit u te of Architecture Vicenza, Italy Fall 2009 Vicenza Instit u te of Italian conversation & grammar • University of Florida Architecture U N D E R G R A D U AT E S T U D I E S A B R O A D G RADUAT E STUDI E futurism & AD u te of Italian conversation & grammar • • • Seminars: Italian S ABRO rational ism; Seminars: Italian futurism & rational ism; Architecture University of Florida Vicenza Instit U N D E R G R A D U AT E S T U D I E S A B R O A D U N D E R G R A D U AT E S T U D I E S A B R O A D • Stud io: Relocation of the Vicenza Publ ic Library withi n a deteriorated Renaissance garden • • Stud io: Relocation of the & rational ism;ic Library withi n a deteriorated Renaissance garden Seminars: Italian futurism Vicenza Publ Italian conversation & grammar Vicenza, Italy Fall 2009 of the Vicenza Publ Oxford, England Spring 2004 Oxford, England Spring 2004 Guadalajara, Mexico Summer 2008 ic Library withi n a deteriorated Renaissance garden • Stud io: Relocation Guadalajara, Mexico Summer 2008 te of Architecture Oxford, Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Keble College, University of Oxford • England Spring 2004 • • University of Florida P reservation Institu te University of Florida Vicenza Instit u • Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Keble College, University of Oxford Guadalajara, Mexico futurism & place in ism; teareas, conversation at ten t ion to t he use of water & the colonial • • • Summer 2008 University of Florida P reservation Institu Seminars:New strategies of rational ruralItalian with special & grammar Seminar: Italian hacienda system • • Centre forShakespeare / Greek Tragedy / European Renaissance Art & Archi tecture Tu t orials: Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Keble College, University of Oxford Tu t orials: Shakespeare / Greek Tragedy / European Renaissance Art & Archi tecture • Seminar: New strategies of place in rural areas, with special at ten t ion to t he use of water & the colonial hacienda system • Tu t orials: Shakespeare / Greek Tragedy / European Renaissance Art & Archi tecture • • • Stud io: Civic Floridaof reservation Institu teLibrary withi n n de las Cañas, a rural Ejido garden in the Tequila Valley University of buil dinP the Vicenza Publ ic in San Martí a deteriorated Renaissance village Studio: Relocation g & publ ic promenade Nijmegen, The Netherlands Fall 2003 • • Studio: Civic strategies publ ic promenade in San Martí n de las Cañas, a t he Ejido village the colonial Valley Seminar: Newbuil din g & of place in rural areas, with special at ten t ion to ruraluse of water & in the Tequilahacienda system Nijmegen, The Netherlands Fall 2003 Nijmegen, The Universiteit Nijmegen 2003 • Radboud Netherlands Fall Guadalajara, Summer 2007 ic promenade in San Martí n de las Cañas, a rural Ejido village in the Tequila Valley Paris, Franc e Mexico Summer 2008 • Studio: Civic buil din g & publ Paris, Franc e Summer 2007 • • Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen RadboudAmerican Litera t ure / Race & Gender in American P op-Cul t u re / In terna tio nal Law Stu d ies: Universiteit Nijmegen • University of Florida P reservation Institu te Florida Research Center, Paris • Stu d ies: American Litera t ure / Race & Gender in American P op-Cul t u re / In terna tio nal Law Paris, Seminar: The Florida ResearchParis: Experimentswith special at ten t ion to t he use of water & the colonial hacienda system University of • Franc e Summer 2007 Center, Paris • Stu d ies: American Litera t ure / Race & Gender in American P op-Cul t u re / In terna tio nal Law • NewArchitecture of strategies of place in rural areas, in Place Milan, Italy Fall 2001 & Spring 2002 • • Seminar: The Florida ResearchParis: Experiments in Place Architecture of Center, Paris University of buil din g & publ ic promenade in San Martí n de las Cañas, a rural Ejido village in the Tequila Valley Milan, Italy Fall 2001 & Spring 2002 • Studio: Civic Seminar: The Architecture of Paris: Experiments in Place Milan, Italy Fall 2001 & Spring 2002 • Institu te of European Studies • • Institu te of European Studies • Institu te ofCattol ica, Studies: Italian conversation & grammar Università European Studies Paris, Franc e Summer 2007 • Università Cattol ica, Studies: Italian conversation & grammar • Università Cattol ica,ionale Della Musica, Stu dies: & grammar tar; Music History / Theory Accademia In ternaz Studies: Italian conversation Classical Gui • University of Florida Research Center, Paris • Accademia In ternaz ionale Della Musica, Stu dies: Classical Gui tar; Music History / Theory • Accademia In ternaz ionale Della Musica, Stu dies: Classical Gui tar; Music History / Theory • Seminar: The Architecture of Paris: Experiments in Place Montego Bay, Jamaica January 2000 & January 2001 Montego Bay, Jamaica January 2000 & January 2001 Montego Bay, Jamaica January 2000 & January 2001 • Elmhurst College “Educational Ex periences in Jamaica” teaching music to underprivileged middle school chil dren • Elmhurst College “Educational Ex periences in Jamaica” teaching music to underprivileged middle school chil dren • Elmhurst College “Educational Ex periences in Jamaica” teaching music to underprivileged middle school chil dren
    • 05 21 31 47 agua y ladrillo | community center oasis | urban pavilion lanterns | spanish history museum skin | facade project selected projects
    • agua y ladrillo advanced studio summer 2008 program: community center location: san martín de las cañas computer modeling: SketchUp rendering: Podium
    • san martín de las cañas Centrally located in the state of Jalisco, Mexico, San Martín de las Cañas is a small village of 780 original inhabitants situated within the Tequila Valley 3,600 hacienda feet above sea level. A rural landscape of blue agave farming and tequila production surrounds the agrarian village. Operated as a traditional dam hacienda up until the agrarian land reform of the Mexican Revolution (1910), San Martín is now site within the jurisdiction of an Ejido, a region of land bull ring governed and farmed communally and supported by the state. Built into a hillside, San Martín de las Cañas has adapted to the naturally steep grade of the terrain. With the exception of the old hacienda town square, nothing commits to an orthogonal geometry – no road is even remotely flat. The city has grown organically from a man-made reservoir along a river, forming an enclave of ad hoc houses and roads that become part of the landscape itself. | 07 | neil j. long neil j. long | 08 |
    • agua | water Every village throughout the arid Tequila Valley has a unique relationship with water. The most vital of all resources, water is at times also the most scarce. High above the valley floor, San Martin is advantageously positioned near some of the highest cascades in Mexico, allowing it to harness water for both power and drinking. In fact, narrow aqueducts (both above ground and embedded into the streets) carry water through the village to a dammed reservoir, which is also fed by the San Martin River. The townspeople routinely construct makeshift dams of their own along these aqueducts to create personal water supply for laundry or other household needs. 10ft 30ft 50ft 100ft 200ft | 09 | neil j. long neil j. long | 10 |
    • Particularly undeveloped, the site at the north side of the community reservoir offered a unique opportunity to expand the free public plaza center public space of the town through a multi-use community center. The site was little more than a discordant intersection of winding roads, water and landfill. It was the leftover space of several intersecting axes and geometries that were never intended to find resolution. Interestingly, the site provided a prototypical example of what Eduard Bru coined the “urban void”. While San Martín is far from the scale of the mega cities Bru refers to in his Untried Territories, this was still the type of “conflictive space” that forces the architect or urban planner to invent new places and new uses. By expanding the reservoir embankment in the direction of the water, the north shore of the reservoir is transformed into a functioning public plaza and promenade. At the intersection of the plaza and sketches from initial visit map promenade, a new community center is created. intersection of site lines | 11 | neil j. long neil j. long | 12 |
    • ladrillo | brick As the soil is rich in clay there is an abundance of brick makers scattered throughout the Tequila Valley. The design of the community center incorporated the typical concrete frame with brick inlays that pervades the architecture of the region. Not only did it make good design sense to utilize local materials and methods, it also created an inherent connection between the architecture and the landscape in terms of both the natural and fabricated environments. | 13 | neil j. long neil j. long | 14 |
    • 1 - ejido room 2 - event space 3 - kitchen 2 2 3 2 1 event space programmable space By providing open event spaces as well as private rooms of varying sizes, the community center can host a wide variety of social events throughout the year. It also provides much needed accommodations for overnight guests for bull fights, carnivals and regional meetings of the Ejido. For this reason, the center is divided into two wings, each with two levels and separate entrances, to allow for multiple events at the same time. 10ft 15ft 25ft 50ft ejido room entrance | 15 | neil j. long neil j. long | 16 |
    • ejido room & laundry San Martin benefits from a semi-arid climate and a relatively high elevation, causing little variation in temperature year-round. This allowed the main gathering spaces of the community center to remain open, with uninhibited views of the surrounding landscape. The largest space was designed to accommodate governmental meetings of the Ejido. The porosity of the tilt-up concrete wall to the south regulates the wind and sun entering the Ejido room and offers privacy while still engaging with the adjacent plaza. The room’s massive, cantilevered roof provides shading while also collecting rain water. Folded metal panels, which form the ceiling of the Ejido room, act as channels to carry water to the laundry below. rain water collection | 17 | neil j. long neil j. long | 18 |
    • public pavilions water terraces water pavilions Several small pavilions and terraced platforms were designed to occupy new landfill along the reservoir embarkment, offering highly programmable public space for local residents and vendors. This provides a venue for the regular markets, which are held in the village. Likewise, the shade offered by the pavilions and the coolness of the water will most certainly draw more people to the reservoir in the hot summer months. In the rainy season when the reservoir is high, parts of the terraced platforms will be partly submerged, providing a visual reminder of the passage of seasons. | 19 | neil j. long neil j. long | 20 |
    • urban oasis advanced studio fall 2008 program: pavilion location: St. Augustine, FL computer modeling: 3ds Max rendering: V-Ray
    • urban oasis The recent remaking of St. Augustine into a “living history museum” produced an unfortunate consequence; a once vibrant fort community of artists (especially street artists) became alienated from any kind of free public exhibition. The city council went so far as to issue a ban on all public art within fifty feet of the tourist-saturated St. George Street. This project repurposes a parking lot located in the historic town center, at the intersection of Cordova and Carrera Streets, into a free public forum or a place of refuge (an oasis) within the city. The grassy oasis is designed to provide a series of small, programmable urban “room-like” spaces for visiting artists or weary pedestrians looking for peace and solitude. site Cordova Street St. George Street historic restoration | 23 | neil j. long neil j. long | 24 |
    • By utilizing a series of traditional Coquina walls, the Historic Grace United Methodist Church 1886 space is defined primarily by movement. The seemingly indeterminate arrangement of planar surfaces produces a sequence of parallaxes, which are continually redefined as one progresses through the oasis. The visual porosity (or the physical depth of the field) fluctuates without anticipation as one moves in any direction. From the exterior, one TREET is given fragmented views of what lies inside; from the ERA S CARR interior, one is never without a glimpse of the city beyond COR the sanctuary of the walls. By contrast, the canopy is quite DOV regular, housed within a symmetrical space frame; yet, it A ST too destabilizes any singular reading of the field below REE T with glass and mirrored panels of varying translucency that cast an array of shadows in fleeting patterns. The mirroring section visually bridges the otherwise disconnected spaces, creating something of a virtual parallax. T REE A ST ENCI VAL angled mirrors in canopy reflect underlying spaces Ponce de León Hall at Flagler College 1888 | 25 | neil j. long neil j. long | 26 |
    • a passing glimpse patterns & parallax | 27 | neil j. long neil j. long | 28 |
    • A new corridor linking Grace United Methodist Church and Flagler College 5ft 15ft 25ft remembering the wall conforms to the modern city grid on one edge while the other edge is rotated to follow the path of a now buried 16th century Spanish wall - a subtle reminder of the layers of history beneath St. Augustine. | 29 | neil j. long neil j. long | 30 |
    • lanterns advanced studio fall 2008 program: Spanish History Museum location: St. Augustine computer modeling: 3ds Max rendering: V-Ray
    • It is impossible to break ground in St. Augustine without uncovering some evidence of its remarkable history, especially from the Spanish colonial years. Therefore, it seemed appropriate to house the proposed Spanish History Museum within the earth beneath an artificial embankment rising from the edge of the adjoining glacis of Castillo de San Marcos, located on the waterfront just across historic Highway A1A. Unlike its 17th century neighbor, the museum’s glacis was designed not to impede the advancement of unwanted guests, but instead to allow access from every possible approach. The museum glacis, in contrast to the typically flat Florida coastline, rises just high enough to provide panoramic views of Castillo de San Marcos and the St. Augustine Marina while respecting the local height ordinances of the Spanish Quarter. Located beneath a scenic promenade, the Museum’s primary exhibition space is oriented toward Castillo de San Marcos as a constant reminder of its historical presence. | 33 | neil j. long neil j. long | 34 |
    • Castillo de San Marcos pedestrian corridor Highway A1A reconfigured to provide museum frontage road accessible only to public transportation historic St. George Street Highway A1A with new frontage road | 35 | neil j. long neil j. long | 36 |
    • 1 - exhibition hall 2 - event space 3 - archives 4 - gift shop 5 - courtyard 1 lobby with lightwell 1 4 2 5 3 5 5ft 15ft 25ft 50ft 100ft pedestrian corridor links St. George Street and Highway A1A | 37 | neil j. long neil j. long | 38 |
    • 5 - courtyard 6 - exterior passage 7 - administration 8 - cafe & patio 9 - kitchen exhibition hall 8 9 6 5 7 5ft 15ft 25ft 50ft 100ft facade minimizes light pollution - mitigating harm to coastal wildlife | 39 | neil j. long neil j. long | 40 |
    • The peripheral programs of the museum (lobby, cafe, archives and administration) are housed in two wings nestled within the constructed glacis. Within the wings, vertical voids are utilized as a means of capturing light without excessive heat gain. Externally, the wings are clad in perforated steel panels custom-fabricated to echo lantern patterns found within the Spanish Quarter. Throughout the day, the internal array of shadow and light becomes a measure of time, while at night, the glow from within projects the patterns of light outwards - becoming a symbolic beacon of light on the St. Augustine waterfront. At the same time, the building’s facade minimizes light pollution thereby mitigating potential harmful effects to coastal wildlife. a bridge provides visitors with exterior passage and interior courtyard views without requiring entry to the museum | 41 | neil j. long neil j. long | 42 |
    • | 43 | neil j. long neil j. long | 44 |
    • | 45 | neil j. long neil j. long | 46 |
    • skin research project 2010 location: Chicago computer modeling: Rhinoceros with Grasshopper rendering: V-Ray environmental analysis: Ecotect
    • a thickened skin rethinking high-rise living | 49 | neil j. long neil j. long | 50 |
    • marina city towers residential floor plans a city within a city (parking floors 1 - 20) sax hotel architect: Bertrand Goldberg constructed: 1964 private drive height: 587 ft program: mixed use / parking / residential N. DEARBORN STREET house of blues N. STATE STREET east tower west tower east tower floor plan 21st - 52nd smith & wollensky CHICAGO RIVER east tower floor plan 53rd - 60th | 51 | neil j. long neil j. long | 52 |
    • concrete problems nine suns a skeleton in need of skin When Marina City was built, it was the tallest reinforced concrete According to Chinese legend, for thousands of years the structure in the world. This engineering feat was obviously a point Earth was scorched by ten suns. One day a man named of pride for Goldberg and his team of designers, as they chose to Hou Yi came along and shot down nine of the suns along leave a key element of architecture missing - the skin. While the with a few flying beasts and dragons thus saving the radial formwork of the towers has become a hallmark of Chicago people of the world from suffering inevitable destruction. architectural style and innovation, it has not withstood the elements It is interesting to consider only nine of the ten suns were as well as it has the critics. shot down. It shows how vital the sun is for sustaining life, while recognizing too much of a good thing can cause If one were to visit the towers on any given day one would find a now destruction. familiar array of scaffolding and construction screens wrapping the towers. The Marina City Condominium Association reports spending This study of Marina City Towers focused on ways to millions of dollars to fix severe structural damage to the signature address the building’s emergent environmental and cantilevered concrete balconies. Residents complain of constantly programmatic needs. Specifically, it examined how an rain-swept balconies and of puddling from deformations in the floor architectural skin may be utilized to protect an otherwise plates due to constant bombardment by wind. “skinless” building from the elements and how that then may affect the interactive spaces of high-rise living. It was important with Marina City Towers to respect the character of the existing structure, while allowing a new identity to emerge. This is fitting given the parable of the story is that survival is a product of both innovation and adaptation; in other words, evolution. wind swept rain severe concrete damage | 53 | neil j. long neil j. long | 54 |
    • sun mapping The initial skin studies began by addressing environmental issues of wind, wind analysis As Marina City Towers are circular in design with sixteen bays rotated on sun and rain. There are essentially nine hours in a day when sun-shading is center, it is equally exposed in every direction, making it especially difficult absolutely critical, especially for a high-rise building. to adapt to continually changing conditions. Wind, unlike sun exposure, is far from constant. However, these prevailing wind diagrams clearly show a predominance of winds from the southwest, especially in the winter months. current conditions optimized sun shades current conditions optimized sun shades current conditions optimized sun shades (june - august) (june - august) (june - august) 9 am 12 pm 3 pm spring summer 10 am 1 pm 4 pm 11 am 2 pm autumn winter 5 pm morning sun mid-day sun evening sun prevailing winds annual average winds | 55 | neil j. long neil j. long | 56 |
    • modularity studies variable components To create a building skin, a cylindrical form was populated with modular components to compliment the repeated modularity of the towers. Secondarily, the components were varied as they were “grafted” onto the surface, adapting to the given conditions while creating functional ornament and visual complexity. The modular investigations continued by developing ways of populating surfaces with sets of components subtly varied according to irradiation maps. With this particular example, a component was stacked and then rotated to varying degrees relative to the sun-shading desired, thereby populating the cylindrical surface with a uniform gradient. A more complex surface would produce a larger variance in gradation. A full exploration of this concept can be seen in the Harvard exhibition of Adaptive Fritting, by Chuck Hoberman. | 57 | neil j. long neil j. long | 58 |
    • skin gradations north south Sun studies show how “wrinkles” in a skin can The plasticity of the skin may be manipulated by produce hot and cold spots throughout the day, populating the surface with varying apertures. as opposed to the smooth surface of a perfect As shown, four components populate several sphere that has a constant gradient of irradiation “wrinkled” surfaces and are varied relative to that shifts throughout the day. anticipated average daily irradiation. west east | 59 | neil j. long neil j. long | 60 |
    • dynamic shading wind catchers hot air ventilated through top of pleats pleated surface creates shifting by natural shift in air pressure pockets of warm and cool air throughout day sun variations indirect/diffused light enters during peak sun hours cooling winds may be harvested through overlap of pleated surface sun shaded by canopy cooling oblique winds hot air ventilated through opposite enter folds in skin scoop by natural shift in air pressure self-shading surface could offer transparency cooling winds may be harvested for views with minimal heat gain from prevailing direction turbulence deflected by curved surfaces and driven upward, avoiding wind-swept balconies | 61 | neil j. long neil j. long | 62 |
    • programmatic wrapping variable component as generator of surface modulation wrapping skin The boundaries of the skin were expanded so that a type of communal dwelling was realized around the exterior of the towers. An extended, fully inhabitable component was generated, with possibilities for highly interactive elements typically not realized by the autonomous balconies of high-rise apartment buildings. This would afford all residents access to the full 360 degrees of the building’s views. To reduce wind resistance, the curvature of the component shifts as it wraps the building, creating a cork-screw effect, directing turbulent winds from all directions up and around the building. Further investigation of this new typology of high-rise living would realize the expansion of public space at the lower parking levels and possibilities for shared amenities between the towers and the adjacent Hotel Sax. expanded balconies | 63 | neil j. long neil j. long | 64 |
    • balcony expansion stack effect & weather screening summer sun sun scoop open closed closed rain offset enclosure enclosure enclosure The extended balconies are offset from the existing towers, creating semi-public promenades accessible only by turbulence residents. Likewise, an atrium- like space is made in the gap between the new balconies and the old, providing ventilation, views and light. cool air hot air increased stack effect winter sun sun scoop summer winter spring & autumn During the summer the skin During the winter all apertures One of the main reasons to pull the skin shift is allowed to breath through of the skin (balcony and away from the original structure was to In order to avoid limiting balcony and overhead doors. overhead doors) are closed, displace the most severe conditions of the exterior views or inhibiting This provides natural, yet allowing the skin to serve as a high-rise typology, wind and rain. So when the desired winter sun from controlled airflow into the large insulator for the building. the exterior temperatures are optimal apartments while protecting The stack effect is still present, for natural ventilation, but the exterior reaching apartment interiors, the interiors from excessive as towers naturally induce conditions do not allow for the facade to be the new promenade is shifted wind. A natural convection variances in air pressure as completely open, vents at the bottom and upward, so that views are occurs at each apartment, they rise. However, it is now top of the skin may be used to induce the increased and winter sun angles contributing to a stack effect not about cooling the interior stack effect. In fact, such a configuration from the months of November in the surrounding atrium space, but providing a winter would produce a more intense, yet to February can reach deeper space. garden for the occupants of regulated stack effect than if the facade was into the new atrium space. the building. opened at individual balcony apertures. | 65 | neil j. long neil j. long | 66 |
    • balcony typography extended balcony above extended balcony below The new balcony and overhead wing-like doors can be opened durring favorable conditions thereby allowing the encompassing atrium space to be naturally ventilated by oblique winds. The twisting skin also provides varying spatial conditions relative to the fixed module of the original bays. As shown in the diagrams to the right this was achieved by modulating the shape of the extended bays on a fixed axis. The twisting curvature of the skin allows for nine variations in the extended balconies relative to the fixed module of the original towers. As the sun shifts no space is overheated as the rotated curve of the new balconies are incrementally shaded by the floors above. | 67 | neil j. long neil j. long | 68 |
    • summer terrace june 21st 10:45 am | 69 | neil j. long neil j. long | 70 |
    • winter garden december 21st 10:45 am | 71 | neil j. long neil j. long neil j. long | 72 |
    • new high-rise living | 73 | neil j. long neil j. long | 74 |
    • neil j. long graduate portfolio 1810 NW 23rd Blvd / Apt 231 Gainesville, FL 32605 neiljlong@gmail.com (630) 217-5664 | 75 | neil j. long