Life Cycle of the Adventist Church
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Life Cycle of the Adventist Church

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  • K. Importance of discipleship and grounding people in the Faith.
  • G – Ritual formality is not only related to liturgical churches. Contemporary/charismatic worship can be the same J – Moberg says this includes “conformity to society’s folkways and mores.
  • N – Moberg includes: Scouts, Athletics, Camping, and Counseling!! Jacques Ellul says regarding Ephesus – “ All has become cold and flat. In short, we find a church become institutional, exact, rigorous, moral, ceasing to live by the impulsion of a force ever new. Now this is decadence; it is 1 st Corinthians 13.” (Should read that. When?
  • J – Moberg says this includes “conformity to society’s folkways and mores.

Life Cycle of the Adventist Church Life Cycle of the Adventist Church Presentation Transcript

  • 1 2 4 5 Formal Organization Maximum Efficiency Institutionalization Disintegration Incipient Organization
  • 1 2 4 5 Formal Organization Maximum Efficiency Institutionalization Disintegration His analysis sheds a great deal of light on the development and current status of Adventism, even though his model does not provide a perfect correlation. leading Evangelical sociologists Incipient Organization
  • 1. Stage of Incipient Organization A. Dissatisfaction with existing churches B. Collective excitement C. Charismatic, authoritarian, prophetic leaders D. Sometimes hard to designate a founder According to Moberg
  • 1 2 3 4 5 Formal Organization Maximum Efficiency Institutionalization Disintegration 1. Stage of Incipient Organization in Sabbatarian Adventism 1844-1863. Incipient Organization
  • 1. Stage of Incipient Organization in Sabbatarian Adventism , 1844 -1863.
    • Dissatisfaction with existing churches
    • Charismatic, authoritarian, prophetic leaders
    • Collective excitement
    • Ecstatic religious experiences are reported in the early writings of both James and Ellen White, with reports of tongues-speaking in 1847, 1848, 1849, and 1851
    • Some who later became our spiritual forefathers were involved in them . These experiences may be noted as:
      • physical prostration;
      • shouting the praises of God;
      • speaking in unknown tongues;
      • divine healing.
        • (ARTHUR L. WHITE, "Tongues in Early SDA History," Review and Herald , March 15, 1973).
    In addition to singing , shoutin g, laughing , and speaking in tongues , early Adventists often experienced prostration , or being " slain by the Spirit .“ James White said:“We all lay on the floor under the power of God.” Early Adventists also practiced the " holy kiss ," or "salutation," when meeting and parting. Ron Graybill http://www.ministrymagazine.org/archive/1991/October/enthusiasm-in-early-adventist-worship 1. Stage of Incipient Organization in Sabbatarian Adventism 1844-1863. B. Collective excitement
  • A. Formal Organization B. Formal ministry and membership B. Separation from parent group C. Membership goals D. Seeks the perfection of society & individuals E. Creed protects orthodoxy F. Slogans that emphasize group's distinctives G. Distinctive code of behavior H. Differences draw persecution (Persecution intensifies unity) 2. Period of Formal Organization According to Moberg
  • 1 2 3 4 5 Formal Organization Maximum Efficiency Institutionalization Disintegration 2. Period of Formal Adventist Organization, 1861-1900 Incipient Organization
    • Formal Organization.
    2. Period of Formal Adventist Organization, 1861-1900
    • Early Adventists on Organization:
    • Formal organization was taboo to most Adventists and some believed that it was the first
    • step toward another Babylon
        • http://www.whiteestate.org/books/mol/Chapt37.html
    • “ it becomes Babylon the moment
    • it is organized!”
        • George Storrs, “Come out of Her My People,” Midnight Cry, Feb.
        • 15, 1844, 238.
    • Formal Organization.
    2 . Period of Formal Adventist Organization, 1861-1900
    • Changing Attitude to Organization: Reason:
      • Hold Property
      • License Ministers and Regularize Church Membership
      • Promote Orthodoxy
    • “ it is a lamentable fact that many of our Advent brethren who made a timely escape from the bondage of the different churches [Babylon] . . . Have since been in a more perfect Babylon than ever before. Gospel order
    • has been too much overlooked by them. . . . Many in their zeal to come
    • out of Babylon, partook of a rash, disorderly spirit, and were soon
    • found in a perfect Babel of confusion. . . . To suppose that the
    • church of Christ is free from restraint and discipline, is the wildest
    • fanaticism.”
      • [James White], “Gospel Order,” Review and Herald, Dec. 6, 1853, 173.
    • Formal Organization.
    • First Organization, Michigan Conference,1861
    • General Conference was organized in 1963,
    • Followed b y the following Structure
    2. Period of Formal Adventist Organization, 1861-1900
    • G. Creed protects orthodoxy
    • Against a CREED but came up with the first formal SATEMENT OF
    • FUNDAMENTAL BELIEFS in the 1870’s
    • H. Distinctive code of behavior
    • Distinctive Seventh-day Adventist lifestyle package:
        • E.G. White’s Health Reform (June 1863)
        • Noncombatancy,
        • Personal adornment,
        • First health-care institution.
    • Differences draw persecution. (Persecution intensifies because of Sunday laws, but persecution promotes unity) http://www.adventist.org/beliefs/church-manual/index.html
    2. Period of Formal Adventist Organization, 1861-1900
    • Formal Organization.
    • Formal ministry and membership,
    • Ministers accredited. Members signing a church covenant
    • Separation from parent group
    • Membership goals
    • Seeks the perfection of society & individuals
  • 1 2 3 4 5 Formal Organization Maximum Efficiency Institutionalization Disintegration 3. Stage of Maximum Efficiency in Adventism, 1901-1956 Incipient Organization
  • A. Leadership is less emotional - more statesmanly B. Rational organization replace charismatic leadership C. Historians & apologists emerge with “propaganda” D. Intellectuals repelled by earlier emotionalism are drawn in E. Moves from a despised sect to near-equality with recognized organizations Moberg 3. Stage of Maximum Efficiency According to Moberg
  • F. Hostility toward others diminishes G. First generation of converts has mostly died H. Development of committees & boards I. Rituals and procedures are seen as means, not ends J. Rapid, but uneven growth with periods of integrating new members K. Incomplete integration gives rise to internal dissension Moberg 3. Stage of Maximum Efficiency According to Moberg
    • Rational organization replace charismatic leadership
    • Development of committees & boards
    • Rituals and procedures are seen as means, not ends
    3. Stage of Maximum Efficiency in Adventism, 1901-1956
  • Reorganization for Mission Unless reorganization is done “it will take a millennium to give this message to the world” A. G. Daniells, “The Field,” 1901 General Conference Bulletin, 48
    • Moves from a despised sect to near-equality with recognized organizations
    • Hostility toward others diminishes
    3. Stage of Maximum Efficiency in Adventism, 1901-1956 “ ...it is perfectly possible to be a Seventh-day Adventists and be a true follower of Jesus Christ...” We take this position based on the content of the doctrine which was stated in an official SDA publication (1957) entitled Questions on Doctrine . Walter Martin, Kingdom of the Cults (Bethany House, Minneapolis, Minnesota), Updated edition 1997, p.517
  • 3. Stage of Maximum Efficiency in Adventism, 1901-1956
    • Rapid, but uneven growth with periods of integrating new members
    • Incomplete integration gives rise to internal dissension
    • Institutions, Rituals and Procedures are seen as means, not Ends. (The End was the Gospel to the World)
    Growth of Missions
  • 3. Stage of Maximum Efficiency in Adventism, 1901-1956
    • Rapid, but uneven growth with periods of integrating new members
  • A. Formalism saps group's vitality B. Bureaucracy concerned with perpetuating its own interests not original theological distinctives C. Administration centers in self-perpetuating boards D. Those in authority talk one thing and practice another E. Mechanism of structure becomes an end in itself F. Creeds become venerated relics Moberg 4. The Institutional Stage According to Moberg
  • G. Organized worship becomes a ritual, empty formality H. Symbolism replaces internal, personal devotion J. Conflict with the outside world is replaced with toleration K. Membership standards relaxed to gain respectable members L. Feelings of intimacy decline Moberg 4. The Institutional Stage According to Moberg
  • M. Membership becomes passive and remote from leadership N. Activities once considered secular now become major attractions O. Institution becomes the master, not the servant P. Sermons become topical lectures, not fervent discourses on sin, salvation, and doctrine Moberg 4. The Institutional Stage According to Moberg
  • 1 2 3 4 5 Formal Organization Maximum Efficiency Institutionalization Disintegration Are we already in the Institutional Stage? 1956- . Incipient Organization
  • 4. Are we already in the Institutional Stage ?
    • A. Massive Institutionalization
      • 703 Hospitals, Clinics, Nursing Homes ect
        • 1748 Secondary Schools
        • 5899 Primary Schools
        • 110 College/Universities
      • 59 Publishing Houses
      • 19 Food Factories
      • 14 Media Centers
      • 98  Radio/TV Stations
      • Etc.
    Hospitals and Sanitariums................................................................... 167 Nursing Homes and Retirement Centers................................................... 132 Clinics and Dispensaries................................................ 351
    • . Adventist Bolingbrook Medical Center, Bolingbrook,
    • . Adventist Glen Oaks Hospital, Glendale Heights,
    • . Adventist Hinsdale Hospital, Hinsdale, Ill.
    • . Adventist La Grange Memorial Hospital LaGrange,
    • . Adventist Medical Center, Portland, Ore.
    • . Avista Adventist Hospital, Louisville, Colo.
    • . Castle Medical Center, Kailua, Hawaii
    • . Central Valley General Hospital, Hanford, Calif.
    • . Central Texas Medical Center, San Marcos, Tex.
    • . Chij1j1ewa Valle~ Hospital, Durand, Wisc.
    • . Emo[):-Adventist Hospital, Smyrna, Ga.
    • . Feather River Hospital, Paradise, Calif.
    • . Florida Hospital Fish Memorial, Orange City, Fla.
    • . Florida Hospital DeLand, DeLand, Fla.
    • . Florida Hospital Flagler, Palm Coast, Fla.
    • . Florida Hospital Lake Placid, Lake Placid, Fla.
    • . Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center, Daytona Beach, Fla.
    • . Florida Hospital Oceanside, Ormond Beach, Fla.
    • . Florida Hospital Orlando -which is composed of:
      • Orlando (Main Campus):
      • Altamonte;
      • Apopka:
      • Celebration Health;
      • East Orlando:
      • Kissimmee;
      • Winter Park Memorial Hosj1ital
    • . Florida Hospital Sebring, Sebring, Fla.
    • . Florida Hospital Waterman, Tavares, Fla.
    • . Florida Hospital Wauchula, Wauchula, Fla.
    • . Florida Hospital Zephyrhills, Zephyrhills, Fla.
    • . Frank R. Howard Memorial Hospital, Willits, Calif.
    • . Glendale Adventist Medical Center, Glendale, Calif.
    • . Gordon Hospital, Calhoun, GA ~
    • . Hanford CommunitY Medical Center, Hanford, CA
    • . Huguly Memorial Medical Center, Ft. Worth,
    • Jellico Community Hospital, Jellico, Tenn.
    • . Kettering Medical Center, Kettering, Ohio
    • . Littleton Adventist Hospital, Littleton, Colo.
    • . Lorna Linda University Medical Center, Lorna Linda, Calif.
    • . Manchester Memorial Hospital, Manchester, Ky.
    • . Metroolex Hospital, Killeen, Tex.
    • . North Hawaii Community Hospital, Kamuela, Hawaii (Big Island)
    • . Park Ridge Health, Hendersonville, N.C.
    • . Parker Adventist Hospital, Parker, Colo.
    • . Parkview Adventist Medical Center, Brunswick, Maine
    • . Porter Adventist Hospital, Denver, Colo.
    • . Redbud Community Hospital, Clearlake, Calif.
    • . Rollins-Brook Community Hospital, Lampasas, Tex.
    • . St. Helena Hospital, St. Helena, Calif.
    • . San Joaquin Community!): Hospital, Bakersfield, Calif.
    • . Selma Community Hospital, Selma, Calif.
    • . Shady Grove Adventist Hospital, Rockville, Md.
    • . Shawnee Mission Medical Center, Shawnee Mission, Kansas
    • . Simi Valley Hospital, Simi Valley, Calif.
    • . Sonora Regional Medical Center, Sonora, Calif.
    • . South Coast Medical! Center, Laguna Beach, Calif.
    • . Tillamook County General Hospital, Tillamook, Ore.
    • . Ukiah Valley Medical Center, Ukiah, Calif.
    • . Washington Adventist Hospital, Tacoma Park, Md.
    • . White Memorial Medical Center, Los Angeles, Calif.
    “ Adventist health care facilities tend to have minimal impact on the lives of their patrons” Knight, 49 Changed “sacrificial” wage to “community ” pay and centralization of Health Systems “Adventism saw itself as separate from the world and unique, its development of a centralized health care system was part of a national trend” G.A.Fuller, “The New Adventist Health Care Corporations”, Spectrum 11 (June 81), 16-22
    • Florida Hospital Fish Memorial, Orange City, Fla.
    • Florida Hospital DeLand, DeLand, Fla.
    • Florida Hospital Flagler, Palm Coast, Fla.
    • Florida Hospital Lake Placid, Lake Placid, Fla.
    • Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center, Daytona Beach, Fla.
    • Florida Hospital Oceanside, Ormond Beach, Fla.
    • Florida Hospital Orlando – is composed of:
    • Orlando (Main Campus)
    • Altamonte
    • Apopka
    • Celebration Health
    • East Orlando
    • Kissimmee
    • Winter Park Memorial Hospital
    • Florida Hospital Sebring, Sebring, Fla.
    • Florida Hospital Waterman, Tavares, Fla.
    • Florida Hospital Wauchula, Wauchula, Fla.
    • Florida Hospital Zephyrhills, Zephyrhills, Fla.
    Adventist Health System Number of Employees: 17,059 One of top 10 employers in Orlando Adventist Health System has quickly grown to become the largest not-for-profit Protestant healthcare provider in the nation.
  • A. Huge Bureaucracies B. Bureaucracy concerned with perpetuating its own interests not original theological distinctives C. Administration centers in self-perpetuating boards 4. Are we already in the Institutional Stage ? 1956- The “church has over-institutionalized, overbureaucratized, and seems to be in the process of becoming increasingly happier with the kingdom of this world” , G. Knight, The Fat Lady and the Kingdom, p.41 “… many parts of the world there appears to be more salaried ordained talent behind desks than in frontline pastoral and evangelistic posts. G. Knight, The Fat Lady and the Kingdom, p.41
  • CENTRAL CALIFORNIA CONFERENCE OF SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTISTS Churches, 129; membership, 35,289; 84 ministers 38 Conference Administrators Ordained Ministers Members per Minister 4. Are we already in the Institutional Stage ? 1956-
  • Oklahoma Conference. Churches, 70; membership, 8,058; 24 ordained ministers, 12 Licensed ministers, 17 Administrators Ordained Ministers Ord. Ministers Administrators
  • AUSTRIAN UNION OF CHURCHES CONFERENCE Churches, 49; membership, 3,897; 29 Ordained Ministers and 18 Union Conference Administrators Ministers Administrators 4. Are we already in the Institutional Stage ? 1956-
  • Belgium and Luxembourg Conference. Churches, 29; membership, 2,078; population 7 ordained pastors and 9 Administrators Administrators Pastors 4. Are we already in the Institutional Stage ? 1956-
  • Number of Members per Minister 4. Are we already in the Institutional Stage ? 1956-
  • Malcolm Bull and Keith Lockhart, S eeking a Sanctuary: Seventh-day Adventism and the American Dream, (2 nd ed), 122 “ From an economic point of view, the church’s resources are concentrated on administration and institutions rather than on individual churches…” 4. Are we already in the Institutional Stage ? 1956-
  • J. Conflict with the outside world is replaced with toleration 4. Are we already in the Institutional Stage? “ Adventism was moving closer to conservative Protestant theology…” Our seminary received accreditation for the D.Min and Th.D from the Am. Assoc. of Theological Schools (1970) From 1965 on we held annual conversations with the World Council of Churches’ Faith and Order Commission In 1968 Jerry L. Pettis became the first Adventist Congressman “ The social alienation that had characterized its origins, though still alive, was no longer as all-inclusive and dominant in Adventist faith and practice as it had been” Gary Land (ed), Adventism in America, AU Press, 1998, p. 189
  • General Conference Bulletin 8 -Ninth Business Meeting, 57th General Conference Session, July 4, 2000,3:00pm, Toronto, Canada B. B. BEACH: “ One of the happy traditions of General Conference sessions in recent decades has been to have honored guests and observers from other churches in our midst. One of them is: Monsignor John A. Radano is a senior member of the Roman Catholic delegations and is head of the Western Section of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity [PCPCU], and principal liaison person between the Vatican and other ecclesiastical communities in the West.  “ Bert B. Beach's encounter with the Roman Pontiff came as a  member  of the Christian World Communions, and following a special  luncheon at the Vatican." Review Nov. 8, 2001 4. Are we already in the Institutional Stage?
  • M. Membership becomes passive and remote from leadership N. Activities once considered secular now become major attractions O. Institution becomes the master, not the servant P. Sermons become topical lectures, not fervent discourses on sin, salvation, and doctrine Moberg 4. The Institutional Stage According to Moberg
  • A. Formalism, indifference, obsolescence, absolutism, red tape, patronage, corruption B. Loss of confidence in leadership C. Many withdraw D. Support becomes nominal and half-hearted E. Futile attempts at restoration by a few Moberg 5. Over-institutionalism Leads to Disintegration & Death According to Moberg
  • A. Formalism, indifference, obsolescence, absolutism, red tape, patronage, corruption B. Loss of confidence in leadership C. Many withdraw D. Support becomes nominal and half-hearted E. Futile attempts at restoration by a few Moberg 5. Can we avoid Over-institutionalism which Leads to Disintegration & Death or do we exhibit already some of Moberg’s Characteristics?
    • Of those born Adventist or entered Adventism along with a parent during childhood one third will leave the Church.
      • (GSS) The General Social Survey 1972-2000 (c.othr6(77)
    Third One Third 5. Over-institutionalism Leads to Disintegration & Death
  • The proportion of Adventists born into the church, remain loyal to it without ever faltering, and die within the faith in which they were raised may well be less than 20 percent of the total membership. Bull & Lockhart, Seeking a Sanctuary, 349 Adventist born die as Members
    • In the 5-year period between 2000-2004 5 million new believers joined the Church and over 1.4 million members left the church during that same period.
      • http://www.adventist.org/beliefs/other-documents/conserving-gains.html
    5. Over-institutionalism Leads to Disintegration & Death
  • D. Support becomes nominal and half-hearted 5. Over-institutionalism Leads to Disintegration & Death Tithe per capita as % of U.S. income per capita
  • http://www.adventiststatistics.org/view_Summary.asp?FieldInstID=1661991 Growth Rate
  • Adventism appears to have followed the Life Cycle of other Churches Will we follow it to the end? “ It is of crucial importance to realize that not one major religious revival in the history of Christianity has successfully escaped that process” of secularization and loss of it original missiological course. G. Knight, The Fat Lady and the Kingdom, p.41 “ This will not happen to the Seventh-day Adventist Church! This is not just another church – it is God’s Church!” Robert Pierson, at the G.C. annual council 1978
  • Donald McAdams expressed the challenge for the church best when he said that Adventism must “… retain the spark, commitment and message that gave the sect its original power, while accepting the institutional, structural and cultural changes that are the inevitable concomitant of growth in the real world” Donald McAdams, “The 1978 Annual Council…” Spectrum 9, p.8.
  •