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120509 bite size edu

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Application for Innopitch competition

Application for Innopitch competition

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  • 1. ‘Bite-size edu’ Initial proposal May 2012
  • 2. Bite-size edu is an affordable, interactive m-Education innovation which provides learners with 24/7 access to acatalogue of short audio/visual modules aligned to high school curriculum, an interactive peer forum and a repository of practice examples with instant, actionable feedback
  • 3. South Africa’s educational outcomes are poor and deteriorating In 2003 South Africa "Maths literacy... what is that? Its worse than scored lowest in the the arithmetic I did under Bantu education" Trends in International Mathematics and Dr Mamphela Ramphele (Mar 2012) Science Study (TIMSS) Nearly all white kids get Only 35% of our kids can read, with results through matric and some ranging from 12% in Mpumalanga to a 60% go on to tertiary - while "high" 43% in Western Cape. only 50% of black kids get to matric and 12% to Graeme Bloch (Former DBSA education university. policy analyst, 2011) Tafelberg (2009)SOURCE: ‘The Toxic Mix: What is wrong with South Africa’s schools and how to fix it’ (Tafelberg, 2009)
  • 4. Root causes of this are long standing issues which are hard to reverse Issue Example • Low level of training and qualifications • KZN alone has 13000 under-qualified Poor teacher among teachers teachers performance • Average learner to educator ratio in SA high schools is 29.4 while global average is 18 • Parents and peers do not motivate students • Learners are encouraged to quit school and Weak learning to achieve academically begin ‘contributing’ to the family by culture searching for a job early on • No supplementary tuition or tutors • Quality tutoring ranging in cost from R40 to Lack of additional • Parents and family members are unfamiliar R200 per hour is not accessible to learners support with new curriculum and unable to assist of lower LSM (often legacy of Bantu education) • Relatively high average cost of textbooks • Textbooks not delivered to public schools in Low access to • Insufficient supply of up-to-date resources a timely manner e.g. Eastern Cape this Jan study resources caused by transition in curriculum (’06 – ’08) • Provinces acquired wrong titles which resulted in a capacity backlog for publishers could not be used by schools Inadequate • No standardised systems in place to assess • SA is unable to benchmark literacy and tracking and and evaluate whether learners are achieving numeracy scores against international monitoring curriculum outcomes and to identify key standards on an annual basis areas in curriculum that require improvementSource: South African Democratic Teachers Union; 2009 Dinaledi Schools Project (DoE and business partnership)
  • 5. We dream of a perfect world we could have a ‘fix’ for it all, but in fact, to some extent by using technology we already do... Conceptual ‘fix’ Proof of concept • Leverage the few exceptional teachers in the • Khan Academy: 3200 educational videos Excellent teachers system to teach a larger “virtual” classroom posted YouTube 147,344,639 lessons for all delivered http://www.khanacademy.org • Mobilink’s SMS literacy project in Pakistan (case study incl. in appendix) • Society shows immediate reward for • Social networks e.g., Facebook + Twitter Strong learning academic excellence are being used more than Google for culture • Peers engage in friendly competition on referrals and everyday questions academic grounds • Mobile gaming e.g.Dr Math • Tutors-on-demand at low cost • Nokia Momaths: MxiT based Gr.10 Support available • Instant, actionable feedback mathematics learning application including 24/7 • Virtual “study” village where peers can live chats and practice test with instant problem solve and tutor each other feedback (low cost) www.momaths.org Free and timely • Free online educational material in the form • Aakash, India’s $35 tablet for education access to study of electronic text books and “bite sized” • UNISA is developing R30 textbook concept resources video/audio catalogues (is R30 still not too expensive?) Just –In-Time • Consistent feedback on learner progress • Polls and online surveys are used by tracking and across the country by way of learner input marketers daily monitoring based assessments done on a regular basis • Company’s sales force tracks customer satisfaction via mobile phone assessments Can technology leapfrog the South African education system quickly, affordably and with wide reach as it has in other countries???Source: South African Democratic Teachers Union; 2009 Dinaledi Schools Project (DoE and business partnership)
  • 6. In SA vs. RoW a greater case can be made for mobile technology.Even from a broadband perspective, mobile accounts for moresubscribers than traditional fixed lines Context Broadband subscribers ▪ Low PC penetration %, thousand Fixed Mobile CAGR, and poor fixed 2005-11 broadband 1 infrastructure with 22 75 211 482 972 100% = 91% little coverage 9 13 9 8 7 3 5 10 12 291% ▪ Telkom – local 7 18 incumbent offering ADSL broadband 29 38 317% ▪ Mobile Internet 91 offered 77 by three providers: 68 Vodacom, MTN, and 53 42 92% iBurst ▪ Aggressive rollout of the 3G network 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 H1 by Vodacom Broadband 0.2% 0.6% 1.7% 3.7% 7.4% penetration1 Vodacom owns 10% stake in iBurstSources: Company reports; BMI-T; Pyramid
  • 7. The high level of accessibility, affordability and convenience makemobile connection a winning formula in SA relative to computers 120% • In 2010 ,SA’s mobile penetration was already 97% and was expected to grow at 6% CAGR between 97% 100% 2010 and 2015. • “Mobile is the PC and e-Reader of Africa” 80% • Mobile is even used for browsing internet more than 60% computers. 39% of urban South Africans and 27% of rural users are now browsing the Internet on their 40% phones due to higher accessibility 20% • Mobiles are a part of our culture and society, today 12% there is no “technology-free” society so why would 0% education need to be kept “technology-free”? Penetration in 2010 • However, a solution is not as simple as “cut and Computer Mobile paste” from existing online resources Vs. “m-Education is not just e-learning gone for a walk” – J. Traxler**John Traxler is Director of the Learning Lab and Professor of Mobile Learning at the University of Wolverhampton.SOURCE: WCIS+; The Mobility 2011 research project, conducted by World Wide Worx and backed by First National Bank
  • 8. What is m-Education? Mobile Education: Various definitions “The ability to access educational resources, tools, and materials at anytime from anywhere using a mobile device” – GSMA development fund (2010) Key elements ▪ Enhanced learner “Learning enhanced by the use of mobile outcomes technologies, or learning by people, mobile, or ▪ Using a mobile device remote, from a fixed location in a place, time, and technology or context of their choosing” ▪ Accessing educational – Gartner (2010) resources anytime and from anywhere “Knowledge transfer events, content, tools, and applications built using mobile information architecture and accessed on handheld computing devices” – Ambient (2010)SOURCE: GSMA; Gartner; Ambient
  • 9. One can look at m-Education as a spectrum Mobile Location-based/ Classroom-enhanced Social learning and learning Personalized learning Digital inclusion contextual learning learning collaboration outcomes Foundation Teacher training Health education Vocational Languages Life skills Learning Primary Ongoing Patient education Certified self- Practice/ Development area Secondary education and Practitioner improvement improve learning education Tertiary support Education support User Student Teacher Employee Self-motivated Independent Learning Complementary (as a stand-alone way of accessing educational method (support to other learning activities) tools, resources) Non- Academic Content Government Mobile network Technology Players government community providers organizations operations vendors organizations “m-Education has the potential to transform education service delivery with improved learning outcomes” - GSMANote: mobile learning outcomes defined in appendixSources: GSMA; Gartner; team analysis
  • 10. What our solution looks like... bite-size edu Bite-size edu is an affordable, interactive m-Education innovation which provides learners with 24/7 access to a catalogue of short audio/visual modules aligned to high school curriculum; an interactive peer forum and a repository of practice examples with instant, actionable feedback ▪ Accessible via low end phones ▪ Affordable to all learners ▪ Interactive learning material, practice and receive feedback ▪ High quality of teaching scaled via audio and visual ▪ Aligned to SA High School curricula ▪ To be used as an additional resource outside of traditional schooling systems and independent of teachers ▪ “Bite-size” or short modular learning ▪ 24/7 availability ▪ Harnessing a competitive learning environment/gaming ▪ Flexibility to customise learning to learner’s specific needs ▪ Create supportive and safe space to learn at own pace ▪ A learning community/virtual village with peer forums (online chat or instant messaging)
  • 11. Where does bite-size edu fit into the m-Education spectrum? Where bite-sized edu fits in Mobile Location-based/ Classroom-enhanced Social learning and learning Personalized learning Digital inclusion contextual learning learning collaboration outcomes Foundation Teacher training Health education Vocational Languages Life skills Learning Primary Ongoing Patient education Certified self- Practice/ Development area Secondary education and Practitioner improvement improve learning education Tertiary support Education support User Student Teacher Employee Self-motivated Independent Learning Complementary (as a stand-alone way of accessing educational method (support to other learning activities) tools, resources) Non- Academic Content Government Mobile network Technology Players government community providers organizations operations vendors organizations “m-Education has the potential to transform education service delivery with improved learning outcomes” - GSMANote: mobile learning outcomes defined in appendixSources: GSMA; Gartner; team analysis
  • 12. bite-size edu requires an intersection of desirability, viability and feasibility Desirability:Why would high learners want to use bite-size?What would motivate them to continue using it?Why would parents and teachers encourage usage?Why would peers recommend it to one another?What would make a learner try it for the first time?How would you build a large population of users quickly? A C Desirability Feasibility Viability:What business model is required to make bite-size self sustaining?What scale is required to make content generation inexpensive ona per user basis?How do you make bite-size affordable for the learner (end user)? BWhat government institutions ,foundations , private sectorinstitutions incl. networks would fund bite-size? ViabilityHow do you manage the high cost of quality teachers? Feasibility:How do you provide a quality audio visual experience over a low-end mobile device at low cost?What existing platforms can be leveraged?What other options or “add-ons” could enable this experience andprovide the reach/scale of mobile phones?
  • 13. A Some thoughts on desirability• Key is that learners would want to learn via bite-size edu because they see results, additionally: – Online community creates motivation – Adequate marketing drives awareness of product among peers – Gaming component to learning – At scale competitive nature kicks in within schools – Tailored learning – “I will only need to learn what I am struggling with” – “bite sized” lessons mean I can learning whenever, wherever– How do we encourage teachers + parents to support usage?– There is a big requirement to test the tool to see if it actually yields results...– Current thinking on what the tool would actually look like? • Instructive learning – Database of bite-sized modules with audio and visual explanations of topics delivered by a good teacher – Tutor “live questions” and support • Independent learning – Online practice resources by module with instant feedback – Online competitions and peer learning forum
  • 14. B Some thoughts on Viability• Key is affordability and sustainability• From a financial perspective: What business model is required? Unlike in an online system there will not be a need to distribute hardware (PCs or tablets) to students as they already own their own handsets however other cost drivers will be: – Content generation (can we use a model like Wikipedia i.e. User generated? Perhaps teachers can upload lessons online, the lessons are check before learners can access them) – Marketing (lesson from mNovels: usage and marketing are highly correlated, it gets costly quickly) – Online teachers and tutors?• Possible funding methods – Project becomes self funded: this will require leveraging scale i.e. spreading cost of content generation across multitude of users e.g. MxiT does well because it charges 40million users 1c per transaction; another option would be to allow an annual subscription similar to tuition fees in a distance learning model – Government/foundation funded: costs of development + data transmission absorbed by Department of Education or Department of Science & Technology. This could be in exchange for data gathering on student outcomes – Private sector funding: sponsorship by way of engineering, accounting and other quantitatively heavy firms in exchange for recruiting and scholarship opportunities – Network subsidised: data transmission costs absorbed by networks
  • 15. C Some thoughts on Feasibility • Key is developing the technology to transmit video + audio to basic handsets • We need to over come 3 issues: – Affordability of voice, sms and data transfer is still very high in South Africa. The average European spends 1% of their monthly salary on mobile. The average African spends 18%. – “Bring Your Own Technology” complicates the solution space as any solution needs to be universally compatible across various mobile phone models – Basic phone with basic functionality can be expected from the target market which limits solution space in terms of enhanced applications. While entry level mobiles are becoming “smarter” and more affordable, the bulk of high school users will still use battered, hand-me down mobile devices. • Currently low end phones that are wap enabled do have internet access however this is slow and expensive. It is much better to connect via an application platform such as mxit. However mxit does not currently have video transmission or audio (both are imperative to effective learning remotely case study: Khan Academy) • Does this technology already exist? What platforms currently exist? • This technology needs to be dirt cheap to ensure affordability of the tool • If it is not possible – what alternatives/handset “add-ons” could be distributed to make meet requirements • If we cant “add-on” how else can we transmit sound bites and video? How can we make a similar connection in this way? • Upfront the bulk of R&D needs to be in this area Basic Phone is a voice-centric, entry-level mobile device with basic functionality; Smartphone - Entry-Level is closer to an enhanced phone in specification and usage, but runs on an open operating systemSOURCE: mLab SA, GSMA
  • 16. Bite-size edu evaluation Drivers Challenges • High mobile growth rates and device • Pricing: ownership penetration – High tariffs/costs of mobile data • Advantage for first movers – Expensive handsets • Portable: Anytime, anywhere • Content: connectivity – Consumer demand must be stimulated • Less cultural resistance to mobile – Lack of local content usage – Content partnerships not developed • High social interaction and content • Technology: engagement (make learning fun) – Small screens of mobiles/PDAs • Ubiquitous connectivity encourages – Low memory compared to PC “snack learning” – Incompatible development platforms, OS and • Customizable to user needs non standardised devices • Government funding potential – Battery life – Absence of 3G networks • Regulatory status unclear
  • 17. Appendix
  • 18. Defining: Learning outcomes from m-Education Contextual learning Personalized learning Classroom-enhanced learning Provide location-based content, Customize pace and content to Enhance subjects and assessment e.g., at a museum, zoo, etc. each learner administration Social learning and collaboration Digital inclusion E.g., real-time sharing and Enable inclusion access in locations exchange of ideas, virtual games with less infrastructureSource: Gartner
  • 19. Case example: Mobilink’s SMS literacy project in Pakistan Pakistan context ▪ Early gains in literacy: share of ▪ Extremely low female literacy in Pakistan is typically girls receiving the lowest scores because the educational facility is far and the family dropping nearly 80% does not want the girl to go outside the house Project setup ▪ Impact to families: Participants ▪ Mobile operator Mobilink partnered with UNESCO and their families are even and local NGO Bunyad in 2009 taking advantage of other ▪ Project targeted 250 females aged 15-24 in a rural features of the phones, part of Southern Punjab including the calculator. ▪ Each of the girls was provided with a low-cost mobile phone capable of Urdu text SMS, with prepaid ▪ Socio-cultural acceptance: connection. While 56% of learners and their Learning program families initially maintained ▪ Teachers were trained by Bunyad to teach students negative feelings toward the how to read and write using mobile phones program, 87% were satisfied ▪ The girls received up to six messages a day on a with its results by the end variety of topics including religion, health and nutrition, and were expected to practice reading and writing down the messages and responding to their teachers via SMSSOURCE: GSMA
  • 20. Many types of educational programs can be carried out through mobile handsets Basic self Assistance based Advanced real-time Type of learning Cancer awareness through Student-teacher based Live and interactive learning SMS and IVRS portal remote tutor-helpline through session through chat IM, call, SMS videocall, GPRS Complexity of learning program Tata Teleservices Mobilink Learn English service SMS literacy project Device capability Basic Handset University of Wolverhampton Multiple participating Maryland Local Authority institutions Digital library Learning2go MoLeNet project Smartphone Entry level Basic Phone is a voice-centric, entry-level mobile device with basic functionality; Smartphone - Entry-Level is closer to an enhanced phone in specification and usage, but runs on an open operating systemSOURCE: GSMA