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  • Functional Business Systems: Information systems within a business organization that support one of the traditional functions of business such as marketing, finance, or production. Functional business systems can be either operations or management information systems. <br /> Marketing: Accounting: <br /> - Customer relationship management- Order processing <br /> - Interactive marketing- Inventory control <br /> - Sales force automation- Accounts receivable <br /> - Accounts payable <br /> Human Resource Management- Payroll <br /> - Compensation analysis- General ledger <br /> - Employee skills inventory <br /> - Personnel requirements forecastingFinance: <br /> - Cash management <br /> Productions/Operations- Credit management <br /> - Manufacturing resource planning- Investment management <br /> - Manufacturing execution systems- Capital budgeting <br /> - Process control- Financial forecasting <br /> Teaching Tips <br /> This slide corresponds to Figure 7.12 on pp. 232 and relates to the material on pp. 232-244. <br />
  • Marketing is concerned with the planning, promotion, and sale of existing products in existing markets and the development of new products and new markets to better serve present and potential customers. Marketing information systems assist marketers in meeting the information needs in each of the following areas: <br /> Sales Management. Here the information system helps plan, monitor, and support the performance of salespeople and sales of products and services. <br /> Sales Force Automation. Here the information system automates the recording and reporting of sales activity by salespeople and the communications and sales support from sales management. <br /> Product Management. Here the IS helps plan, monitor, and support the performance of products, product lines, and brands. <br /> Advertising and Promotion. Here information systems help select media and promotional methods and control and evaluate advertising and promotion results. <br /> Sales Forecasting. An information system can rapidly produce short- and long-term sales forecasts. <br /> Market Research. The tools of an information system can assist researchers in collecting and analyzing internal and external data on market variables, development, and trends. <br /> Marketing Management. Information systems can help marketing managers develop marketing strategies and plans based on corporate goals and market research and sales activity data, and monitor and support overall marketing activities. <br />
  • Manufacturing Information Systems support the production/operations function, which includes all activities concerned with the planning and control of the processes that produce goods and services. These operational systems can be divided into the following categories: <br /> Computer-Integrated Manufacturing. CIM stresses that the computer use in factory automation must be to: <br /> Simplify (reengineer) production processes, product designs, and factory organization as a vital foundation to automation and integration. <br /> Automate production processes and the business functions that support them with computers and robots. <br /> Integrate all production and support processes using computers and telecommunications networks. <br /> Process Control. Process control is the use of computers to control an ongoing physical process. Process control software uses mathematical models to analyze the ongoing process and compare it to standards or forecasts of required results. <br /> Machine Control. Also called numerical control, it uses computer programs for machine tools to convert geometric data from engineering drawings and machining instructions from process planning into commands that control the machines. <br /> Robotics. Robotics is the technology of building and using machines (robots) with computer intelligence and computer-controlled human like physical capabilities. <br /> Computer-Aided Engineering. Manufacturing engineers use powerful workstations with enhanced graphics and computational capabilities to simulate, analyze, and evaluate models of product design in less time and at lower cost than constructing physical prototypes. <br />
  • The human resource management (HRM) function involves the recruitment, placement, evaluation, compensation, and development of employees <br /> Goal of HRM is the effective and efficient use of the human resources of a company. Human resource information systems are designed to support: <br /> 1. Planning to meet the personnel needs of the business <br /> 2. Development of employees to their full potential <br /> 3. Control of all personnel policies and programs. <br /> Originally, businesses used computer-based information systems to: (1) Produce paychecks and reports, (2) maintain personnel records,and (3) analyze the use of personnel in business operations. Many firms have developed HRIS that support: <br /> 1. Recruitment, selection, and hiring. <br /> 2. Job placement <br /> 3. Performance appraisals <br /> 4. Employee benefits analysis <br /> 5. Training and development <br /> 6. Health, safety, and security. <br /> Teaching Tips <br /> This slide corresponds to Figure 7.21 on pp. 239 and relates to the material on pp. 238-240. <br />
  • Began to produce paychecks and payroll reports, manage personnel records and analyze the use of personnel in the business. <br /> Has gone far beyond that as shown in next slide. <br />
  • Accounting Information Systems are the oldest and most widely used information systems in business. They record and report business transactions and other economic events. Operational accounting systems emphasize legal and historical record-keeping and the production of financial statements. Management accounting systems focus on the planning and control of business operations. Six common purposes of accounting systems include: <br /> Order Processing. Or, sales order processing is an important transaction processing system which captures and processes customer orders and produces invoices for customers and data needed for sales analysis and inventory control. <br /> Inventory Control. These systems track and monitor levels of and changes in inventory. They may be programmed to notify managers if some threshold level of inventory is reached that requires a decision. They may also be equipped to handle routine re-order information. <br /> Accounts Receivable. Accounts receivable systems keep records of amounts owed by customers from data generated by customer purchases and payments. <br /> Accounts Payable. Accounts payable systems keep track of data concerning purchases from and payments to suppliers. <br /> Payroll. Payroll systems receive and maintain data from employee time cards and other work records to produce paychecks and other documents such as earning statements, payroll reports, and labor analysis reports. <br /> General Ledger. General ledger systems consolidate data received from accounts receivable, accounts payable, payroll, and other accounting information systems. <br /> Teaching Tips <br /> This slide corresponds to Figure 7.23 on pp. 241 and relates to the material on pp. 241-243. <br />
  • Oldest and most widely used information systems <br />
  • An organization can only work on only a limited number of projects at a given time due to limited resources so care must be taken when selecting the projects to build. <br /> After all possible projects are identified, those deemed most likely to yield significant organizational benefits, given available resources, are selected for subsequent development. <br /> Some possible evaluation criteria for ranking potential projects are: strategic alignment, potential benefits, potential costs and resource availability, project size and duration, and technical difficulty. <br />
  • An organization can only work on only a limited number of projects at a given time due to limited resources so care must be taken when selecting the projects to build. <br /> After all possible projects are identified, those deemed most likely to yield significant organizational benefits, given available resources, are selected for subsequent development. <br /> Some possible evaluation criteria for ranking potential projects are: strategic alignment, potential benefits, potential costs and resource availability, project size and duration, and technical difficulty. <br />
  • An organization can only work on only a limited number of projects at a given time due to limited resources so care must be taken when selecting the projects to build. <br /> After all possible projects are identified, those deemed most likely to yield significant organizational benefits, given available resources, are selected for subsequent development. <br /> Some possible evaluation criteria for ranking potential projects are: strategic alignment, potential benefits, potential costs and resource availability, project size and duration, and technical difficulty. <br />
  • An organization can only work on only a limited number of projects at a given time due to limited resources so care must be taken when selecting the projects to build. <br /> After all possible projects are identified, those deemed most likely to yield significant organizational benefits, given available resources, are selected for subsequent development. <br /> Some possible evaluation criteria for ranking potential projects are: strategic alignment, potential benefits, potential costs and resource availability, project size and duration, and technical difficulty. <br />
  • An organization can only work on only a limited number of projects at a given time due to limited resources so care must be taken when selecting the projects to build. <br /> After all possible projects are identified, those deemed most likely to yield significant organizational benefits, given available resources, are selected for subsequent development. <br /> Some possible evaluation criteria for ranking potential projects are: strategic alignment, potential benefits, potential costs and resource availability, project size and duration, and technical difficulty. <br />
  • An organization can only work on only a limited number of projects at a given time due to limited resources so care must be taken when selecting the projects to build. <br /> After all possible projects are identified, those deemed most likely to yield significant organizational benefits, given available resources, are selected for subsequent development. <br /> Some possible evaluation criteria for ranking potential projects are: strategic alignment, potential benefits, potential costs and resource availability, project size and duration, and technical difficulty. <br />
  • An organization can only work on only a limited number of projects at a given time due to limited resources so care must be taken when selecting the projects to build. <br /> After all possible projects are identified, those deemed most likely to yield significant organizational benefits, given available resources, are selected for subsequent development. <br /> Some possible evaluation criteria for ranking potential projects are: strategic alignment, potential benefits, potential costs and resource availability, project size and duration, and technical difficulty. <br />
  • An organization can only work on only a limited number of projects at a given time due to limited resources so care must be taken when selecting the projects to build. <br /> After all possible projects are identified, those deemed most likely to yield significant organizational benefits, given available resources, are selected for subsequent development. <br /> Some possible evaluation criteria for ranking potential projects are: strategic alignment, potential benefits, potential costs and resource availability, project size and duration, and technical difficulty. <br />
  • An organization can only work on only a limited number of projects at a given time due to limited resources so care must be taken when selecting the projects to build. <br /> After all possible projects are identified, those deemed most likely to yield significant organizational benefits, given available resources, are selected for subsequent development. <br /> Some possible evaluation criteria for ranking potential projects are: strategic alignment, potential benefits, potential costs and resource availability, project size and duration, and technical difficulty. <br />

Mis1 Mis1 Presentation Transcript

  • Information SystemsInformation Systems www.StudsPlanet.com
  • OutlineOutline Definitions Types of Information Systems Information Systems Vs Information Technology Expanding Roles of IS Classification of IS Information Systems Development Information systems: Opportunities and Challenges Conclusion www.StudsPlanet.com
  • DefinitionsDefinitionsData Raw facts such as an employee’s name and number of hours worked in a week, inventory part numbers or sales orders. Information A collection of facts organized in such a way that they have additional value beyond the value of the facts themselves. Data Information Rs 35,000 12 Units Rs 12,000 Jayesh Western Region Rs 100,000 100 Units 35 Units Data Processing Salesperson: Jayesh Sales Territory: Western Region Current Sales: 147 Units = Rs147,000www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Information Systems An information system(IS) is typically considered to be a set of interrelated elements or components that collect(input), manipulate(processes), and disseminate (output) data and information and provide a feedback mechanism to meet an objective. Open System Close System Definitions www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Types of Information SystemsTypes of Information Systems 1. Informal Information System 2. Formal Information System www.StudsPlanet.com
  • An Information System is an organized combination of people, hardware, software, communication networks and the data resources that collects, transforms and disseminates information in a organization. Computer-based Information System www.StudsPlanet.com
  • INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Hardware Software Databases Networks Other related components are used to build INFORMATION SYSTEMS Payroll System Inventory System Marketing System Customer Service System IS Vs ITIS Vs IT www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Classification of ISClassification of IS Information Systems Operations Support System Management Support System Transaction processing systems Process control systems Office automation systems Management information systems Decision support systems Executive information systems www.StudsPlanet.com
  • 1. Operations support systems process data generated by business operations Major categories are: i) Transaction processing systems ii) Process control systems iii) Office automation systems 2. Management Support Systems provide information and support needed for effective decision making by managers Major categories are i) Management Information System ii) Decision Support Systems iii) Executive Information System www.StudsPlanet.com
  • 1. Operations Support System i) Transaction processing systems • Process business exchanges • Maintain records about the exchanges • Handle routine, yet critical, tasks • Perform simple calculations ii) Process control systems monitor and control industrial processes. iii) Office automation systems automate office procedures and enhance office communications and productivity. www.StudsPlanet.com
  • 2. Management support systems provide information and support needed for effective decision making by managers Major categories are: i) Management information systems  Routine information for routine decisions  Operational efficiency  Use transaction data as main input  Databases integrate MIS in different functional areas www.StudsPlanet.com
  • ii) Decision Support System • Interactive support for non-routine decisions or problems • End-users are more involved in creating a DSS than an MIS iii) Executive information systems provide critical information tailored to the information needs of executives www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Other categories a) Expert systems b) End user computing systems c) Business information systems d) Strategic information systems a) Expert Systems are knowledge-based systems that provides expert advice and act as expert consultants to the users b) End user computing systems support the direct, hands on use of computers by end users for operational and managerial applications c) Business information systems support the operational and managerial applications of the basic business functions of a firm d) Strategic information systems provide a firm which strategic products, services, and capabilities for competitive advantage www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Functional BusinessFunctional Business Information SystemsInformation Systems Production Operations Production Operations MarketingMarketing Human Resource Management Human Resource Management FinanceFinanceAccountingAccounting Functional Business Systems www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Marketing InformationMarketing Information SystemsSystems Marketing Information Systems Marketing Information Systems Interactive Marketing Sales Force Automation Sales Force Automation Customer Relationship Management Customer Relationship Management Sales Management Sales Management Market Research and Forecasting Market Research and Forecasting Advertising and Promotions Advertising and Promotions Product Management Product Management www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Interactive marketingInteractive marketing Interactive marketing: – A customer-focused marketing process – Using the Internet, intranets, and extranets – To establish two-transactions – Between a company and its customers or potential customers Goal: – to profitably attract and keep customers – who will become partners with the business – in creating, purchasing and improving productswww.StudsPlanet.com
  • Targeted MarketingTargeted Marketing An advertising and promotion management concept that includes five targeting components
  • Targeted MarketingTargeted Marketing ComponentsComponents  Community – customize advertising to appeal to people of specific virtual communities  Content – advertising placed on a variety of selected websites aimed at a specific audience  Context – advertising placed on web pages that are relevant to the content of a product or service  Demographic/Psychographic – web marketing efforts aimed at specific types or classes or people  Online Behavior – promotion efforts tailored to each visit to a site by an individual, e.g., using cookies files www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Sales Force AutomationSales Force Automation Outfit sales force with notebook computers, web browsers and sales contract management software Connect them to marketing websites and company intranet Goal: – Increase personal productivity – Speeds up capture and analysis of sales data from the field to marketing managerswww.StudsPlanet.com
  • Manufacturing InformationManufacturing Information SystemsSystems Engineering Systems •CAD •CAE •Computer- Aided Process Planning Manufacturing Execution Systems •Shop Floor •Scheduling •Machine Control •Process Control •Robotic Control Computer Integrated Manufacturing Manufacturing Resource Planning •Production Forecasting •Production Scheduling •Quality Control Remote Worker Supplier Extranet Intranet www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Manufacturing InformationManufacturing Information SystemsSystems Support the production/operations function Includes all activities concerned with planning and control of producing goods or services www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Human ResourceHuman Resource ManagementManagement •Manpower Planning •Labor Force Tracking •Labor Cost Analysis •Turnover Analysis •Recruitment •Workforce Planning •Skill assessment •Performance evaluation •Payroll control •Benefits Administration •Compensation effectiveness •Benefits Analysis •Contract costing •Salary forecast •Succession planning •Performance appraisal plans •Training effectiveness •Career matching Staffing Training & Development Compensation Administration Strategic Systems Tactical Systems Operationa l Systems www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Human Resource Management (HRM)Human Resource Management (HRM) Information systems designed to support – Planning to meet the personnel needs of the business – Development of employees to their full potential – Control of all personnel policies and programs www.StudsPlanet.com
  • HRM and the InternetHRM and the Internet Recruiting employees using the corporate website and commercial recruiting services Posting messages in selected Internet newsgroups Communicating with job applicants via e- mail www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Accounting InformationAccounting Information SystemsSystems www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Accounting Information SystemsAccounting Information Systems Record and report the flow of funds through an organization Produce financial statements Forecasts of future conditions www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Financial ManagementFinancial Management SystemsSystems Support business managers and professionals in decisions concerning – The financing of a business – The allocation and control of financial resources within a business www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Financial Management System ExamplesFinancial Management System Examples Financial Information Systems Financial Information Systems Financial Planning Financial Planning Cash Management Investment Management Investment Management Capital Budgeting www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Information Systems DevelopmentInformation Systems Development www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC) - describes the life of an information system from conception to retirement. 1. System identification, selection, and planning 2. System analysis 3. System design 4. System implementation 5. System maintenance Steps in the SystemsSteps in the Systems Development ProcessDevelopment Process www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Phase 1: System Identification, Selection, and Planning – Undertake only those projects critical to mission, goals, and objectives – Select a development project from all possible projects that could be performed – Different evaluation criteria used to rank potential projects Steps in the Systems Development Process www.StudsPlanet.com
  •  Phase 1: System Identification, Selection, and Planning – Evaluation criteria  Strategic alignment: The extent to which the project is viewed as helping the organization achieve its strategic objectives an d long-term goal.  Potential benefits: The extent to which the project is viewed as improving profits, customer service, and the duration of the benefits  Potential costs and resource availability: The number and types of resources the project requires and their availability  Project size / duration: The number of individuals and the length of time needed to complete the project  Technical difficulty / risks: The level of technical difficulty involved to complete the project within a given time and resources Steps in the Systems Development Process www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Phase 2: System Analysis – Collecting System Requirements: Requirement collection is process of gathering and organizing information from users, managers, business processes, an documents to understand how a proposed system should work  System analysts use a variety of techniques to collect system requirements – Interviews: analysts interview people – Questionnaires: analysts design and administer surveys. – Observations: analysts observe workers at selected times – Document analysis: analysts study business documents  Critical Success Factors (CSF): analysts ask each person to define her own personal CSFs.  Joint Application Design (JAD): Special type of a group meeting where all users and analysts meet at the same time Steps in the Systems Development Process www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Phase 2: System Analysis – Modeling Organizational Data: To construct an information system, systems analysts must understand what data the information system needs in order to accomplish the intended tasks. To do this they use data modeling tools to collect and describe data to users.  Entity Relationship Diagram (ERD) – Modeling Organizational Processes and Logic  Data flows  Processing logic Steps in the Systems Development Process www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Phase 3: System Design – Designing forms and reports – Designing interfaces and dialogues – Designing databases and files – Designing processing and logic Steps in the Systems Development Process www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Phase 4: System Implementation – Software programming – Software testing  Developmental: Programmers test the correctness of individual modules and the integration of multiple modules  Alpha: Software tester tests whether it meets design specifications  Beta: Actual system users test the capability of the system in the user environment with actual data Steps in the Systems Development Process www.StudsPlanet.com
  •  Phase 4: System Implementation – System conversion  Parallel  Direct  Phased  Pilot – System documentation, training, and support  User and reference guides  Training and tutorials  Installation procedures and troubleshooting guides Steps in the Systems Development Process www.StudsPlanet.com
  •  Phase 5: System Maintenance – Maintenance process steps: 1. Obtain maintenance request 2. Transform requests into changes 3. Design changes 4. Implement changes Steps in the Systems Development Process www.StudsPlanet.com
  •  Phase 5: System Maintenance – Maintenance types: 1. Corrective maintenance 2. Adaptive maintenance 3. Perfective maintenance 4. Preventive maintenance Steps in the Systems Development Process www.StudsPlanet.com
  • www.StudsPlanet.com
  • The basic information systems required by organizations to coordinate worldwide trade and other activities International Information Systems ArchitectureInternational Information Systems Architecture International information systems architecture: A force in the environment to which businesses must respond and that influences the direction of the business Business driver: www.StudsPlanet.com
  • International Information Systems Architecture THE GROWTH OF INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS www.StudsPlanet.com
  • The Global Environment: Business Drivers and ChallengesThe Global Environment: Business Drivers and Challenges The global business drivers can be divided into two groups: THE GROWTH OF INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS Global communication and transportation technologies Development of global culture General cultural factors: www.StudsPlanet.com
  • THE GROWTH OF INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS Emergence of global social norms Political stability Global knowledge base General Cultural Factors: (Continued) www.StudsPlanet.com
  • THE GROWTH OF INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS Global markets Global production and operations Global coordination Global workforce Global economies of scale Specific business factors: www.StudsPlanet.com
  • THE GROWTH OF INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS Business Challenges Cultural particularism: Regionalism, nationalism, language differences Social expectations: Brand-name expectations, work hours Political laws: Transborder data and privacy laws, commercial regulations General: www.StudsPlanet.com
  • THE GROWTH OF INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS Standards: Different Electronic Data Interchange (EDI), telecommunications standards Reliability: Phone networks not uniformly reliable Speed: Different data transfer speeds, many slower than United States Personnel: Shortages of skilled consultants Specific: www.StudsPlanet.com
  • ORGANIZING INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS Three kinds of organizational structure: Centralized (in the home country) Decentralized (to local foreign units) Coordinated (all units participate as equals) Global Strategies and Business Organization www.StudsPlanet.com
  • ORGANIZING INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS Heavy centralization of corporate activities in the home country of origin Domestic exporter strategy: Centralized financial management and control while decentralizing production, sales, and marketing operations to units in other countries Multinational strategy: www.StudsPlanet.com
  • ORGANIZING INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS The product is financed and initially produced in the home country, but for product-specific reasons rely on foreign personnel for further production, marketing, and human resources. Franchisers: The value-adding activities are managed from a global perspective without reference to national borders, optimizing sources of supply and demand wherever they appear, and taking advantage of any local competitive advantages. Transnational strategy: www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Global Systems to Fit the StrategyGlobal Systems to Fit the Strategy Global Strategy and Systems Configurations ORGANIZING INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Management Information SystemsManagement Information Systems Chapter 16 Managing International Information SystemsChapter 16 Managing International Information Systems 1. Centralized systems: Systems development and operation occur totally at the domestic home base. 2. Duplicated systems: Development occurs at the home base but operations are handed over to autonomous units in foreign locations. Four types of systems configuration: ORGANIZING INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS www.StudsPlanet.com
  • 3. Decentralized systems: Each foreign unit designs its own unique solutions and systems. 4. Networked systems: Systems development and operations occur in an integrated and coordinated fashion across all units. ORGANIZING INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS Four types of systems configuration: (Continued) www.StudsPlanet.com
  • ORGANIZING INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS Organize value-adding activities along lines of comparative advantage Develop and operate systems units at each level of corporate activity —regional, national, and international Establish at world headquarters Reorganizing the Business To develop a global company and information systems support structure: www.StudsPlanet.com
  • MANAGING GLOBAL SYSTEMS Agreeing on common user requirements Introducing changes in business processes Coordinating applications development Coordinating software releases Encouraging local users to support global systems Management Challenges in Developing Global Systems Table 16-4www.StudsPlanet.com
  • MANAGING GLOBAL SYSTEMS Define the core business processes: Conduct workflow analysis, identify centers of excellence for these processes Identify the core systems to coordinate centrally: Conquer the core systems and define these systems as truly transnational Choose an approach: Incremental, Grand Design, Evolutionary Make the Benefits Clear Global Systems Strategy www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Local, Regional, and Global SystemsLocal, Regional, and Global Systems MANAGING GLOBAL SYSTEMS www.StudsPlanet.com
  • TECHNOLOGY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS Computing platforms and systems integration: Develop global, distributed, and integrated systems to support digital business processes spanning national boundaries Use of same hardware and operating system does not guarantee integration. Establish data and technical standards Technology Challenges of Global Systems www.StudsPlanet.com
  • TECHNOLOGY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS Overcoming disparate national technical standards, data exchange restrictions and service levels User of Internet technology to create global intranets, extranets, virtual private networks (VPNs) Connectivity: Technology Challenges of Global Systems (Continued) www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Internet Population in Selected Countries TECHNOLOGY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS www.StudsPlanet.com
  • TECHNOLOGY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS Cost of new interface designs Integrating new systems with old User interface design Differences in language and conventions Software: Unique challenges for application software: www.StudsPlanet.com
  • TECHNOLOGY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS Outsourcing portions of new systems like development work or maintenance of existing systems to external vendors in another country Offshore software outsourcing: Managing Global Software DevelopmentManaging Global Software Development www.StudsPlanet.com
  • TECHNOLOGY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS Contract cost Vendor selection costs Transition management and knowledge transfer costs Domestic human resources costs Major cost components of offshore software development: www.StudsPlanet.com
  • TECHNOLOGY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS Costs of improving software development processes Costs of adjusting to cultural differences Cost of managing an offshore contract Major cost components of offshore software development: (Continued) www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Total Cost of Outsourcing TECHNOLOGY ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS www.StudsPlanet.com
  • MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES, CHALLENGES, AND SOLUTIONS Management Opportunities: Ability to lower costs through global scale economies by building international systems for producing and selling goods and services in different regions of the world www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Finding the right global business strategy Difficulties of managing change in a multicultural firm Difficulties of achieving global connectivity and integration Management Challenges: MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES, CHALLENGES, AND SOLUTIONS www.StudsPlanet.com
  • Agreeing on common user requirements Introducing changes in business processes Coordinating applications development Coordinating software releases Encouraging local users to support global systems Solution Guidelines: MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES, CHALLENGES, AND SOLUTIONS www.StudsPlanet.com