Shaping the Future: Synchronous Learning Environments Across the Campus, Across the World

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Halford Haskell, Professor of Classics, and Thomas Howe, Professor of Art History, Southwestern University; Kenny Morrell, Associate Professor of Classics, Rhodes College …

Halford Haskell, Professor of Classics, and Thomas Howe, Professor of Art History, Southwestern University; Kenny Morrell, Associate Professor of Classics, Rhodes College

The development of critical thinking through synchronous interaction among students and faculty is indispensable to the identities and missions of residential liberal arts institutions. Yet the increasing abundance of digital materials poses questions about the role of asynchronous instruction. We discuss new virtual, shared spaces and ways of shaping these spaces to expand curricular possibilities while maintaining our intimate environments, citing specific, evolving models within Sunoikisis, an inter-institutional initiative in the field of classics.

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  • Shared spaces, extended spaces. As TELEmachos was very much into information sharing across distance (he was trying to get intel on father)….Students/faculty exposed to broader academic engagement and evaluation.Mid-90’s, to extend space, leverage opportunities of collaboration; ACS Tech Ctr.; 2 time zones.
  • Result was Sunoikisis
  • Generous support MellonOrig.ACS, housed within NITLE (broader constituency) and now CHS
  • Sunoikisis name ; > mission
  • Just so Sunoikisis
  • Professional development / opportunities, students AND facultyHacımusalar; Kencreai
  • Student to student; student to faculty collaborationfaculty development
  • Development of synchronous teaching and learning methodologies across distances; ACS dev. an lms for us; various iterations of better tech.Also asynchronous engagement student to faculty, student to student
  • Development of synchronous teaching and learning methodologies across distances; ACS dev. an lms for us; various iterations of better tech.Also asynchronous engagement student to faculty, student to student
  • Professional development: course dev. seminars; need to get together
  • expanded to Latin and Greek,
  • Greekul,
  • Latin, and elem. Grk sequence
  • Expanded space, also get together

Transcript

  • 1. Shaping the Future: Shaping the Environments Synchronous Learning Future: Synchronous Campus, AcrossEnvironments Across the Learning the World Across the Campus, Across the World HalfordHaskell Southwestern University Thomas Howe Southwestern University;FondazioneRestoring Ancient Stabiae Kenny Morrell Center for Hellenic Studies Telemachos and Penelope Attic redfigure skyphos, Chiusi, Penelope Painter
  • 2. Shaping the Future: Synchronous Learning Environments Across the Campus, Across the WorldAssociated Colleges of the South Tele Telemachos and Penelope 1990’s >> Attic redfigure skyphos, Chiusi, Penelope Painter
  • 3. Shaping the Future: Synchronous Learning Environments Across the Campus, Across the WorldAssociated Colleges of the South Telemachos and Penelope Attic redfigure skyphos, Chiusi, Penelope Painter
  • 4. Shaping the Future: Synchronous Learning Environments Across the Campus, Across the WorldAssociated Colleges of the SouthMellon FoundationNITLE Telemachos and PenelopeCenter for Hellenic Studies Attic redfigure skyphos, Chiusi, Penelope Painter
  • 5. Shaping the Future: Synchronous Learning Environments Across the Campus, Across the WorldAssociated Colleges of the South Thucydides (5th BCE): alliance of individual city-states for a common purpose
  • 6. Shaping the Future: Synchronous Learning Environments Across the Campus, Across the World Sunoikisis seeks to develop a set ofAssociated Colleges of the South common goals and achieve a degree of success and prominence that goes beyond the capacity of a single campus program.
  • 7. Shaping the Future: Synchronous Learning Environments Across the Campus, Across the World•Archaeological Field School Opportunities • Hacımusalar, Lycia, Turkey • Kenchreai, Greece
  • 8. Shaping the Future: Synchronous Learning Environments Across the Campus, Across the World•Archaeological Field School Opportunities • Hacımusalar, Lycia, Turkey • Kenchreai, Greece
  • 9. Shaping the Future: Synchronous Learning Environments Across the Campus, Across the World•Archaeological Field School Opportunities • Hacımusalar, Lycia, Turkey • Kenchreai, Greece 1999 Synchronous classes •faculty teaching within expertise •discussion during class, with faculty modelling
  • 10. Shaping the Future: Synchronous Learning Environments Across the Campus, Across the World•Archaeological Field School Opportunities • Hacımusalar, Lycia, Turkey • Kenchreai, Greece Asynchronous exchanges Synchronous classes •faculty teaching within expertise •discussion during class, with faculty modelling
  • 11. Shaping the Future: Synchronous Learning Environments Across the Campus, Across the World•Archaeological Field School Opportunities • Hacımusalar, Lycia, Turkey • Kenchreai, Greece
  • 12. Shaping the Future: Synchronous Learning Environments Across the Campus, Across the World•Archaeological Field School Opportunities•Latin and Greek courses
  • 13. Shaping the Future: Synchronous Learning Environments Across the Campus, Across the World•Archaeological Field School Opportunities•Latin and Greek coursesUpper level Greek Sequence• Homeric Poetry• Lyric Poetry• Comedy• 4th Century Literature• Hellenistic Literature
  • 14. Shaping the Future: Synchronous Learning Environments Across the Campus, Across the World•Archaeological Field School Opportunities•Latin and Greek coursesUpper level Greek Sequence Upper level Latin Sequence• Homeric Poetry • Early Republic• Lyric Poetry • Late Republic• Comedy • Neronian Period• 4th Century Literature • Imperial Period 70-180 CE• Hellenistic Literature • Late Antiquity/Medieval Elementary Greek (Fall 2012)
  • 15. Shaping the Future: Synchronous Learning Environments Across the Campus, Across the World•Archaeological Field School Opportunities•Latin and Greek courses•Undergraduate Research Symposium
  • 16. Shaping the Future: Synchronous Learning Environments Across the Campus, Across the World•Archaeological Field School Opportunities•Latin and Greek courses•Undergraduate Research Symposium•Study “Abroad”
  • 17. Shaping the Future: Synchronous Learning Environments Across the Campus, Across the World•Archaeological Field School Opportunities•Latin and Greek courses•Undergraduate Research Symposium•Study “Abroad”•Student Internships
  • 18. Saving Study Abroad Through Synchronous Distance Learning:? Linking Three Institutions: The National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education; Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas; The Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation, Italy Naples Oplontis Herculaneum Pompeii The Villas of Ancient Stabiae W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 19. The Challenge:-Liberal Arts Colleges in the U.S. produce about 4% of all graduates, butalso a disproportionate number of professional leaders.-It is a very expensive type of education (usually), particularly because itdemands a low teacher-student ratio, and close interaction of goodteacher-professors and students in small classes.-in the last ten years, many more students have entered internationalcareers, and therefore foreign experience and language education havebecome essential to the value of a liberal arts education. (Now, includingChina…)-small colleges (well, all colleges, and students) in the U.S. are understringent financial stress, and study abroad is expensive, and interruptsincreasingly complicated majors. . W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 20. The Challenge:-Is Synchronous Distance learning capable of reconstructing the intimateand immediate interaction of the classroom of small Liberal ArtsColleges?-Can it work internationally? W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 21. The overseas institutional partner: The Vesuvian Institute of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation:a multi-functioning research and study center on the Bay of Naples. W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 22. Cumae Baiae Neapolis Ischia Misenum (Naples) Herculaneum Puteoli Oplontis Pompeii StabiaeThe prime mission of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation:To construct and maintain a large archaeological park on the site ofthe ancient Roman villas of Stabiae, 4 km from Pompeii.Stabiae is the largest concentration of well-preserved enormous seasidevillas in the entire Mediterranean. W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 23. Buried in the same eruption that buried Pompeii in A.D. 79 Baiae Puteoli W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 24. W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 25. Villa San Marco, Reconstruction Model, Albert Bui, Caitlin Allday, April Martin, Southwestern .UniversityVilla San Marco, Upper Peristyle, digital reconstruction, RAS/Capasso, 2004 W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 26. W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 27. Digital reconstruction: RAS/Capware, 2004 W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 28. Archaeological Park at the Site of Stabiae:-site with a coherent character Site of the-create concentration activities on the site Vesuvian-seven minute access from Pompei InstituteRAS/Tom Leader Studios/LVarone X Excavation: Villa Arianna, And On-site museum? Commuter rail station and Funicular to Park X Excavation: Villa San Marco X Projected global budget: c. euro 140 million, First visitors’ center W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 29. Management Structure: changing world archaeologytoward sustainable, shared management of major sites-Master Plan 2001-The Legal Structure of the Foundation (2002)consists of international board representationfrom:-The Superintendancy of Archaeology of Pompei (Prof. P.G. Guzzo)-The School of Architecture of the University of Maryland (Prof. Matthew Bell)-The Committee of Stabiae Reborn, Castellammare di Stabia (Notaio F. Spagnuolo)Coordinator General: Prof. Thomas HoweA non-profit cultural institution in Italy as the first foundation of its type created under a 1998 law whichallows for the creation of a new type of semi-public, semi-private institution which can both receive andspend both state and private funds, from Italy and abroad.-R.A.S. incorporation in the U.S., 2005 (Washington, D.C.), non-profit 501-3c-Contratto di Sponsorizazzione, Jan. 2006. Gives RAS the concession to coordinate all otherinstitutions on the site for execution of Master Plan.Global Budget: €140 million, 2/3 provided by the Region of Campania if 1/3 can be found by RASFoundation W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 30. 1999 TNHVilla San Marco, May, 2009 First conceptual sketch of excavation area with descending ramp to Roman street, June 1999 (TNH) W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 31. Villa San MarcoExcavations of the Superintendancy2007-2008:Dot.sa Giovanna Bonfacio, site directorexcavation directors:Dott. Fabrizio RuffoDott. Gennaro IovinoGeom. E. Sabini, site supervisor Mar. 2008 W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 32. Nov. 2008 W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 33. Villa Arianna, Great Peristyle court (108 m. long), garden surface of A.D. 79,Revealed June-July, 2007 W W W . S T A B I A E . O R GExcavations conducted by the Superintendancy of Pompei, Dr. Giovanna Bonifacio, site director, geom. Enzo Sabini,excavation supervisor; field drawings, summer, 2007, Profs. Lindley Vann, Ian Sutherland, and UMd Students.
  • 34. W W W . S T A B I A E . O R GJune, 2008
  • 35. The Visitors’ Center:A “Private” Building on a public siteVisitors’ services under RAS management. May, 2009 W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 36. Four-Year Traveling U.S. Tour:“In Stabiano: Exploring the Ancient Seaside Villas of the Roman Elite” NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., April 27-Oct. 24, 2004 ARKANSAS ART CENTER, Little Rock, AR January 28 – April 14, 2005 NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART, Reno, NE October 7 2005 – Jan 5, 2006 SAN DIEGO MUSEUM OF ART, San Diego, CA February 18 – May 14, 2006 MICHAEL C. CARLOS, EMORY U., Atlanta, GA August – October, 2006 TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART, Toledo, OH Nov. 11, 2006, Jan. 28, 2007 CHAZEN MUSEUM OF ART, U. WISCONSIN, Madison, WI March 17 – June 3, 2007 DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART, Dallas, TX July 8 – October 7, 2007THE CUMMER MUSEUM OF ART & GARDENS, Jacksonville, FL November 7, 2007 - Feb 3, 2008 W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 37. HERMITAGE STATE MUSEUMS, HONG KONG MUSEUM OF ART St. Petersburg, (18 Jul - 5 Oct 2008) Dec. 7, 2007-March 30, 2008 W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 38. The Vesuvian International Institute for Archaeology and Humanities of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae FoundationJune 15, 2007 Open for InternationalEducational Groups-A former Salesian College-A residential center for undergraduate and graduate internationalprograms for students and researchers in archaeology, medieval,Renaissance and Baroque art and history, History of Opera,Neapolitan folk music, architecture, etc.…-Hosting academic credit programs from study abroad centers-Accredited programs in language, culture, archaeology, arthistory. W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 39. Avibrant international study and research center, not a“ghetto-like” study abroad residence hall W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 40. The Facilities Circumvesuviana Rail station 90 bedrooms chapel Mensa/Dining room lobby Playing Fields, parking W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G Two theaters
  • 41. The athletic facilities to the rear: the “bad” view. W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 42. Close connections to the culturalproperties of the Bay of Naples, witheasy transportation W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 43. A repertoire of localconsultants who canoffer events or modulesto be inserted intoaccredited courses W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 44. A repertoire of localconsultants who can offerevents or modules to beinserted into accreditedcourses W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 45. A local, innovativecultural and researchinstitution in the center ofan area a large range ofpotential curricularmaterial:-Modern language (Italian, Latin,Arabic and Spanish)-Classical Archaeology, historyand art history-Medieval archaeology and arthistory-Early Christian-Environmental studies-Cultural properties management-Opera, folk music, commediadell’arte-food history and cuisine-geology-art instruction (drawingphotography, painting), W W W . S T A B I A E . O R Garchitectural instruction.
  • 46. NITLE Activities with Telepresence Pedagogy London/Southwestern StudentAlumni Class Audit Bridge W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G NITLE Network Exploration
  • 47. Time zones, seven hour difference, five hour overlap of the working day8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 08:00 09:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 48. The Main Classroom, The Distant Classroomwith professor Camera of professor and classroom Screen with students and prof. camera from main classroom Lecture screen Screen with distant students Lecture screen Small distant group Large distant group W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 49. The Main Classroom, Camera of professorwith professor (c. 25) and classroom Screen with camera distant students Lecture screen Lecture screen W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 50. Screen with students and prof. The Distant Classroom camera from main classroomLecturescreenSmall distantgroup Large distant group W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 51. The requirements for facilities and spaces:The Main Classroom: The Distant classroom:Small-college classrooms, c. 25-30; small “cubicles” for 1-6 students?Other MainClassroomsStandard smallcollegeclassrooms formain class (c.25) Students at Stabia taking several classes from home campus Distant groups at one or multiple institutions W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 52. Home College, USA ITALYIndividual or small groups of Italy: courses projected fromstudents takings courses from classrooms, archaeological sites,Italy (e.g. Italian language, fieldtripsarchaeology, art history) atseveral collegesCourses at students homeuniversities which allowindividual students abroad to Individual or small groupscontinue following their of students in Italysequence of required courses participating in telepresence in classes at home Univ. W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 53. Digitally [partly] solving the library problem:Much bibliography in the humanities is rather old and therefore essentialbooks are often out of print, making it almost impossible for anew studyabroad center to start an effective teaching library. Digital libraryservices and e-books may make it possible partly to solve this. W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 54. Three types of synchronous distance learning which won’twork: Antipasto W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 55. Three types of synchronous distance learning which won’twork: Primo W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 56. Three types of synchronous distance learning which won’twork: Secondo W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G
  • 57. The Vesuvian International Institute for Archaeology and HumanitiesJune 15, 2007 Open for InternationalEducational Groups-A former Salesian College-A residential center for undergraduate and graduateinternational programs for students and researchers inarchaeology, medieval, Renaissance and Baroque artand history, History of Opera, Neapolitan folk music,architecture, etc.…-Hosting academic credit programs from study abroadcenters-Accredited programs in language, culture,archaeology, art history. W W W . S T A B I A E . O R G