Search for Originality: Tools for Teaching
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Search for Originality: Tools for Teaching

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  • Welcome to this NITLE Shared Academics TM event. SEAN: As participants are coming in, welcome them and encourage audience members to say hello in chat by indicating who they are and what institutions they are from. Today’s participants represent 32 colleges . Personal Computer Participants: Say hello in chat. HD Discussants: Say hello via video.
  • As a benefit of membership, NITLE Shared Academics TM offers members of The NITLE Network access to expert presenters without incurring the travel costs of bringing them to their individual campuses while additionally enabling them to be in a virtual classroom with colleagues at other institutions. This platform allows for a high level of engagement much like you would find in a classroom at one of our institutions.
  • We want to thank our sponsor Turnitin who have made it possible for us to invite today’s speaker Kelly McBride to present to The NITLE Network. We have Jason Chu from Turnitin sitting in today’s session as an HD Discussant. Jason is participating from Oakland, CA. (Invite Jason to say hello.)
  • There are two ways to participate in this event. Those schools certified by NITLE to participate as HD Discussants will be able to ask questions and make comments via video. We have three reminders for our HD Discussants. Mute your microphone when not conversing. When talking, look into your video camera. Speak the words, “[your institution] with a question” then wait for the moderator to acknowledge you. Welcome to our HD Discussant campuses : Bowdoin, Schreiner and Union . Our second category of participants are our Audience Members . Those of you accessing this event through a personal computer may use the chat box to interact with other audience members or to pose questions to the event moderator. Identify yourself by name and institution when you use the chat system. Example: Sean@NITLE: Here’s another resource … We welcome everyone to use Twitter to contribute to the discussion, ask questions or pass along what you find valuable. Use hashtags #turnitinoriginal and #nitle. We will stop an several intervals to ask for questions, but please feel free to ask questions and share insights. CHAT NITLE: Audience members, ask questions, share thoughts here. NITLE: Identify your name and/or school. NITLE: Twitter hashtags - #nitle #turnitinoriginal TWITTER #NITLE Shared Academics event In Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching has begun. Welcome! http://www.nitle.org/live/events/158-in-search-of-originality-tools-for-teaching #turnitinoriginal
  • NITLE Shared Academics TM is pleased to welcome our speaker Kelly McBride. Kelly is joining us from St. Petersberg, FL. Today’s speaker meets us at the intersection of teaching, technology, integrity and democracy. Kelly McBride is a writer, teacher and one of the country’s leading voices when it comes to media ethics. She has been on the faculty of The Poynter Institute for eight years. Poynter exists to ensure that our communities have access to excellent journalism—the kind of journalism that enables us to participate fully and effectively in our democracy. Whether working with the media or faculty, Kelly’s aim is to identify the tools and techniques that lead to original writing. The world’s largest newsrooms, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, CNN, NPR and the BBC, frequently quote her expertise. bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri master’s degree in theology from Gonzaga University gained a national reputation as a religion reporter, covering the moral side of fertility issues, sexual orientation, evolution and the Catholic Church’s abuse scandal recently traveled to South Africa to teach and research storytelling on mobile phones current work involves Poynter’s Sense-Making Project, a Ford Foundation project examining the transformation of journalism from a profession of a few to a civic obligation of many, the effects of technology on democracy, and the media habits of the millennial generation. Kelly, welcome. TURN OVER REMOTE TO KELLY. CHAT NITLE: Kelly is Senior Faculty, Ethics, Reporting and Writing at Poynter - http://www.poynter.org TWITTER #NITLE Network is eager to hear @kellymcb, Senior Faculty at Poynter - http://www.poynter.org #turnitinoriginal
  • KELLY begins.
  • CHAT NITLE: Who are some of the original thinkers and writers you admire? TWITTER Who are the original thinkers and writers you follow? #turnitinoriginal #nitle SEAN watches to see if there are any interesting ones mentioned and offer them to Kelly before Slide 15.
  • TWITTER Kelly McBride - The opposite of plagiarism is intellectual honesty. #nitle #turnitinoriginal
  • SEAN introduces Jason Chu and asks what trends they are seeing at Turnitin. If Jason mentions research paper here, GH will post in CHAT and Twitter: CHAT http://pages.turnitin.com/DevelopingStrategiesHE.html TWITTER Resource from @turnitin. http://pages.turnitin.com/DevelopingStrategiesHE.html #nitle
  • TIME MARKER :15 CHAT NITLE: How would you define intellectual honesty? TWITTER What is your definition of intellectual honesty? #turnitinoriginal #nitle SEAN: TAKE HD QUESTIONS and COMMENTS SEAN: Share any interesting CHAT responses with Kelly.
  • CHAT NITLE: Ways to encourage students to socially engage with academic work? TWITTER What social engagement might encourage students to describe their academic work? #turnitinoriginal #nitle
  • Digital natives
  • CHAT NITLE: How do you get students to talk about writing? TWITTER How do you get students to talk about their writing? #turnitinoriginal #nitle TAKE HD QUESTIONS and COMMENTS SEAN: Share any interesting CHAT responses with Kelly.
  • TIME MARKER :25
  • CHAT NITLE: Other warning signs? TWITTER What warning signs signal unoriginal work? #nitle #turnitinoriginal
  • TIME MARKER :45 CHAT NITLE: How do you get students to talk about writing? ASK for HD QUESTIONS and COMMENTS SEAN: Share any interesting CHAT responses with Kelly. SEAN: Take last question.
  • CHAT NITLE: http://kellymcbride.com TWITTER To learn more about today’s speaker: http://kellymcbride.com
  • Additional Resources CHAT NITLE: Share any resources you find valuable.
  • We encourage you to continue these discussions on your campus.
  • Please join us for these upcoming events and stay connected with NITLE through Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. We continue to add Shared Academics events to our calendar.
  • We like to offer a final thank you to our Sponsor Turnitin. Jason, thank you for being here. We also thank members of The NITLE Network for contributing to today’s conversation. We will be sending you a follow-up survey. Your feedback helps us continually improve Shared Academics TM programming. Thank you. CHAT NITLE: Thank you to our sponsor, Turnitin. NITLE: Thank you for contributing to this Shared Academics event. TWITTER Thank you to our sponsor, @Turnitin. #nitle

Transcript

  • 1. With Thanks to Our Sponsor
  • 2. Participation TipsHigh Definition Discussants•Mute your microphone when not conversing.•When talking, look into your video camera.•Speak the words, “[your institution] with a question” then wait for the moderator toacknowledge you.Audience Members•Use the chat box to interact with other audience members or to pose questions tothe event moderator.•Identify yourself by name and institution when you use the chat system. Example: Sean@NITLE: Here’s another resource …Twitter•Use hashtags #turnitinoriginal and #nitle to contribute to the discussion.In Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 3. Searching for Originality: Tools for Teaching Kelly McBride, Poynter
  • 4. Objectives• Define originality• Creating overall expectations (culture)• Tools of originalityIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 5. Habits of original thinkers• Who are some of the best original thinkers of our time?• What do they do?In Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 6. Step 1: Identify original thinkers/writersIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 7. In Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 8. Step 2: What do original writers do?• Read• Write• Talk about things• How meaning gets madeIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 9. What is this?• Acts of literacy• Acts of civic engagement• Acts of scholarship• Acts of creativityIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 10. The opposite of plagiarism is intellectual honestyIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 11. Intellectual honesty• An individual takes full responsibility for his or her own academic progress – Understand and articulate expectations – Describe her own work path or journey – Recognize his academic strengths and weaknesses – Support ideas with data and research INTELLECTUAL HONESTY REQUIRES ACADEMIC SELF AWARENESSIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 12. This is foundation of academic honesty and… Writing is the embodiment of all academic workIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 13. What would you add to the definition of intellectual honesty?In Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 14. How do you teach that???• Build a culture – In a classroom – In a support setting (library, writing lab) – Throughout an institution • Mandatory formative classes, first semester/yearIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 15. How do you teach that???• Describe and discuss doing the work• Journal• In-class• One-on-one conversations• Facebook or other social mediaIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 16. Step 3: Create social opportunities to describe academic workIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 17. so, mrs. P sent back my biblgraphy and told me to do it right wut am i supposed to do? Just go here http://www.easybib.com/ I looked at these http://www.aresearchguide.com/12biblio.htm and made my page look lik them.In Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 18. she said i didnt punctuate right or space it right Jack, just go to that link and make your works cited look that htose works cited look at it carefully becayse there are lots of ,,, and “””” and … and (((())))) :-) my mom made my sister help me do mine cause i couldn’t do it right You ugys are spending waay to much time talking about this it doesn’t matter how you do it because therse no test on this you just have to to get it right for the paperIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 19. How do you get students to talk about writing?In Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 20. Tools of originalityIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 21. Top five reasons to plagiarize5. Really don’t care about learning/honesty4. Really don’t care about learning/honesty at this particular moment3. Don’t have the skills to do something else2. Source material is inadequate or beyond comprehension1. Waited too long to start the process and now I’m out of optionsIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 22. Five steps to research + writing1. Find good information2. Understand what the information says3. Tell someone else what the information says4. Write it down the way you tell someone5. Write down where you got the information, use quotes and commas.In Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 23. The goal of good information• To explain facts (Think history, science, current events)• To explore ideas (Politics, social issues)• To make arguments (Legal or legislative)• To ask questions (What don’t we know)In Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 24. Describe what you readIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 25. If you can’t do the next step, go back• Go back to step one and start over, you don’t have good information.• It’s not your fault.• The information you gathered is most likely badly written.In Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 26. Self-aware student: I’m looking for sources that describe what happened and argue in favor of public policies.In Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 27. Semi self-aware student: I’ll get a bunch of information, then I’ll figure out what this information does and determine what I can possibly write.In Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 28. Unaware student: I’ll take whatever Google gives me.In Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 29. 2. Understanding information• If it’s too hard, ask someone to explain it to you.• Look up the words you don’t know• Break down the sentences, find the subjects and the verbs. (If you can’t do that, then the material is too hard for you.)In Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 30. Practice in class, in groups• Use shared documents, slightly above your students’ ability• In small groups, read it paragraph by paragraph.• Take turns explaining, looking up words, diagramming sentences (subject/verb)In Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 31. 3. Discuss the reading in class/pairsIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 32. If you can’t do the next step, go back• Go back to step one and start over, you don’t have good information.• It’s not your fault.• The information you gathered is most likely badly written.In Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 33. 4. Write it down in conversational languageIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 34. Warning signs• Polished notes• Long, extensive notesIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 35. 5. Write down where you got itIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 36. Other strategies• Have all students work from shared material• Describe the writing process – Idea, research, focus, order, draft*• Have students describe where they are in the writing process Help! For Writers and Writing Tools By Roy Peter ClarkIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 37. Locating the conversation*• What is the current conversation about this topic?• What is your response to that?• How do “they” react to you?• What do you say back? *They Say, I Say By Gerald Graff and Cathy BirkensteinIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 38. What have you done to encourage writing with integrity?In Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 39. Kelly McBride Poynter. kmcbride@poynter.org www.kellymcbride.comIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 40. Resources• Article on Academic Integrity by NITLE Fellow Tracy Mitrano http://blogs.nitle.org/2012/10/29/academic-integrity/• Research Paper: Developing Strategies to Encourage Original Student Work http://pages.turnitin.com/DevelopingStrategiesHE.html• They Say, I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing by Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein• Help! For Writers and Writing Tools by Roy Peter ClarkIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 41. Discussion Guide for Your Campus• Who are our original thinkers in our own community? What can we learn from them?• Do we spend more energy combating plagiarism or teaching students how to be original?• How do the tools that Kelly McBride has described compare with the ones we use?• How do we currently share teaching tools and techniques that encourage originality?In Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 42. Upcoming Events• Chuck Henry on The Future of Liberal Connect with Us Arts College Library, February 6• Digital Pedagogy and MOOCification, February 26• Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, and Digital Humanities, February 27• Open Education and MOOCs, March 8• NITLE Summit and Symposium, April 15, Emory Conference Center, AtlantaIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by
  • 43. Thank YouIn Search of Originality: Tools for Teaching Sponsored by