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NITLE Lines of Inquiry 2013-2014
 

NITLE Lines of Inquiry 2013-2014

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Find out how NITLE can be a resource for you in the coming year and how your institution’s involvement in the NITLE Network is making a difference for liberal education. NITLE’s executive director ...

Find out how NITLE can be a resource for you in the coming year and how your institution’s involvement in the NITLE Network is making a difference for liberal education. NITLE’s executive director and staff members will share information about our 2013-2014 program agenda and introduce you to specific tools and resources that your institution can use to make the best possible strategic decisions about integrating pedagogy and technology.

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  • We all have pressures that we are up against every day. There are the urgent issues that have to be addressed today. Then there are the systemic issues that may be even more important to out futures, but they are hard, complex, multi-layered, tension-provoking and finding the time (or even the energy) to address proves challenging. Add in the speed of change, and it becomes mindboggling. We live in a constant state of addressing issues or solving problems. In that state, it is easy to lose sight of the outcomes we are seeking.Take just a moment and think about an issue you currently face at work. [PAUSE] It can be an individual issue, a group/department/division issue or an institutional issue. PAUSENow, what is the outcome you are seeking? You are welcome to type the outcome in chat. PAUSE Is it … ?DistinctionBetter RetentionHigher EnrollmentStudent SatisfactionA Sustainable Financial Model
  • At NITLE, the outcome we seek a NETWORK of …Higher education leaders making the best possible strategic decisions to ensure mission-driven integration of pedagogy and technology.
  • Our approach is Growing a knowledge network (each of you individually and institutionally possesses valuable knowledge; when dozens of institutions share their knowledge, they tap into the wisdom of the crowd.)Facilitating collaborative relationships, learning and projectsPrioritizing problemsDeveloping integrated strategies
  • So how do we get to that outcome … you ask the right questions and you focus your efforts on answering them. What are the right questions? When we listen to members of the NITLE Network, we hear lots of questions, questions about the future, questions about how technology can be used, questions about strategy. In listening to your conversations, your questions, your feedback, we’ve watched for common themes and overlapping questions. From all of that, five lines of inquiry have emerged.
  • As you can see, there are five inquiries that are shown here. Each can be explored through the lenses of Liberal Arts Mission and Practice, Emerging Information Technology, and Value and Sustainability. Let’s quickly go through them in a COUNTERCLOCKWISE direction. Starting at the top, we have How might we ensure our selection and use of digital technologies are mission-focused and discern which ones add the most value to pedagogy and scholarship?TO THE LEFTIn what ways might the integration of pedagogy and technology contribute to a more sustainable business model? AND BELOW THATHow might we integrate technology and pedagogy to enhance the value of liberal arts education for the 21st century student?AND MOVING TO THE RIGHTHow might we increase our environmental awareness to improve planning and decision-making and expand our capacity to adapt in the midst of continuously changing conditions?AND FINALLYHow might we align our individual efforts to address these challenges with others in the NITLE Network to broaden our impact?So, then how will we address these Lines of Inquiry?
  • Academic Commons

NITLE Lines of Inquiry 2013-2014 NITLE Lines of Inquiry 2013-2014 Presentation Transcript

  • Welcome Network Members
  • Our Aim Higher education leaders making the best possible strategic decisions to ensure mission-driven integration of pedagogy and technology.
  • Our Approach • Growing a knowledge network • Facilitating collaborative relationships, learning and projects • Prioritizing problems • Developing integrated strategies
  • Our Resources NITLE Fellows NITLE Network Academic Commons Communications Shared Practice Shared Academics Shared Libraries
  • Focusing on Complex Questions Through Three Lenses
  • Liberal Arts Mission and Practice How can higher education leaders make the best possible strategic decisions to ensure mission-driven integration of pedagogy and technology?
  • Emerging Information Ecology How can higher education leaders make the best possible strategic decisions to ensure mission-driven integration of pedagogy and technology?
  • Value and Sustainability How can higher education leaders make the best possible strategic decisions to ensure mission-driven integration of pedagogy and technology?
  • Liberal Arts Mission and Practice Emerging Information Ecology Value and Sustainability How can higher education leaders make the best possible strategic decisions to ensure mission-driven integration of pedagogy and technology?
  • Lines of Inquiry
  • How might we integrate technology and pedagogy to enhance the value of liberal arts education for the 21st century student? How might we increase our environmental awareness to improve planning and decision-making and expand our capacity to adapt in the midst of continuously changing conditions? How might we ensure our selection and use of digital technologies are mission- focused and discern which ones add the most value to pedagogy and scholarship? In what ways might the integration of pedagogy and technology contribute to a more sustainable business model? How might we align our individual efforts to address these challenges with others in the NITLE Network to broaden our impact?
  • Means to Address Lines of Inquiry EDUCATION Introduce New Concepts APPLICATION Prototype, Test, Experime nt INSTITUTIONALIZATION Establish Practice REVIEW Elicit Feedback and Report NITLE Network NITLE Fellows Academic Commons Shared Academics Shared Libraries Shared Practice Communications
  • NITLE Fellows strategic insight and analysis encouragement provocation concrete outcomes
  • Financial and economic realities impact our ability to implement and sustain the programmatic integration of pedagogy and technology. The rise of online alternatives to face-to-face teaching is attractive to many families as they make decisions about college. Our ability to deliver on the mission of integrating pedagogy and technology hinges in part on a healthy financial and business environment. The better we understand these issues and their implications, the better prepared we are to lead that integration. Focused on Small College Business Models and Implications for Integrating Pedagogy and Academic Technologies NITLE Senior Fellow Dr. Thomas A. Warger has held leadership roles in IT management in higher education for more than twenty years. He has served as chief information officer at Bryn Mawr College, IT projects coordinator at Five Colleges, Inc., and interim chief information officer at several other colleges. He has consulted at numerous colleges and universities. As a Senior Fellow, Tom has been instrumental in helping NITLE define a productive and sustainable program, and he is a leading contributor to NITLE on-campus consulting. NITLE Fellow Dr. Ethan Benatan has worked in higher education IT since the 1990s, serving in roles from graduate assistant to vice president and chief information officer. He has held positions at Reed College, Marylhurst University, Duquesne University, and (as a graduate student) at the University of Pittsburgh and Brookhaven National Laboratory. He is a Fellow of the American Leadership Forum (Oregon chapter) and a graduate of the Frye Institute. As a NITLE Fellow, Ethan is working with NITLE to think through the implications of shifting financial models on the business of the small college.
  • Focused on Small College Business Models and Implications for Integrating Pedagogy and Academic Technologies NITLE Fellow Dr. Rick Holmgren is vice president for information services & planning at Allegheny College. As a NITLE Fellow, Rick will publish several articles (one already published April 15 in Inside Higher Ed) addressing the business model of small colleges. The express purpose of these articles will be to help small colleges grapple with the business-model issues facing liberal arts colleges. NITLE Fellow Dr. Carol Long is the provost and vice president for academic affairs at SUNY Geneseo. As a NITLE Fellow, Carol will help develop a tool that defines metrics that college presidents can use to assess and express success rates in actually integrating pedagogy and technology. NITLE Fellow Ms. Carol Smith is the chief information officer at DePauw University. As a NITLE Fellow, Carol will be exploring how to develop a framework that helps campuses collaborate on the delivery of standard IT services.
  • Focused on Inter-Institutional Teaching NITLE Fellow Dr. Rebecca Frost Davis has been newly hired as the director for instructional and emerging technology at St. Edward’s University. We are very excited to see Rebecca move into this professional opportunity and even more delighted that she will continue to provide excellent service to the NITLE community. As a NITLE Fellow, Rebecca will develop several case studies on inter-institutional teaching for the NITLE Network. Outputs of the project will include: a literature review relevant to intercampus teaching, which will cover contextual issues such as team- teaching, teaching through video-conferencing, collaboration, etc.; a survey of intercampus teaching at NITLE institutions; a minimum of four case studies of compelling examples of intercampus teaching at liberal arts colleges, including interviews with faculty, students, support staff, and administrators; and a final report or white paper to be published via NITLE. There has been a significant interest and increase in inter-institutional teaching. NITLE has deep experience in this model, evident in Sunoikisis and the Texas Language Consortium, and we continue to help other consortia and institutions explore the opportunities and ramifications associated with it.
  • Focused on Digital Humanities and Emerging Pedagogical Forms NITLE Senior Fellow Dr. Bryan Alexander has recently begun a new venture (Bryan Alexander Consulting, LLC) as an independent researcher, futurist, writer, speaker, and consultant working in the field of technology and academia. We are very happy to support Bryan as he makes this transition and pleased that he will continue to work with NITLE as a senior Fellow, offering Network members research and consulting in emerging pedagogical forms, the digital humanities, and futurist methodologies. Bryan will continue to publish a monthly bulletin with the new title of Future Trends in Technology and Education. This monthly report will survey developments in how education is changing, primarily under the impact of digital technologies.
  • Focused on High Value Models for Distributed Education NITLE Fellow Dr. Tracy Mitrano is the director of IT Policy and the Institute for Computer Policy and Law of Cornell University. Tracy is interested in unearthing the ways in which institutions can use the technologies associated with MOOCs to create high-value models for “distance” or “distributed” education on a global level.
  • NITLE Fellow Dr. Kristine Bartanen, the academic vice president and dean of the university at the University of Puget Sound, will work with NITLE to help develop a framework for evaluating how best to acknowledge, evaluate, and reward digital scholarship. Focused on Digital Scholarship and the Tenure Promotion Process A recurring issue for NITLE schools is the role that digital scholarship plays in the tenure and promotion process. Despite the increasing availability of digital scholarship tools and resources, at many schools, perhaps most, there are challenges in understanding how best to acknowledge digital scholarship.
  • NITLE Fellow Dr. Chris Bourg is the assistant university librarian for public services at Stanford University. As a NITLE Fellow, Chris will publish several articles for NITLE on library leadership and organizational design issues to help academic libraries at small colleges think strategically about library services and scholarly communication. NITLE Fellow Mr. Mark Dahl is the director of the Aubrey R. Watzek Library at Lewis and Clark University. As a NITLE Fellow, Mark will write several articles for the NITLE Network, outlining guidelines to help college libraries move from building digital collections to developing digital initiatives centered around faculty and student scholarship; emerging modes of data services in liberal arts college libraries; and strategies for reconfiguring space in college libraries to meet a number of traditional and emerging academic needs on campus. Focused on Library Leadership and Scholarly Communication Despite significant changes in library services over the past decade, the academic library remains central to scholarship.
  • Examples of Aligning Work with Lines of Inquiry
  • EDUCATION Introduce New Concepts APPLICATION Prototype, Test, Experiment INSTITUTIONALIZATION Establish Practice REVIEW Elicit Feedback and Report How might we ensure our selection and use of digital technologies are mission- focused and discern which ones add the most value to pedagogy and scholarship? NITLE Fellow Rebecca Frost Davis will develop several case studies on inter-institutional teaching. OUTCOMES: • A literature review relevant to intercampus teaching • A survey of intercampus teaching at NITLE institutions • Four case studies of compelling examples of intercampus teaching at liberal arts colleges • Final report or white paper to be published via NITLE NITLE Fellow Kristine Bartanen, will work with NITLE to develop a framework for evaluating how best to acknowledge, evaluate, and reward digital scholarship. OUTCOME: • A framework to evaluate and reward digital scholarship. OUTCOMES: • Articles outlining guidelines to help college libraries move from building digital collections to developing digital initiatives centered around faculty and student scholarship; emerging modes of data services in liberal arts college libraries; and strategies for reconfiguring space in college libraries to meet a number of traditional and emerging academic needs on campus. NITLE Fellow Mark Dahl will write several articles. Five colleges seek to expand foreign language options for their students in 2012 and form the Texas Language Consortium. OUTCOME: • The Texas Language Consortium has completed its inaugural year and approved plans for a second year of course offerings (Spanish, French, German, M andarin Chinese and Portuguese).
  • EDUCATION Introduce New Concepts APPLICATION Prototype, Test, Experi ment INSTITUTIONALIZATION Establish Practice REVIEW Elicit Feedback and Report How might we align our individual efforts to address these challenges with others in the NITLE Network to broaden our impact? NITLE hosts a virtual gathering for Network institutions interested in examining the possibilities for synchronous international learning environments. OUTCOME: • Network institutions interested in creating synchronous international learning environment meet and share knowledge. NITLE Shared Academics invites Network members to share innovative approaches to integrating technology and pedagogy as seminar leaders. OUTCOME: • Network members are able to learn from and build upon ideas generated by colleagues within the Network. NITLE implements periodic surveys to assess Network needs and priorities. OUTCOME: • Results from surveys are reported to the Network and used to provide insights into addressing lines of inquiry.. NITLE updates list of Network institutions with HD videoconferencing capacity and hosts a virtual meet-and-greet so that institutions can connect with potential collaborators. OUTCOME: • An increased number of NITLE Network institutions collaborate using HD videoconferencing.
  • EDUCATION Introduce New Concepts APPLICATION Prototype, Test, Experi ment INSTITUTIONALIZATION Establish Practice REVIEW Elicit Feedback and Report How might we increase our environmental awareness to improve planning and decision- making and expand our capacity to adapt in the midst of continuously changing conditions? NITLE Senior Fellow Bryan Alexander leads an open discussion on future trends in higher education. NITLE Fellow Chris Bourg will publish articles on library leadership and organizational design issues. OUTCOME: • Articles that will help academic libraries at small colleges think strategically about library services and scholarly communication. OUTCOME: • Participants practice using their own observations to envision potential futures in higher education. NITLE hosts prediction markets. OUTCOME: • Participants get to experiment with how crowd sourced information can help in examining potential futures. NITLE’s periodic surveys include questions on adaptability and change readiness. OUTCOME: • Results provide an indication of proven practice and challenge areas. NITLE Shared Practice has subject area specialists who can help with visualization, modeling, simulati ons, course design and project management. OUTCOME: • Institutions improve their planning and decision-making through the guidance of subject area specialists.
  • EDUCATION Introduce New Concepts APPLICATION Prototype, Test, Experi ment INSTITUTIONALIZATION Establish Practice REVIEW Elicit Feedback and Report How might we integrate technology and pedagogy to enhance the value of liberal arts education for the 21st century student? Academic Commons features an issue of Transformations with various essays on Games in Education. OUTCOME: • Introduced possibilities for augmenting students’ international experiences through the use of digital technologies. OUTCOME: • Broaden readers’ perspectives on the uses of games in education. Shared Academics presented “The Synchronous International Classroom: New Directions for Cost Control of Foreign Study Programs” – Thomas Howe, Southwestern University NITLE Network institutions engage students in the practice of digitizing special collections. OUTCOME: • Students learn digitization techniques and gain experience with new technologies.
  • EDUCATION Introduce New Concepts APPLICATION Prototype, Test, Experi ment INSTITUTIONALIZATION Establish Practice REVIEW Elicit Feedback and Report In what ways might the integration of pedagogy and technology contribute to a more sustainable business model? NITLE Fellow Rick Holmgren will publish several addressing the business model of small colleges. NITLE Fellow Carol Smith will be exploring how to develop a framework that helps campuses collaborate on the delivery of standard IT services. NITLE Senior Fellow Tom Warger is helping Shared Practice develop a team of subject-area specialists who can provide consulting services. OUTCOME: • Articles addressing the business model of small colleges. “The Real Precipice” was published April 15, 2013 in Inside Higher Education. OUTCOME: • Institutions will be able to contract consultants to help them address their specific needs. OUTCOME: • Potential frameworks for helping campuses collaborate on the delivery of standard IT services. NITLE Fellow Ethan Benatan is working with NITLE to think through the implications of shifting financial models on the business of the small college. OUTCOME: • New insights on the implications of shifting financial models. NITLE Shared Academics will host seminars featuring the results from NITLE Fellows projects. OUTCOME: • Network institutions can learn from the results of NITLE Fellows’ work.
  • A Few Ideas on How To Derive From And Add Value To The NITLE Network • Subscribe to the NITLE News. • Invite a group to attend a Shared AcademicsTM seminar with you. • Use the Shared Academics Discussion Guides to prompt conversation on your campus. • Follow NITLE on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn; share resources and articles that are valuable to you with the Network. #NITLE • View recordings of Shared Academics seminars that you miss. • Bring a subject-area specialist to campus. • Join Academic Commons and share valuable resources with your colleagues. • Suggest potential topics or seminar leaders for Shared Academics. • Contribute to Academic Commons. • Offer to moderate a Shared Academics seminar. • Play the NITLE Prediction Market.
  • Development of Lines of Inquiry To help liberal arts colleges integrate inquiry, pedagogy, and technology, NITLE begins by listening to the concerns of the NITLE Network and identifying which inquiries are most important to its members. In planning for 2013-2014, NITLE gathered input from a variety of sources, including: – meetings with the NITLE advisory board – meetings with NITLE Network constituents (e.g., NITLE Summit and Symposium) – ongoing work with the NITLE Fellows – ongoing conversations with NITLE Network constituents (e.g., Shared Academics seminars, Shared Practice leadership programs, NITLE e-mail lists, social media) – suggestions/requests from NITLE Network constituents (e.g., Shared Academics seminar topics and requests for strategic consulting) – the NITLE Future Trends survey – discussions within related organizations and higher-ed trade journals Sifting through this input, NITLE identified key concerns, organizing them into thematic categories and drafting inquiry statements. NITLE then shared the inquiries with NITLE Fellows and advisors, incorporating their feedback. This iterative process, while ongoing, has resulted in lines of inquiry to be examined by the NITLE Network in 2013-2014.