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Mooc.mania

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  • Welcome to this NITLE Shared AcademicsTM event.
  • Notes test hereMore notes
  • As a benefit of membership, NITLE Shared AcademicsTM offers members of The NITLE Network access to expert presenters without incurring the travel costs of bringing them to their individual campuses while additionally enabling them to be in a virtual classroom with colleagues at other institutions. This platform allows for a high level of engagement much like you would find in a classroom at one of our institutions.
  • The key issue we are really debating here is public higher education – if not public education as a whole. As we’ll see, there is a very large wage premium for the BA in the US. Yet we do not have the capacity to give everyone a BA (in part because that would mean more investment in education.)This creates a perverse tension between what colleges and universities do, and whether students actually engage in deep, reflective, critical learning (the BA or BS being a badge earned through learning) (CLICK FOR MERITOCRACY)– or they just go through the required motions, pay the required fees and end up with a commodity degree. (CLICK FOR GRAPHIC) This is an unresolved tension because our current conditions of austerity (Click for Blyth) we cannot contemplate increased public funding for higher education – whether through building public institutions like community colleges, or increasing Pell grants or other aid for needy students. These grants, as we’ll see, aren’t nearly as helpful to the poorest students as we might hope anyway.So by public higher ed, I don’t mean only public colleges, but the notion of the United States having a broadly functioning higher education system through which anyone with the intellectual ability and desire could acquire a degree that is actually indicative of learning and growth rather than the ability to pay.The limits of austerity are not natural, but are set in large part by a set of ideologies promoted by the business community – especially among financiers. So, for instance, Moody’s seems very keen to promote MOOCs as an advance – as in their announcement yesterday afternoon that having a MOOC might help a large university’s credit rating, but might hurt a small college. (click for graphic, then for it to disappear.)In short, the limits on what can be done in public education are maintained by pressures from what we will call the plutocratic thought leaders in the U.S. (click for graphic) and by the exciting new technologies (CLICK for GRAPHICS) that may enhance learning, learning communities, and learning analytics. I am going to go quickly through laying out this argument and then I hope you can tell me if it sounds right and, if so, what we can do about it.
  • The key issue we are really debating here is public higher education – if not public education as a whole. As we’ll see, there is a very large wage premium for the BA in the US. Yet we do not have the capacity to give everyone a BA (in part because that would mean more investment in education.)This creates a perverse tension between what colleges and universities do, and whether students actually engage in deep, reflective, critical learning (the BA or BS being a badge earned through learning) (CLICK FOR MERITOCRACY)– or they just go through the required motions, pay the required fees and end up with a commodity degree. (CLICK FOR GRAPHIC) This is an unresolved tension because our current conditions of austerity (Click for Blyth) we cannot contemplate increased public funding for higher education – whether through building public institutions like community colleges, or increasing Pell grants or other aid for needy students. These grants, as we’ll see, aren’t nearly as helpful to the poorest students as we might hope anyway.So by public higher ed, I don’t mean only public colleges, but the notion of the United States having a broadly functioning higher education system through which anyone with the intellectual ability and desire could acquire a degree that is actually indicative of learning and growth rather than the ability to pay.The limits of austerity are not natural, but are set in large part by a set of ideologies promoted by the business community – especially among financiers. So, for instance, Moody’s seems very keen to promote MOOCs as an advance – as in their announcement yesterday afternoon that having a MOOC might help a large university’s credit rating, but might hurt a small college. (click for graphic, then for it to disappear.)In short, the limits on what can be done in public education are maintained by pressures from what we will call the plutocratic thought leaders in the U.S. (click for graphic) and by the exciting new technologies (CLICK for GRAPHICS) that may enhance learning, learning communities, and learning analytics. I am going to go quickly through laying out this argument and then I hope you can tell me if it sounds right and, if so, what we can do about it.
  • The key issue we are really debating here is public higher education – if not public education as a whole. As we’ll see, there is a very large wage premium for the BA in the US. Yet we do not have the capacity to give everyone a BA (in part because that would mean more investment in education.)This creates a perverse tension between what colleges and universities do, and whether students actually engage in deep, reflective, critical learning (the BA or BS being a badge earned through learning) (CLICK FOR MERITOCRACY)– or they just go through the required motions, pay the required fees and end up with a commodity degree. (CLICK FOR GRAPHIC) This is an unresolved tension because our current conditions of austerity (Click for Blyth) we cannot contemplate increased public funding for higher education – whether through building public institutions like community colleges, or increasing Pell grants or other aid for needy students. These grants, as we’ll see, aren’t nearly as helpful to the poorest students as we might hope anyway.So by public higher ed, I don’t mean only public colleges, but the notion of the United States having a broadly functioning higher education system through which anyone with the intellectual ability and desire could acquire a degree that is actually indicative of learning and growth rather than the ability to pay.The limits of austerity are not natural, but are set in large part by a set of ideologies promoted by the business community – especially among financiers. So, for instance, Moody’s seems very keen to promote MOOCs as an advance – as in their announcement yesterday afternoon that having a MOOC might help a large university’s credit rating, but might hurt a small college. (click for graphic, then for it to disappear.)In short, the limits on what can be done in public education are maintained by pressures from what we will call the plutocratic thought leaders in the U.S. (click for graphic) and by the exciting new technologies (CLICK for GRAPHICS) that may enhance learning, learning communities, and learning analytics. I am going to go quickly through laying out this argument and then I hope you can tell me if it sounds right and, if so, what we can do about it.
  • The key issue we are really debating here is public higher education – if not public education as a whole. As we’ll see, there is a very large wage premium for the BA in the US. Yet we do not have the capacity to give everyone a BA (in part because that would mean more investment in education.)This creates a perverse tension between what colleges and universities do, and whether students actually engage in deep, reflective, critical learning (the BA or BS being a badge earned through learning) (CLICK FOR MERITOCRACY)– or they just go through the required motions, pay the required fees and end up with a commodity degree. (CLICK FOR GRAPHIC) This is an unresolved tension because our current conditions of austerity (Click for Blyth) we cannot contemplate increased public funding for higher education – whether through building public institutions like community colleges, or increasing Pell grants or other aid for needy students. These grants, as we’ll see, aren’t nearly as helpful to the poorest students as we might hope anyway.So by public higher ed, I don’t mean only public colleges, but the notion of the United States having a broadly functioning higher education system through which anyone with the intellectual ability and desire could acquire a degree that is actually indicative of learning and growth rather than the ability to pay.The limits of austerity are not natural, but are set in large part by a set of ideologies promoted by the business community – especially among financiers. So, for instance, Moody’s seems very keen to promote MOOCs as an advance – as in their announcement yesterday afternoon that having a MOOC might help a large university’s credit rating, but might hurt a small college. (click for graphic, then for it to disappear.)In short, the limits on what can be done in public education are maintained by pressures from what we will call the plutocratic thought leaders in the U.S. (click for graphic) and by the exciting new technologies (CLICK for GRAPHICS) that may enhance learning, learning communities, and learning analytics. I am going to go quickly through laying out this argument and then I hope you can tell me if it sounds right and, if so, what we can do about it.
  • The key issue we are really debating here is public higher education – if not public education as a whole. As we’ll see, there is a very large wage premium for the BA in the US. Yet we do not have the capacity to give everyone a BA (in part because that would mean more investment in education.)This creates a perverse tension between what colleges and universities do, and whether students actually engage in deep, reflective, critical learning (the BA or BS being a badge earned through learning) (CLICK FOR MERITOCRACY)– or they just go through the required motions, pay the required fees and end up with a commodity degree. (CLICK FOR GRAPHIC) This is an unresolved tension because our current conditions of austerity (Click for Blyth) we cannot contemplate increased public funding for higher education – whether through building public institutions like community colleges, or increasing Pell grants or other aid for needy students. These grants, as we’ll see, aren’t nearly as helpful to the poorest students as we might hope anyway.So by public higher ed, I don’t mean only public colleges, but the notion of the United States having a broadly functioning higher education system through which anyone with the intellectual ability and desire could acquire a degree that is actually indicative of learning and growth rather than the ability to pay.The limits of austerity are not natural, but are set in large part by a set of ideologies promoted by the business community – especially among financiers. So, for instance, Moody’s seems very keen to promote MOOCs as an advance – as in their announcement yesterday afternoon that having a MOOC might help a large university’s credit rating, but might hurt a small college. (click for graphic, then for it to disappear.)In short, the limits on what can be done in public education are maintained by pressures from what we will call the plutocratic thought leaders in the U.S. (click for graphic) and by the exciting new technologies (CLICK for GRAPHICS) that may enhance learning, learning communities, and learning analytics. I am going to go quickly through laying out this argument and then I hope you can tell me if it sounds right and, if so, what we can do about it.
  • The key issue we are really debating here is public higher education – if not public education as a whole. As we’ll see, there is a very large wage premium for the BA in the US. Yet we do not have the capacity to give everyone a BA (in part because that would mean more investment in education.)This creates a perverse tension between what colleges and universities do, and whether students actually engage in deep, reflective, critical learning (the BA or BS being a badge earned through learning) (CLICK FOR MERITOCRACY)– or they just go through the required motions, pay the required fees and end up with a commodity degree. (CLICK FOR GRAPHIC) This is an unresolved tension because our current conditions of austerity (Click for Blyth) we cannot contemplate increased public funding for higher education – whether through building public institutions like community colleges, or increasing Pell grants or other aid for needy students. These grants, as we’ll see, aren’t nearly as helpful to the poorest students as we might hope anyway.So by public higher ed, I don’t mean only public colleges, but the notion of the United States having a broadly functioning higher education system through which anyone with the intellectual ability and desire could acquire a degree that is actually indicative of learning and growth rather than the ability to pay.The limits of austerity are not natural, but are set in large part by a set of ideologies promoted by the business community – especially among financiers. So, for instance, Moody’s seems very keen to promote MOOCs as an advance – as in their announcement yesterday afternoon that having a MOOC might help a large university’s credit rating, but might hurt a small college. (click for graphic, then for it to disappear.)In short, the limits on what can be done in public education are maintained by pressures from what we will call the plutocratic thought leaders in the U.S. (click for graphic) and by the exciting new technologies (CLICK for GRAPHICS) that may enhance learning, learning communities, and learning analytics. I am going to go quickly through laying out this argument and then I hope you can tell me if it sounds right and, if so, what we can do about it.
  • First, the technology piece.
  • Many people probably heard of the story of Target’s data mining project, which eventually yielded 25 products that could be used to calculate a customer’s pregnancy prediction score. Using data collected from customers at checkout (and cross referenced with the baby registry database) they were able to accurately predict when an Atlanta teenager was pregnant before she had told her father. The promise of big data is all around – and as the NSA’s PRISM program (Click to get image) suggests, so are its perils.In any case, this is one of the real outcomes that some MOOC providers hope to produce. The platform launched by Harvard and MIT – edX (Click for image) – says that they hope to use the data on student learning to better understand how students learn. As a recent research paper on a class offered through edX puts it (click to next slide)
  • The findings from this study echo what we’ve heard in others. Basically that people who collaborate with others offline have a better chance of success. (click for quote) Since many MOOC platforms are set up to allow for structured interactions, some of this is built in.
  • The findings from this study echo what we’ve heard in others. Basically that people who collaborate with others offline have a better chance of success. (click for quote) Since many MOOC platforms are set up to allow for structured interactions, some of this is built in.
  • But other more wide ranging studies of online education, such as the report from the community college research center at the teachers college of Columbia University (which aggregated data from 400,000 students, 10% of whom were taking classes online) note that students who have trouble in face to face classes have an even harder time in online courses. (CLICK FOR CONCLUSION)So, in other words, what we are probably looking at is not the end of the problems we face in higher education, but the shift in scope, scale, and venue. MOOCs will not change everything, but they might help. What we are seeing, therefore, is the MOOC as a myth.
  • Mosco and others have illustrated this for us - and I'm sure you have other examples you can think of...
  • Vincent Mosco in a more recent essay notes, "The first radio courses in the early 1920s prompted Radio Broadcast magazine to forecast “the advent of the ‘University of the Air.’ ” One enthusiast declared: “The lid of the classroom has been blown off, and the walls have been set on the circumference of the globe.” Thanks to radio, “every home has the potentiality of becoming an extension of Carnegie Hall or Harvard University (MOSCO)
  • Tim Wu, in Master Switch quotes D. W. Griffith the revolutionary film maker of the 1920s as saying the innovations in his craft would make it so that, "Children in the public schools will be taught practically everything by moving pictures. Certainly they will never be obliged to read history again." 
  • Perhaps more importantly for today, Much as books have been shrunk down to the size of 140 character tweets, Thrun says he expects that we'll continue to compress education."I believe that 50 years from now, education will be as short and sweet as Twitter is today. It will be like an evening talk. And that will be a fantastic moment."I especially like that Thrun's quote is couched in his saying that he's never sat through a whole MOOC. This is telling since that is par for the course, so to speak: attrition rate is horrible! They might be better attended at 140 characters long.
  • If Thurn is the solution then, I think I side with George Seimans And Since the meme is still a little warm at this point, I might also point to EvgenyMorozov's handy new concept
  • It is these more difficult political questions – framing the entire debate – which are important to note.
  • The primary tension we see here is the tension between the college degree being an emblem of a broad form of post-secondary learning and personal development; and the college degree as a commodity certificate whose primary purpose is to create premium in job market. One of the leading proponents of Clay Shirky, points to MOOCs as arriving in a certain economic context.
  • We are going to spend the next few minutes examining Shirky’s graphic here. I’m going to bracket some of the “cost disease” problems of higher ed here. The work colleges and universities do is expensive. But many of the problems in terms of both the rise of tuition and the lack of wage growth and employment are a result of a perverse economic system. As I said, from the perspective of austerity, MOOCs seem to provide an answer.
  • Or as Shirky puts it: read slide. To this, I would add, policy makers who have no public revenue to work with are also asking their plutocratic campaign donors if this might work for them.
  • This inequality is something we should examine because it is part of what is itself driving the MOOC debate.
  • Chrystia Freeland is a reporter for “Roiters.” She conducted interviews with many of the richest and most powerful people on the global stage today – and it is important to note that they see themselves as global rather than national citizens. In her assessment, they still believe in the idea of the meritocracy, they just don’t want to pay for it.
  • To get a picture, for those of you who haven’t seen these numbers, we have an objectively plutocratic system which increasingly rewards those who already have abundant resources rather than lifting the rest of society with their rising tide. I point this out because this material condition carries with it an outlook – an outlook shared by many of our leaders in government, business, and even higher education administration.
  • As you can see in this graph, for contrast, in the period between 1940 and 1974, the golden age of American capitalism, when top income rates were taxed as high as 90% for a time, average income grew by almost 30 thousand dollars. The bottom 90% of the income distribution shared a relatively proportional 70% of that income growth; while the top 10% got a disproportionate premium of 27%. In his recent book “Marketplace of ideas” Louis Menand says this was also the time when higher education institutions witnessed the most growth in terms of capacity. Since then, it’s been downhill. NEXT SLIDE
  • In the last thirty five years or so, there has been far less average growth – nearly a third less overall – and all of that growth has gone to the richest 10%.
  • A different view of those statistics, since 1979, the top 1% has seen their incomes grow by 130%, while the bottom 90% have seen only 15%
  • In real terms, wages have been stagnant for nearly three decades.
  • Despite growth in productivity
  • This is even more disproportionate when we look at how this has affected the distribution of wealth – where the top five % have accumulated 80% of the wealth in the US since 1983. The EPI doesn’t have new numbers yet, but the recession has only exacerbated it.
  • The flipside of this, is the growth in debt
  • Which is especially evident in the middle income brackets. It is worth noting that much of this debt – as with the home equity withdrawals of the housing boom – was taken on to support things like education and health care. Debt was being used to supplement stagnant income growth. And, again, the recession has only amplified this.
  • The recession has led to unemployment across the income spectrum, with all education levels seeing nearly double their previous unemployment rate.
  • And, yes,The economic crises of the last decade, has produced a stagnant to declining wage advantage for college grads.
  • But part of this can be mapped onto the fact that companies are simply not investing in jobs in this country.
  • So to go back to shirky’s diagram, 5.6 annual growth is a problem – but it is still less than the 6-7% annual growth libraries have seen in their serial costs. And in the case of public universities, where the tuition growth has been faster, this has everything to do with fall in public funds. Wage side of the scissor is equally important – and has been for three decades. And the rising tuition is not just to pay for fancy dorms. It is also to make up for falling public support of higher ed, much of it facilitated by states, localities, and lobbyists at every level.
  • So, back in march the Chronicle ran a story pointing out that we are nearing a 50-50 break even point where net tuition revenue made up 47 percent of public colleges educational costs. This is up from 1987, when tuition made up only 23% of higher education revenue.
  • Part of this is due to the boondoggle of tax incentives, which research shows does little to create jobs.
  • The tech companies – and their former employees – who are promoting MOOCs as the answer to higher education are among the most creative tax dodgers…
  • Despite the fact that they have benefited from those tax dollars – here is the $4.5 million National Science Foundation grant that helped get Google off the ground.
  • This brings us back to public higher ed.
  • By commodity degree I mean As problematic as it might seem, this is effec
  • Also, serves the bottom of the market and uses political clout and economic muscle to eliminate its competition.
  • For Profits serve the bottom income brackets much more than any other sector. Part of this is by design – for instance,
  • This is fully in line with what Christensen says about disruptive innovation. Though he doesn’t admit it, the companies that are able to dominate use any manner of muscle they have to shift the market in their favor – including political leverage.
  • Here we can see the extremely disproportionate amount of loans going to for-profit colleges and universities.
  • In some ways this is where small, liberal arts schools are most culpable, at least in aggregate. As a recent report on the way Pell funds are used.
  • This is, of course, an equal opportunity sport.
  • So when you look at the sector that has seen the most growth before the recession, and then the most contraction after it, it is clear there is a major gap in providing needy students education and actually delivering on the meritocratic promise of American Higher Education. The question that MOOCs attempt to answer is who will be the parties that will help do this and what are we educating people for.
  • It appears that some technology companies are using their financial clout to set up an educational system they can more easily exploit for profits – and which will help generate the kinds of workers they want.
  • The real threat – or promise – may come from competency based credentials. Liberal Arts colleges may find these very interesting, but only when they are geared towards actually having students reflect on learning, rather than just speeding them through a degree program in order to get their commodity BA.
  • Thanks for attending—you will receive an invitation to evaluate this seminar via email.

Mooc.mania Mooc.mania Presentation Transcript

  • MOOC ManiaWelcomeIn chat, please …• Introduce yourself with your name andinstitution.• Indicate if you are participating as a group.• Share what you want to get out of today’sseminar.
  • MOOC ManiaParticipating in Today’s SeminarThis seminar is being recorded.Click to OpenPanels forParticipants &Chat
  • MOOC Mania and theAmbivalent Future ofAmerican Higher EducationSean Andrews, ACLS PublicFellow and Director, NITLEShared Libraries
  • MOOC ManiaSome premises• Context is important• Determination is contextual– Raymond Williams: Determination derived bythe setting of limits and the application ofpressures.• What are the key issues in the MOOC debate?• What are the limits and pressures?• Why are we having this particular conversation atthis particular moment?
  • MOOC ManiaPublichighered
  • MOOC ManiaMeritocracy(of learning)CommodityDegree
  • MOOC ManiaMeritocracy(of learning)CommodityDegree
  • MOOC ManiaMeritocracy(of learning)CommodityDegreePublichighered
  • MOOC ManiaMeritocracy(of learning)CommodityDegreePlutocracyPublichighered
  • MOOC Mania
  • MOOC ManiaMeritocracy(of learning)CommodityDegreePlutocracyPublichigheredtechnology
  • MOOC Maniatechnology
  • MOOC Mania
  • MOOC Mania
  • MOOC Mania
  • MOOC Mania
  • MOOC ManiaMyth of technological sublime―Today’s world of new media is not the firstto be christened with magical powers totranscend the present and institute a neworder. But they also demonstrate thattranscendence is not easy to sustain.[The] sublime eventually fades into thebanality of everyday life.‖- Mosco, Digital Sublime
  • MOOC Mania―The lid of the classroomhas been blown off, and thewalls have been set on thecircumference of the globe.‖[Thanks to radio,]―every home has thepotentiality of becoming anextension of Carnegie Hallor Harvard University‖- Radio Broadcast Magazine
  • MOOC Mania
  • MOOC Mania"I believe that 50 years from now, educationwill be as short and sweet as Twitter istoday. It will be like an evening talk. And thatwill be a fantastic moment.”- Sebastian Thrun, Udacity founderhttps://www.edsurge.com/n/2013-04-02-udacity-s-sebastian-thrun-on-the-future-of-education
  • MOOC ManiaGeorge Siemans―The problem of education does not concernme as much as the solutions to theproblem of education are starting toconcern me.‖- in response tosomething Jeff Jarvissaid…at a TED talk.
  • MOOC Mania―Solutionism‖• ―An unhealthy preoccupationwith sexy, monumental, andnarrow-minded solutions [. ..] to problems that areextremely complex, fluid, andcontentious.‖• ―How problems arecomposed matters every bitas how they are solved.‖
  • MOOC ManiaMOOCs as Solutionism―The quick fixes it peddles do not exist in apolitical vacuum. In promising almostimmediate and much cheaper results, theycan easily undermine support for moreambitious, more intellectually stimulating,but also more demanding reform projects.‖
  • MOOC ManiaMeritocracy(of learning)CommodityDegree
  • MOOC Maniahttp://www.businessinsider.com/growth-in-college-tuition-vs-growth-in-earnings-for-college-graduates-2012-11
  • MOOC ManiaThis is why MOOCs matter. Not becausedistance learning is some big new thing orbecause online lectures are a solution toall our problems, but because they’vecome along at a time when students andparents are willing to ask themselves,"Isn’t there some other way to do this?"
  • MOOC ManiaMOOCs as ―Disruption‖• Dismisses any political or social answer tothe problem.– MARKET, CONSUMERS, and TECH primary• Overlooks the political, social, and culturalelements to their vision coming to pass.– True even of Clayton Christensen’s examples,e.g. disk drives.
  • MOOC ManiaBA Premium• US has one of the largest earningspremiums: Henwood and Featherstone– ―Someone with a bachelor’s earns 77% morethan someone with only a high school diploma(or international equivalent) 24 points aboveOECD average. The college premium looks tobe broadly associated with the general levelof inequality, with Brazil and the US at the top,Sweden at the bottom.‖
  • MOOC ManiaPlutocracy
  • MOOC ManiaPLUTOCRACYSince 1970s –Rising inequalityStagnant wagesFalling public funding for higher educationRising student debtSince 2007-Soaring corporate profitsLittle investmentStubborn unemployment
  • MOOC Mania
  • MOOC ManiaGlobal Plutocracy―The rich of today are also different from the rich ofyesterday. Our light-speed, globally connected economyhas led to the rise of a new super-elite that consists, to anotable degree, of first- and second-generation wealth.Its members are hardworking, highly educated, jet-setting meritocrats who feel they are the deservingwinners of a tough, worldwide economic competition—and, as a result, have an ambivalent attitude towardthose of us who haven’t succeeded quite sospectacularly. They tend to believe in the institutions thatpermit social mobility, but are less enthusiastic about theeconomic redistribution—i.e., taxes—it takes to pay forthose institutions.‖http://breakingculture.tumblr.com/post/41790069710/reflective-writing-and-expropriation
  • MOOC Mania
  • MOOC Mania
  • MOOC Mania
  • MOOC Mania
  • MOOC Mania
  • MOOC Maniahttp://www.epi.org/publication/11-telling-charts-about-2011-economy/
  • MOOC Mania
  • MOOC Mania
  • MOOC ManiaWorkers don’t lack skills, they lack workhttp://www.epi.org/publication/workers-dont-lack-skills-lack-work/
  • MOOC Mania“For full-time, full-year workers, the hourly wage declines from2000 to 2012 represent a roughly $3,200 decline.”http://www.epi.org/publication/snapshot-wages-young-college-graduates-failed-grow/
  • MOOC ManiaNo jobs because no investmenthttp://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2013/02/liberal-arts-majors-didnt-kill-the-economy/272940/?fb_action_ids=10151520078370485&fb_action_types=og.recommends&fb_source=aggregation&fb_aggregation_id=288381481237582
  • MOOC ManiaBruce Bartlett, in NYT―many corporations are holding vast amounts ofcash and other liquid assets, using them neitherfor investment nor to benefit shareholders.These assets are largely earned and heldoverseas, and not subject to American taxesuntil the money is brought home.‖―As of the third quarter of 2012 nonfinancialcorporations in the United States held $1.7trillion of liquid assets‖
  • MOOC ManiaSavings, not investment
  • MOOC Maniahttp://thinkprogress.org/economy/2012/12/10/1308981/chart-corporate-profits-skyrocket-while-corporate-taxes-plummet/?mobile=nc
  • MOOC Maniahttp://www.businessinsider.com/growth-in-college-tuition-vs-growth-in-earnings-for-college-graduates-2012-11
  • MOOC Mania
  • MOOC ManiaAll ―perfectly legal‖• ―Texas gives out $19 billion per year incorporate subsidies.‖• ―To help balance its budget last year,Texas cut public education spending by$5.4 billion — a significant decreaseconsidering that it already ranked 11thfrom the bottom among all states in per-pupil financing, according to recent datafrom the Census Bureau‖– http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/03/us/winners-and-losers-in-texas.html?smid=fb-share&_r=2&#h[]
  • MOOC ManiaTech companies as tax dodgers• ―Apple deferred taxes on over $35.4 billionin offshore income between 2009 and2011.‖– http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/04/business/an-inquiry-into-tech-giants-tax-strategies-nears-an-end.html?_r=0• ―Google Inc. avoided about $2 billion inworldwide income taxes in 2011 by shifting$9.8 billion in revenues into a Bermudashell company, almost double the totalfrom three years before, filings show.‖– http://breakingculture.tumblr.com/post/37718667423/google-is-a-u-s-tax-deadbeat
  • MOOC Mania
  • MOOC ManiaPublichighered• Not just ―Public‖ schools, but how and whywe, as a society fund and supporteducation.• Cannot separate higher ed from k-12,which is also seeing many of the samethreats/pressures• Private market more efficient• Testing to justify ROI of public funds• Technology = efficiency
  • MOOC Maniae.g.• Florida - Now mandatory that all studentsmust take at least one class online beforegraduating high school.– Led by Jeb Bush– Supporter of Academic Partnerships• Virtual Charter systems in FL, Colorado,Virginia, and Texas among other states.– Teacher:student can be as high as 1:137– Widespread graft, little oversight.
  • MOOC ManiaStats• US – Spends 1/3 more than OECD average oneducation, second highest of any country (exceededonly by Iceland)• 41% of Ed spending on Tertiary Education, 15 pointsabove average.• 23% of Americans in their 20s are enrolled in someform of higher ed. 2% below OECD average– Finland = 43%– EU Average = 33%• 16th in terms of completion
  • MOOC ManiaObama Admin• Leading world in BA by 2020• Higher rate of completion• Lower debt• Time to degree (three years ideal)• ―Accountability‖– Bush era Spellings report recommendation• Western Governor’s as model– Competency based; no tenured faculty; allonline; public, non-profit, lower cost.
  • MOOC ManiaNot public vs. private• Federal, state and local dollars subsidizeeducation at all levels – because of ourmeritocratic ideology.• Instead:– Who will use federal dollars to produce moredegrees/credentialed citizens?– And what kind of skills will they teach.
  • MOOC ManiaCommodityDegree
  • MOOC ManiaTrue disruptive innovation• For profits – mining public dollarsefficiently by exploiting underservedstudents who qualify for higher Pell grants– not technological – political economic– Spend< 25% of funds on education– More on marketing, recruiting, debt peonage– 10% of ed market, 25% of federal aid– In some cases 85% of income from tax $$– http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CPRT-112SPRT74931/pdf/CPRT-112SPRT74931.pdf
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  • MOOC Maniahttp://americanindependent.com/218052/university-of-phoenix-fought-against-community-college-expansion
  • MOOC ManiaAs the share of enrollment in the for-profit sector increased from 6% in fall 2001 to 12% in fall 2010, the shareof Pell Grant funds going to students in this sector increased from 14% to 25%. In fall 2011, for-profitenrollments remained at 12% of FTE students, and the sector’s share of Pell Grants declined to 21%.
  • MOOC Mania2011 Pell Grants = $37billion21% = $7.5 billion+21% Stafford+23% Unsub. Stafforde.g. University of Phoenixderives 85-88% of revenuesfrom U.S. Governmentfunding
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  • MOOC ManiaPell helps colleges poach middleclass payments• ―more than one-third of public colleges and nearlytwo-thirds of private colleges engage in ―gapping‖— providing lower-income students with aidpackages that don’t come close to meeting theirfinancial need. In the parlance of enrollmentmanagement, this is often called ―admit-deny,‖ inwhich schools deliberately underfund financiallyneedy students in order to discourage them fromenrolling.‖• http://public.tableausoftware.com/views/pellprivates_test/Sheet1?:embed=y&:display_count=no
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  • MOOC ManiaHmmm• Tech industry investing in more training forpeople to build the robots to replace us– Udacity, GIT Computer Science MA MOOC• VC hoping to cash in on federal dollars setaside for this training– For-profits didn’t pan out, but mayberebranding of online will pay off.– Lots of money in this– And a lot of people to be served.
  • MOOC ManiaCompetency based credentials• Southern New Hamshire University– Predicted to make $200 million in 2013-2014– Fully online• Governor’s State University– Amendment written in 2005 allowing them togrant degree based on competency instead ofcredit hour.
  • MOOC ManiaMy Verdict• We must do all of the above– Improve use of ed tech– Combat plutocratic abandonment ofeducation, decent jobs and wages, and– Ensure the future of the U.S. meritocracy• …Maybe we should do a MOOC on this
  • MOOC ManiaThank YouPlease evaluate this event:nitle.org