NITLE Shared Academics: Lessons from a Flipped Classroom
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NITLE Shared Academics: Lessons from a Flipped Classroom

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The term “flipped classroom” has become both familiar and increasingly more nebulous as its legitimacy is appropriated by companies like Coursera, Udacity, and EdX to construct a market for ...

The term “flipped classroom” has become both familiar and increasingly more nebulous as its legitimacy is appropriated by companies like Coursera, Udacity, and EdX to construct a market for pre-recorded video lectures. Critics argue that the flipped classroom shifts attention away from engagement with primary evidence, constructing learning entirely around pre-recorded lectures and replacing reading with viewing. Advocates, including seminar leader Jen Ebbeler, point to the variable ways that a “flipped classroom” can be designed and argue that a flipped class can allow for more attention to reading, analysis, and higher-order problem solving. This seminar offered by NITLE looked at how we can incorporate the elements of the flipped classroom to enhance student learning as well as the quality of our instruction. It also examined some of the potential pitfalls and offered suggestions for avoiding them.

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NITLE Shared Academics: Lessons from a Flipped Classroom NITLE Shared Academics: Lessons from a Flipped Classroom Presentation Transcript

  • Dr. Jennifer Ebbeler jebbeler@austin.utexas.edu Associate Professor of Classics University of Texas, Austin 6 November 2013 http://prezi.com/wlrxk5yn9gub/les sons-from-a-flipped-classroom/
  • A) assign videotaped lectures, spend class time on problem sets, discussion B) reversal of traditional inside class and out of class activities C) redistribution of learning activities, to emphasize active learning during class D) a trendy but ill-defined term E) All of the above
  • STRUCTURED ACTIVE IN CLASS LEARNING Intentionality
  •   Ian Bogost, “The Condensed Classroom” Jonathan Rees, “On Boring” Derek Bruff, “Class time Reconsidered” What is entirety of course content? What tools, structure do I need to put in place to accomplish objectives?
  •     Assigned “Readings”  Primary and secondary Problem sets/practice questions Discussion: live and online Lecture: pre-recorded and live      Active, not passive Variation Technology serves pedagogy Good enough is best Video as last resort  Make your own OR curate carefully
  • INSTITUTIONAL   Tangible Resources  Technology  Instructional Design and Assessment Specialists  $$ and Time for Course Development  Additional Classroom Staff Support for Risk-Taking IN THE CLASSROOM
  •    Students flip class, not instructor or course design “Stealth” Approach Incentivized Structure, accountability
  • FALL 2012 /SPRING 2013 FALL 2013
  •         F 11 F12 A: 29.5 A-: 12.5 B+: 9 B: 16 B-: 9 C+: 4 C-F: 20 25 15 15.5 15.5 8 3 18 Sp 13 41 10 9 10.5 6 4 19.5