History Engine 2.0: Researching Locally, Collaborating Globally
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History Engine 2.0: Researching Locally, Collaborating Globally

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Robert Nelson, Director, Digital Scholarship Lab, University of Richmond, and Christine Berkowitz, Lecturer, University of Toronto Scarborough...

Robert Nelson, Director, Digital Scholarship Lab, University of Richmond, and Christine Berkowitz, Lecturer, University of Toronto Scarborough

The History Engine is a pedagogically oriented project that collects “episodes”—concise vignettes about local historical events—written by undergraduate students. This presentation will highlight how this project uses digital technologies to foster collaboration among students within and between different universities, fosters inter-institutional collaboration among the many colleges that have participated in the project, and publishes student scholarship that is of interest and value to a broad public.

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History Engine 2.0: Researching Locally, Collaborating Globally Presentation Transcript

  • 1. THE HISTORY ENGINE 2.0RESEARCHING LOCALLY, COLLABORATINGGLOBALLYROBERT NELSON, DIRECTOR, DIGITAL SCHOLARSHIP LAB, UNIVERSITY OF RICHMONDCHRISTINE BERKOWITZ, DEPARTMENT OF HUMANITIES/HISTORY, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTOSCARBOROUGH
  • 2. 3873 pageviews from April 12, 2011 to April 11, 2012
  • 3. 2257 pageviews from April 12, 2011 to April 11, 2012
  • 4. 1467 pageviews from April 12, 2011 to April 11, 2012
  • 5. 1283 pageviews from April 12, 2011 to April 11, 2012
  • 6. Location: Toronto, Ontario CanadaTags: Women, media, workforce Women in Transition A Brief Look into the Conflicts Between Media Images of Women and the Working Reality in 1950s and 1960s Canada.“A woman’s place is in the home” is a phrase which dominated discourse on the roles of women for muchof the twentieth century, even when that discourse was written by women. Elizabeth Long was aprominent radio personality who retired from the CBC in 1956 and was primarily concerned withdiscussing women’s interests.1 She was also the vice president of the International Council of Women andthe Council of Women in Canada at the time. Reflecting on her own career, Long indicates that thepossibilities for women are endless provided they do their best, something which she feels they generallyaren’t doing. She believes that this is because women are in a “preferred position” and that no onegenerally thinks less of them for their failures, thus they have no incentive to succeed. She goes on to saythat the one arena in which women do usually do their best is in motherhood but that their efforts usuallytaper off when their baby is no longer a baby. Long’s view is typical of the views expressed in the media at the time, but not however reflective ofthe practical, daily experiences of women in the 1950s and 1960s. This period was one of great transitionfor women as they continued to demand rights and respect despite the pressures of the media and even
  • 7. Date: July 1988Location: Canada, South Africa, British CommonwealthTags: Apartheid, international relations Brian Mulroney, Terrorist Sympathizer? It all began with a birthday letter delivered from one political leader to another, albeit the receiving leader was in prison at thetime. In the middle of the month of July in the year 1988, Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney sent a message meant tohonour the 70th birthday of the then imprisoned African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela. The letter wished Mandela ahappy birthday and expressed Mulroney’s hopes that Mandela would soon be free and in a place of power to bring positive changeto the terribly racist South African society of the time.1 In response to this, the South African Foreign Minister R.F. Botha accusedMulroney of fraternizing with and supporting terrorism. Furthermore, Botha also added that Mulroney’s letter had also discreditedhimself as a relevant voice in the debate concerning apartheid in South Africa. Mulroney wasn’t alone with his sentiment howeveras his own External Affairs Minister Joe Clark also released a more formal statement urging the Botha government to releaseNelson Mandela as a political gesture to the world that they are willing to truly negotiate. Various other heads of state and politicalfigures echoed Mulroney and Clarks statements.2 Many from far more powerful and relevant countries to South Africa such asBritain and Germany, yet it would seem, the Botha government only directed their attention towards the Canadians. How did a Canadian prime minster become accused by another head of state of being a supporter of terrorism anyway? It wasbecause of Mr. Mulroney and Joe Clarks prominent roles in pushing the united weight of the British Commonwealth Nationsagainst the South African Government. To be fair to the National Party, of which Botha belonged, did have fair reason to declare
  • 8. http://historyengine.richmond.edu