Designing Online Resources to Enhance In-Class Interactions
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Designing Online Resources to Enhance In-Class Interactions Designing Online Resources to Enhance In-Class Interactions Presentation Transcript

  • Designing Online Resources to Enhance In-Class Interactions David Wright, Writing Specialist &Mike Winiski, Associate Director, Center for Teaching and Learning, Furman University Jeremy Donald, Faculty Technology Liaison, Trinity University NITLE Seminar September 20, 2012
  • Upcoming NITLE Seminars• FemTechNet: The First DOCC,* A Feminist MOOC, October 4, 4-5 pm EDT• Stories of the Susquehanna: Digital Humanities, Spatial Thinking, and Telling the historia of the Environment, October 9, 2-3 pm EDT• Evaluating Digital Scholarship, October 10, 4-5 pm EDT• Keep Up – Subscribe to our newsletter, The NITLE News – Check out our event page: http://www.nitle.org/events/events_list.php
  • Goals1) Examine Kolb’s Learning Cycle as model for designing learning environments (whether physical or digital) that set the stage for dynamic, rigorous, and robust in-class interactions2) Share examples of how we applied this model to develop flexible online modules to help optimize face-to-face time3) Promote dialog about the applicability of this model at participant institutions
  • Desired LearnersI want my students to show up to class . . .
  • “Reversing the Flow”“That is, we start in practice, and practice drivesus to content. Or, more likely, the optimal way tolearn is reciprocally or spirally between practiceand content.” —Randall Bass, “Disrupting Ourselves: The Problem of Learning in Higher Education” Key: Developing pedagogies that blend practice and content, both in and out of the classroom.
  • Traditional Writing Instruction Model• Give assignment.• Students write and submit essays.• Instructors grade essays and give feedback, which sometimes includes specific writing instruction.• Handbooks mostly function as remedial or supplementary resource.
  • Workshop Writing Model• Give assignment.• Students write and submit drafts for workshop.• Class workshops essays together, which sometimes includes specific writing instruction.• Students revise and resubmit essays for final evaluation.• Handbooks still mostly function as remedial or supplementary resource.
  • “Reversing the Flow” with Digital Tutorials• Provides instructors with high-quality, targeted instructional materials.• Blends writing “content” lessons (e.g. “Writing Effective Thesis Statements) with the actual practice of drafting.• Allows instructors to decide how and when to incorporate the tutorials into their classes.
  • Tutorials in Richmond’s “Writer’s Web”Thesis Statement Video Page:http://writing2.richmond.edu/writing/wweb/thesis2.htmlThesis Statement Exercises:http://writing2.richmond.edu/writing/wweb/thesisexercise.html
  • Assumptions and Notes• We drink / sip the experiential learning Kool-Aid;• We didn’t invent this;• It’s just a model, but the simplification can be useful.
  • Kolb’s Learning Cycle
  • The Learner’s View Experiencing Applying Examining Explaining*denotes student experience
  • Social Media in the Workplace (Business Writing Class)• Examine the role of social media in our professional and personal lives and its impact on how we communicate with one another• Identify traps as well as potential upsides of social media in our professional lives and develop strategies for optimizing its use
  • The Learner’s View ExperiencingApplying Examining Explaining
  • ExperiencingApplying Examining Explaining
  • ExperiencingApplying Examining Explaining
  • You’ve been working for a company for several years.During a strategy planning session, the topic of Facebookcomes up. The technology doesn’t seem to be a fit for anyof the company initiatives, so the group moves on to othertopics of discussion. You’re an avid user of Facebook andconnect with family, friends, and several co-workers withwhom you feel close. You get home that evening, log intoemail, and find a friend request from the Director ofMarketing, an attendee at the meeting earlier in the day.He’s a very well-respected member of the organization, buthe’s always made you feel uncomfortable for some reason.You aren’t sure what to do, so you ignore the request. Afew days later, you bump into this co-worker in the hallway.He asks if you’ve gotten the request. What should you do?
  • ExperiencingApplying Examining Explaining
  • Lead With Experience
  • As Instructors, We Are All Self-Taught“That is, we start in practice, and practice drivesus to content. Or, more likely, the optimal way tolearn is reciprocally or spirally between practiceand content.”—Randall Bass, “Disrupting Ourselves: The Problem of Learning in Higher Education”
  • (From Svinicki and Dixon, 1987)
  • (From Svinicki and Dixon, 1987)
  • (From Svinicki and Dixon, 1987)
  • What do you do with class time?
  • Class time for…• Targeting the understandings, content, or skills that students find most difficult• Providing low-stakes practice and feedback opportunities (emphasis on peer feedback w/ expert oversight; also an informal assessment opportunity)• Letting students build something from their meaning-making/explaining/mistake-fixing that can in turn support them in the active experimentation phase
  • Examples• Students create a set of criteria or guidelines to apply during their upcoming active experimentation• Students create a set of criteria for self- evaluation• Students create something typical to authentic practice (e.g., a research proposal, an executive summary, a spec sheet)
  • ACS Blended Learning Grant Project: Analyzing and Creating Maps http://bit.ly/NtBkup Website serves as resource for instructors, providing online materials intended for out-of- class use (tutorials, including a substantial case study, and ideas for writing prompts) as well as suggested in-class strategies. A complete sample curriculum for a two-day module on spatial thinking is also provided.Screencast Tutorials: Teacher’s Notes: Sample Curriculum:Map Literacy Writing, activity, and More-developedHistograms, etc. assignment ideas for example of anCase Study adapting into your adaptation/implemeCreating Your Own Map course ntation within a political science course.
  • Map Literacy ExampleApply yourguidelines in thewritten evaluationof a new set ofmaps, and see if the Answer questions,guidelines are reply to promptsaligned with yourown criticalresponse to themaps. Noterevisions you would Discuss homework as amake to the Working in groups, class.guidelines. create a set of guidelines for map- (Individually) write list of making that reflect pros and cons for a chosen the criteria you’ve map, using criteria you’ve worked together to developed. refine.
  • Map Literacy ExampleApply yourguidelines in thewritten evaluationof a new set ofmaps, and see if the Answer questions,guidelines are reply to promptsaligned with yourown critical (Out of class)response to themaps. Noterevisions you would Discuss homework as amake to the Working in groups, class.guidelines. create a set of guidelines for map- (Individually) write list of making that reflect pros and cons for a chosen the criteria you’ve map, using criteria you’ve worked together to developed. refine.
  • Map Literacy ExampleApply yourguidelines in thewritten evaluationof a new set ofmaps, and see if the Answer questions,guidelines are reply to promptsaligned with yourown critical (Out of class)response to themaps. Noterevisions you would (In class)make to the Working in groups, Discuss homework as aguidelines. create a set of class. guidelines for map- (Individually) write list of making that reflect pros and cons for a chosen the criteria you’ve map, using criteria you’ve worked together to developed. refine.
  • Map Literacy ExampleApply yourguidelines in thewritten evaluationof a new set ofmaps, and see if the Answer questions,guidelines are reply to promptsaligned with yourown critical (Out of class)response to the Real-time assessment/feedback opportunitiesmaps. Noterevisions you would (In class)make to the Working in groups, Discuss homework as aguidelines. create a set of class. guidelines for map- (Individually) write list of making that reflect pros and cons for a chosen the criteria you’ve map, using criteria you’ve worked together to developed. refine.
  • Map Literacy ExampleApply yourguidelines in thewritten evaluationof a new set ofmaps, and see if the Answer questions,guidelines are reply to promptsaligned with yourown critical (Out of class)response to themaps. Noterevisions you would (In class)make to the Working in groups, Discuss homework as aguidelines. create a set of class. (Homework) guidelines for map- (Individually) write list of making that reflect pros and cons for a chosen the criteria you’ve map, using criteria you’ve worked together to developed. refine.
  • writing-to-learn assignments problem-basedconceptual assignment designworkshops contextual learning experience design
  • Image Credits• online communities map - http://xkcd.com/802/• think - http://www.flickr.com/photos/jakecaptive/3205277810/• chalkboard - http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeffreywarren/297096827/• city - http://www.flickr.com/photos/holly_northrop/4278173735/• bewildered - http://www.flickr.com/photos/viydook/6094186264/
  • ReferencesBass, R. (2012). Disrupting ourselves: The problem of learning in higher education. Educause Review. Retrieved from http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/disrupting- ourselves-problem-learning-higher-educationKolb, D. A. (1983). Experiential learning: Experience as the source of learning and development (1st ed.). Prentice Hall.Svinicki, M. D., & Dixon, N. M. (1987). The Kolb model modified for classroom activities. College Teaching, 35(4), 141–146.