The Art of the Demo
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The Art of the Demo

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The Art of the Demo Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Why does a demo matter?
  • 2. Conveys your passion.
  • 3. Unveils your hard work.
  • 4. Keeps you organized.
  • 5. And if it is bad…
  • 6. Turns your audience against you.
  • 7. Makes it look like “you don’t know what you are talking about.”
  • 8. Wastes time as it loses you and your audience.
  • 9. Preparing for your demo.
  • 10. Prepare yourself. • Who is attending the demo? • Dress the part.
  • 11. Prepare your software. • Clean out test messages. • Create real-world data. • Test everything.
  • 12. Prepare your software. • Configure all settings before the demo. • It doesn’t have to be ready for the real world, but it has to be ready for the demo.
  • 13. Prepare your system. • Close anything that may make noise or display pop-up messages.
  • 14. Prepare your setting.
  • 15. Prepare your story.
  • 16. The big day is here!
  • 17. Give a good overview. • Thank the audience for attending. • Set expectations without badmouthing yourself or the software. • Show the main screen and talk about what the software or feature does.
  • 18. Stay out of the settings.
  • 19. Work through use cases or scenarios.
  • 20. Show enough to give the audience an idea of what the software does without showing everything.
  • 21. This is a demo, not training.
  • 22. Point out where data comes from or is reused.
  • 23. Stay out of the weeds.
  • 24. Tell the story from the user’s viewpoint.
  • 25. Focus on how to use a feature, not how it was designed.
  • 26. It doesn’t matter what you did if they don’t know why you did it.
  • 27. Be flexible.
  • 28. Keep everyone on task.
  • 29. Squirrel!
  • 30. End the story.
  • 31. Don’t start with a blank screen.
  • 32. Don’t dive into settings and configuration screens.
  • 33. Don’t show the same thing over and over
  • 34. Questions?
  • 35. Thank you! Robert Rhyne Armstrong @ninety7 – facebook.com/rhyne rhynearmstrong@gmail.com