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Asian Americans in Music Asian Americans in Music Document Transcript

  • ASIAN AMERICANS IN MUSIC Nina Chan
  • features INTRODUCTION PROBLEM STATEMENT SIGNIFICANCE OF PROJECT PROJECT SCOPE NEED ASSESSMENT RESEARCH METHODOLOGY DEFINITION OF TERMS DESIGN DRIVERS SCHEDULE/TIME COST CHART RESEARCH PRODUCT ASSESSMENT MATRIX INFLUENCE MAP IDEATION FUNCTIONAL FLOW DIAGRAM PRELIMINARY PROTOTYPES FINAL PROTOTYPE CONCLUSION BIBLIOGRAPHY 1 2 3 3 4 7 7 8 10 22 26 34 39 40 46 68 81 NINA CHAN DAI 505 - LINDER SPRING 2011 ASIAN AMERICANS IN MUSIC
  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 1 PROBLEM STATEMENT: Asian American music artists lack media exposure and have difficulty standing out in the mainstream music industry. PURPOSE STATEMENT: This study was done to design a product showcasing Asian American music artists in a positive and empowering light — breaking preconceived stereo- types and adding diversity to the current music industry. Ever since I started college, I have been consistently active in the Asian American community. I was first exposed to Asian American issues through the Asian American Studies and Ethnic Studies courses provided here at San Francisco State University. It was astounding how much history I lacked knowl- edge of throughout grade school. I wondered, why was I never exposed to any of these issues or problems affecting these community of people? Being a second generation Asian American, growing up and dealing with society’s perceptions of myself and my culture can create a sense of inner conflict and duality. There are constant stereotypes and assumptions placed on Asian Americans, and a large reason for this is their lack of media exposure. For this project, I wanted to address the importance of Asian Americans in the media – in the entertain- ment industry, television, film, music, as well as in sports. However, I will zone in on a specific aspect of the entertainment industry and focus on the lack of exposure for Asian American musicians. The reason I’m choosing musicians is because their talent is heard through the ears and not the eyes. Though people under the limelight in the music industry must adhere to a set of standards in terms of appearance and stage presence, that raw musical talent must be there also. It is tough to enter the music industry in general, but it is even tougher to enter as an Asian American. They are often deemed as undesirable and much harder to market, because they are still seen as “foreign” and an “outsider”. How do we break these preconceived stereotypes? I recall at a young age flipping through magazines and wondering, why don’t I see any “familiar faces” (i.e. other Asian Americans)? All of the people who graced the covers of magazines, billboards, and television were primarily Caucasian or African American. I feel that for young Asian Americans, they need to see some positive role models in their lives, especially depicted in the media. Therefore, my de- sign solution to this project is to create a magazine dedicated to Asian Americans in music and the arts – to showcase their talent as well as providing an outlet for young Asian Americans to find role models. INTRODUCTION
  • SIGNIFICANCE OF PROJECT: This project will impact Asian American music artists, the Asian American community, and the music industry in terms of creativity, innovation, and diversity. • Creative/Innovation Impact: This project will have a creative impact in the music industry by offering a unique blend of music that is rarely seen in mainstream music • Economic Impact: By adding diversity into the music market and providing people with new mu- sic, this will generate more sales. In addition, this will be targeting Asian Americans, who hold strong and often untapped economic power. • Cultural Impact: Since this project will be focused on showcasing talented Asian American music artists, the public will be exposed to a more diverse group of musicians. We seldom see Asian American artists in mainstream media, so this exposure can break stereotypes and empower people to follow their dreams. • Societal Impact:The more the general public is exposed to Asian Americans as part of our society and mainstream music, the more people will be accepting of them and not view them as “foreign”. PROJECT SCOPE: Duration of this project: January 24, 2011 – May 18, 2011 Project Manager: Nina Chan Constraints: Time, technical skills, budget What is within my project scope? • Bay Area Asian American music artists and independent music labels • Varying genres: Pop, Rock, R&B, Hip Hop, Alternative • High school and college Students • People ages 15-30 • Asian American youth • People seeking to find new music artists • Print material What is not within my project scope? • Non-Asian American artists • People ages 30+ • People not interested in the music industry Needs Assessment: • Does my target need this product? • How does this benefit the user? • How will the user use this product? • Where will the product be placed, sold, used? • Does it use a lot of material to produce? • What is the product’s lifespan? Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 3 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 2
  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 5 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 4 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY: Research Methodology/Tools: I used two methods of research throughout this project for data collection and analysis: in-person research and literature research. In-person includes shadowing and interviews with Asian American musicians as well as people within my target audience focus group. In addition, I have consulted Asian American Studies Department Chair, Lorraine Dong, and Professor Valerie Soe, using their expertise in this field of study to benefit my design solution. I first attended a few music sessions with Mind Harmony Production, an Asian American music label, and their clients as well as attending venues and events where these musicians perform. This process allowed me to dig deeper and receive an in-depth idea of what goes on during music sessions and what needs are most prevalent for both parties – for the producer and the music artist to stand out. Interviews were conducted casually through conversations and email. I docu- mented these meetings by taking pictures of their music sessions, their conversations, and the general organization of producing music as independent artists. Music artists I interviewed are listed below: Artists Interviewed: Patrick Orara – Electronic artist/Rapper Bonnie Wong – Singer/Songwriter Alan Kao – Alternative Rock William Kwok – Music Producer The literature research included: music-centric magazines, books about the music industry, websites about other independent music labels, academic journals, and news articles. What I tried to grasp from reading books and magazines like Billboard is to be aware of current trends, what’s popular in the market, and learning other label’s marketing techniques. Billboard Magazine is a weekly circulated pre- mier trade publication for the music business. They focus primarily on the music business: “publishing news, analysis trend reporting and other key features, as well as Billboard’s famous standard-setting charts of U.S. sales, airplay, downloads, and box office grosses.” Based on other label’s websites, I compared and contrasted what makes them successful, what sets them apart, and their overall design appeal – from logo, brand identity, color palette, their tone, mood, and feel. Shadowing Mind Harmony Productions
  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 7 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 6 Urban Paradise 2011 Host: The Company Where: San Mateo Performing Arts Center When: Saturday, March 19 – 7:00-10:00pm What: Various Asian American dance groups from the Bay Area all the way down to Los Angeles join to- gether one night to perform. Korean Cultural Night Host: Korean Student Association Where: San Francisco State University When: Friday, April 22 – 6:00-8:30pm What: KCN is where they bring Korean, Korean-American, and Korean cultured artists under one roof to perform wondrous acts. A portion of their proceeds will be donated to KAWAWA (Korean American Women Artists & Writer Association) API: Movements of Heritage Host: Asian Student Union Where: San Francisco State University When: Friday May 6 – 6:00-10:00pm What: The event focuses on showcasing and supporting Asian American artists. In addi- tion, the proceeds (monetary donations) from this event will be going to Center for the Pacific Asian Family, also known Events Attended: DEFINITION OF TERMS: Asian American: An American who is of Asian descent Model Minority: Model minority refers to a minority ethnic, racial, or religious group whose members achieve a higher degree of success than the population average Stereotypes: A stereotype is a commonly held public belief about specific social groups, or types of individuals Music Industry: The music industry or music business sells compositions, recordings and perfor- mances of music. DESIGN DRIVERS: Forms and Features: • Visibility • Application • Distinctive • Simplicity • Universality • Retention • Color • International/National Standards • Print and Virtual Functional Requirement Communicate information effectively Demographic:: Resonate with Asian American target audience
  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 9 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 8 SCHEDULE & TIME COST CHART: Name Begin Date End Date Planning 1/24/11 5/11/11 Critique Meetings 1/24/11 5/11/11 Initial Scheduling 1/24/11 1/26/11 Project Introduction 1/26/11 1/31/11 Impact Statement 1/31/11 2/2/11 Project Scope 2/2/11 2/7/11 Assessment Matrix 2/7/11 2/14/11 Research 2/9/11 3/30/11 General Info Gathering 2/9/11 2/16/11 Surveys 2/28/11 3/1/11 Interviews 3/1/11 4/27/11 Photographic Documentation 4/20/11 5/12/11 Initial Concept 2/21/11 3/22/11 Concept Planning 2/21/11 3/22/11 Ideations 3/22/11 3/30/11 Roughs 4/4/11 4/11/11 Comprehensives 4/11/11 4/27/11 Revision 5/2/11 5/12/11 Final Design 5/12/11 5/14/11 Printing 5/12/11 5/13/11 Presentation 5/16/11 5/16/11 Week Hours Week 1: 1/24-1/30 9 Week 2: 1/31-2/6 14 Week 3: 2/7-2/13 15 Week 4: 2/14-2/20 19 Week 5: 2/21-2/27 23 Week 6: 2/28-3/6 24 Week 7: 3/7-3/13 21 Week 8: 3/14-3/20 14 Week 9: 3/21-3/27 9 Week 10: 3/28-4/3 15 Week 11: 4/4-4/10 19 Week 12: 4/11-4/17 18 Week 13: 4/18-4/24 18 Weel 14: 4/25-5/1 33 Week 15: 5/2-5/8 25 Week 16: 5/9-5/15 39 Total Hours: 315 Rate: $50.00 Total Amount: $15,700
  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 11 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 10 RESEARCH: PHASE ONE RESEARCH Phase One: I began this research by analyzing several successful prominent music labels as well as local independent music labels. This study will furthered my understanding of their presence in the music market and how they each dif- ferentiate their brand from their competitors. Based on the 2005 report by Nielsen SoundScan, the top three music labels in the United States are: Universal Music Group (37%), Sony BMG Entertainment (25%), and Warner Music Group (15%). They comprise nearly two-thirds of the U.S. music market shares. Within each of these ma- jor record companies, they each have their own subcategories of individual labels that represent certain styles of music and are specific in their roster of artists and image. For example, under the parent tree of Universal Music Group are labels such as Interscope (pop), The Island Def Jam Music Group (Hip Hop), and The Verve Music Group (jazz). According to Billboard Magazine, the top trends in the music industry at the moment include: digital music ser- vices, applications, the iPad, and social networking. Billboard Magazine mentions that record labels currently looking for new methods of distribution and marketing are finding the “multiplatform app environment a perfect solution for reach fans across the digital landscape.” Most applications can be found in smartphones or other devices such as the iPhone and iPad. This mobile device has much potential, making labels, artists, and de- velopers excited about what the outcome can bring in terms of music discovery, engagement, experience and creation. Social media has been a huge buzz word around the internet in the past year and it probably won’t go away soon, especially with the impact it is making on product marketing and spreading awareness. As for independent music labels, they comprise about 18% of the music market share. Though this is a small amount compared to the major labels, there is still a large amount of independent labels to compete against. To narrow down the research, we will look at a few separate independent music labels that are relevant to the inter- est and direction of Mind Harmony Production. The following independent labels are also based in California or the Bay Area: 454 Entertainment, MYX Music Label, Cherrytree Records. All of these labels have an extremely niche focus, which allows them to successfully target and market to their fans. In addition to examining these labels, I also looked into other organizations or media companies (4C The Power and WongFu Productions), with similar focus and mission, and analyzed their marketing and design strategies. EMI Warner Music Group Sony Music Independent Labels Universal Music Group 32% 18% 26% 15% 9% U.S. Music Market Shares:
  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 13 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 12 SURVEY FINDINGS: Survey Questions 1. Age 2. Ethnicity 3. Religion 4. Place you grew up 5. Do you think Asian Americans are underrepresented in mainstream music? 6. Are you able to name 3 Asian American artists in the music industry? 7. If your answer was “yes” to the previous question, what are their names and what genre? 8. Why do you think Asian Americans may not be represented in music? 9. Do you think there’s a need for more Asian American artists to be represented in mainstream music? 10. Do you tink society will be more open to artists of all different background in the future? Data Collected From: 59 Total Surveyed: Age Range: Southern California Out of State Bay Area 84% 7% 8% Location:
  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 15 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 14 Caucasian Southeast Asians Mixed Filipino Chinese 45% 25% 12% 10% 8% Ethnicity: 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 Mix of the two External reasons by the industry itself Internal reasons within the Asian American community 10.5% 28.1% 70.2% Why do you think that Asian Americans are not represented in music? 1/2 of the people surveyed were unable to name 3 Asian American music artist. What are some other reasons? Comments from respondents: “There is a small Asian-American community, population-wise. Companies are reluctant to hire someone who may seem culturally non-mainstream. Also, because many areas have few or no Asians, many industry people do not have a chance to overcome ignorant feelings of racism. They may also be less able to relate to Asian-Americans because they are not exposed to their culture. “ “Even if Asian Americans are represented, often times, people see them as “Asian” and they aren’t accepted in the same way as mainstream artists. They are *confined* as an “Asian musician” instead of as just a “musician.” “I would say that it’s more along the lines of what people have come to expect from hip-hop/ pop music. It started as a predominantly African American subculture that went mainstream. As it became more acceptable in popular culture, all ethnicities hopped on board. It seems that Asian Americans are beginning to be recognized, but it’s clearly in its infancy.” “It always seem to be an east versus west problem, there’s no middle category that we Asian Americans can fit in.” “Culture, maturity, lack of industry support”Left-Right: Far*East Movement, Jin, Bruno Mars
  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 17 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 16 Phase Two: As I continued researching the music industry, shadowing the music artists and producers, and speaking to vari- ous individuals, I noticed a common theme and conversation that always came up: the difficulty of entering the music industry as an Asian American. Through extensive research, articles, and journals by professors and the musicians themselves, I have developed a deeper understanding of the intricacies of the music industry as well as the factors that create such barriers for Asian Americans to rise. Based on my survey findings of 59 respondents, about two-thirds are between the ages 21-35 and one-third are ages 16-20. I chose to survey people high school to college-aged because young people have the hugest influence in the music industry. The people interviewed are from the Bay Area (84%), Southern California (8%), and out-of-state (7%). Half of the group were unable to name at least 3 Asian American music artists. What is even more overwhelming is the lack of Asian American woman in the music industry. Most people listed Far East Movement and Bruno Mars since they were able to break through and succeed by creating chart topping hits, catchy lyrics, and shattering stereotypes. When presented the question, “Why do you think that Asian Americans are not represented in music?”, about 10% believed it to be internal reasons within the Asian American com- munity, 28% believed it has to do with external reasons by the industry itself, and 70% said that it is a mix of the two reasons. If we take a look back at the history of American music in the past century, we rarely see any Asian Americans in the industry. Michael Endelman, senior editor at Rolling Stone, explains, “American pop music has for decades been white and black pop stars. Generally, Asian Americans haven’t been in the music industry in a significant way. You go back to the great pop and rock in the first wave of the great labels of the ‘50s, ‘60s, and ‘80s – there’s just no history to it.” Music serves as a form of expression for people to voice their experiences and feelings. In the past, we have seen African Americans pioneer musical movements such as blues, jazz, and rap. These genres were created through the African American experience and are uniquely grounded in the African American history. Christine Balance, Asian American studies professor at University of California, Irvine, notes that “Latin and black music have longstanding currency in the industry, but there’s nothing comparable for Asian Americans. How do you market an Asian American star? African Americans are foundational to U.S. popular culture, and for Latinos there’s the adjective “Latin” music that’s used to describe a variety of musical forms. But Asians are still seen as foreign or alien to mainstream America.” Jon Caramanica of Vibe Magazine explains, “By and large the music industry hasn’t done a great job cultivating Asian-American talent, because there’s no signifi- cant tradition in the mainstream, it becomes that much harder to become that breakthrough artist.” American pop music has for decades been white and black pop stars. Generally, Asian Americans haven’t been in the music industry in a signifi- cant way. You go back to the great pop and rock in the first wave of the great labels of the ‘50s, ‘60s, and ‘80s – there’s just no history to it. - Michael Endelman, senior editor at Rolling Stone Left-Right: Louis Armstrong, Madonna, Led Zepplin
  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 19 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 18 Phase Two (cont.): So, what is preventing Asian Americans from entering the mainstream and why is there a lack of exposure? Music industry executives do not have a ready explanation for this, but Asian American artists and scholars pin point to racial stereotypes as a major factor. Asian Americans have faced a long history of racial discrimination and were stereotyped under the model minority myth. Asians are stereotyped to be: passive, submissive, studious geeks, mathematicians, scientists, practice martial arts, etc. It is the perception that somebody who looks Asian must be a foreigner. The term “model minority” was coined by sociologist William Peterson. The model minority myth states that “people of this particular minority group achieve a higher degree of success than the population aver- age.” This implies that these people are successful academic overachievers who are well off financially. Therefore, this allows society to assume that Asian Americans do not need any extra help. They are typically seen pursuing careers in math, science, and engineering rather than a career in the performing arts. At a young age, children are easily influence by the people they see on their television screens and who they hear on the radio. There are not too many films with a strong Asian American lead role. Aside from martial arts films, featuring stars like Jackie Chan and Jet Li, there is an obvious absence of Asian-Americans in American pop culture. There are television shows such as American Idol, featuring a diverse group of talented singers who compete for national stardom to be the number one singer. Although there were a few Asian Americans featured, the only name people can remember or think of is William Hung, who sang an off-key rendition of Ricky Martin’s “She Bangs”. He was embarrassing to watch and there was a collective cringe from the Asian American commu- nity whenever Hung’s name was mentioned. Another popular Asian American woman who found fame through MTV is Tila “Tequila” Nguyen, who starred in a reality television series as a provocative, overly sexual, and raunchy woman in search of love. She eventually used the fame garnered from her series and turned toward a career in music, which unfortunately flopped. Both Hung and Nguyen were not images that Asian Americans wanted to represent them, because they only resonated the racial stereotypes placed upon the community. According to Steve Wei, a Taiwanese-American graduate of Temple University, “Hollywood and pop culture shape your identity as a young child. Increasing the number of Asian-Americans in positions of role-models fre- quently found in the entertainment industry has the potential to give Asian-American children a chance to identity with someone like themselves that’s famous.” Wei is part of a rap group, along with Scott Jung and Chris Wang, called Mountain Brothers. They are signed to Ruffhouse, a sub-label of Columbia Records, which is one of the nation’s most reputable record labels. This makes them the first all-Asian-American rap group to sign to a major record label. Another duo taking positive strides and helping Asian-American musicians are Andy Kawanami and Nelson Wong. They are the creators fo AArising Records, which is a record label dedicated to showcasing the talent of Asian-Americans. Their goal is to “diversify the Asian Pacific American images out there. The more images you have out there the less chance that someone will be able to stereotype Asian Pacific Americans as being a certain way”. Since it is difficult for Asian Americans to step foot into the industry, they have decided to use different platforms and mediums to produce, market, and show off their talent. The growing popularity of the internet has enabled and opened the door for a new generation of Asian Americans to be producers of their own culture. Many have taken to Youtube, which has become a mini-industry in itself, to reach out and build their fan base. Some notable Asian Americans who have found success through Youtube include: David Choi (790,000+ subscribers, 10.9 million views) Traphik (766,000+ subscribers, 46.7 million views) JR Aquino (295,000+ subscribers, 2.4 million views) Cathy Nguyen (212,000+ subscribers, 4.8 million views) Erika David (187,000+ subscribers, 4.7 million views) JosephVincent (180,000+ subscribers, 2.9 million views) Lil Crazed (145,000+ subscribers, 3.2 million views) Jennifer Chung (134,000+ subscribers, 3.3 million views) Clara Chung (108,000+ subscribers, 1.3 million views) DAVID CHOI CATHY NGUYEN TRAPHIK JR AQUINO MICHELLE MARTINEZ ERIKA DAVID
  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 21 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 20 Quotes from Asian American music artists: “I was told over and over again by countless label executives that if it weren’t for me being Asian, I would’ve been signed yester- day.” - Paul Kim, Korean-American American Idol Contestant “Would it be easier if you were black or white? Of course it would be a lot easier because there is a track record for black or white artists, for an Asian art- ist, especially in America, you don’t have a track record. Like any business, a lot of labels say how can we invest in something that we don’t know any history in?” - James Roh, Far East Movement “Rightnow,we’reatatimewhen we’re just bubbling. When all Asian artists come together and start to realize each other’s work ethics, it’s going to be great.” - SonnyThongoulay, Laotian American rapper “The first thing people think of when it comes to Asian emcees is that it’s almost like an oxymoron. Hip-hop was created out of poverty, and this whole idea that Asian Americans are the model mi- norities, leads to the belief that they can’t possibly have struggles to talk about.” - GordonTsai, Chinese American rapper
  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 23 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 22 PRODUCT ASSESSMENT MATRIX: Company Name: 454 Entertainment MYX Music Label Cherry Tree Records Logo Design Company Record Label Record Label Record Label Company Launch 2008 2007 2005 Description Bay Area born and bred, but internationally known, 454 Life Entertainment is a record label that represents a breakthrough voice from the streets. There has never been an urban music label like this before. 454 Life Entertainment is a movement that aims to smash stereotypes and speaks for all the people in the struggle all over the world. The label has already begun to amass the freshest in International talent, from artists to songwriters to producers. MYX® was developed by ABS- CBN International, a US-based subsidiary ABS-CBN Broadcasting which is the largest media company in the Philippines and among the largest in Asia. MYX® is the only music entertainment and lifestyle channel dedicated to the Asian American community, utilizing music, culture and entertainment. MYX® can be seen on Channel 368 on Comcast’s Digital Preferred Tier in the San Francisco Bay Area, Comcast ON DEMAND, Cox Digital Basic Cable, DIRECTV 2067 and RCN. Cherry Tree is an American record label and is an imprint of Interscope Records. Cherrytree Records was founded in 2005 by Martin Kierszenbaum. The label focuses on new artists with growth potential. Mission/Goal Break stereotypes Showcase Asian American talent Focus on new artists with growth potential Website www.454.vn www.myxmusiclabel.com www.cherrytreerecords.com Twitter √ √ √ Genre(s) Urban music, rap, hip hop Urban music, rock, hip hop, rap Pop, Alternative, Dance Marketing Tools Youtube, Facebook, Twitter Youtube, Facebook, Twitter, Events Youtube, Facebook, Twitter Impact Cultural, Societal, Economic Cultural, Societal, Economic Cultural, Societal, Economic Cherry Tree Records 4C The Power WongFu Productions Record Label Non-Profit Organization Video Production 2005 n/a 2004 Cherry Tree is an American record label and is an imprint of Interscope Records. Cherrytree Records was founded in 2005 by Martin Kierszenbaum. The label focuses on new artists with growth potential. A non-profit program under the umbrella of iMovement Foundation. The mission of 4C the Power is to connect youth with their schools and communities through the arts to create stronger and more self- sustaining communities. The 4 "C"s are Culture. Creativity. Community and Career WongFu Productions is an Asian American filmmaking group. We are a growing independent production company working fulltime on various parts of our business. They create short films, music videos, vlogs; writing, directing, editing, everything on their own. As emerging artists and filmmakers, we hope to continue to improve our craft, grow as a company, and reach people with our work. Focus on new artists with growth potential Connect youth with their schools and communities through the arts to create stronger and more self sustaining communities To have a positive influence in the industry www.cherrytreerecords.com www.4cthepower.com www.wongfuproductions.com √ √ √ Pop, Alternative, Dance Education, entertainment, music Varied Youtube, Facebook, Twitter Youtube, Facebook, Twitter, promotional events, tours Youtube, Facebook, Twitter, campus tours, music events, concerts Cultural, Societal, Economic Educational Cultural, Societal, Economic, Educational 

  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 25 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 24 Company Name: Audrey Magazine Hyphen Giant Robot KoreAm Thirteen Minutes Magazine Design Publication Print/Online Print/Online Print/Online Print/Online Print/Online Company Launch 2003 2002 1994 1990 2006 Description Audrey Magazine is an award-winning national publication created by Asian American women, for Asian American women. Now in its eighth year of publication, Audrey Magazine has become the go-to publication for the modern Asian American women intent on establishing and reinforcing her roots and getting in touch with the Asian American culture. Whether it’s current social issues, profiles on the must-know Asian Americans of the day, or the latest in cutting- edge fashion and beauty, Audrey Magazine has readers coming back for more with every issue. Asian American magazine that covers arts, culture and politics with substance, style and sass. We are run entirely by volunteers. Giant Robot is a bi-monthly magazine of Asian and Asian American popular culture founded by Eric Nakamura and Martin Wong in 1994. It was initially created as a small, punk-minded magazine that featured Asian pop culture and Asian American alternative culture, including such varied subject matter as history, art, music, film, books, toys, technology, food and skateboarding. KoreAm Journal is an award- winning monthly magazine that covers and analyzes the news, culture, entertainment, sports, politics and people of Korean America. Thirteen Minutes Magazine is a magazine published by IMatrix Inc. in the United States which covers high fashion, Asian women’s beauty, movies/tv, food, and popular culture. (13 Minutes) is a new magazine about bicultural Asians and those interested in Asian culture. Website audreymagazine.com Hyphenmagazine.com Giantrobot.com IamKoream.com 13minutesmag.com Twitter √ √ √ √ √ Impact Cultural, Societal, Educational, Economic Cultural, Societal, Economic Cultural, Societal, Economic Educational, Cultural Cultural, Societal, Economic, Educational Company Name: Audrey Magazine Hyphen Giant Robot KoreAm Thirteen Minutes Magazine Design Publication Print/Online Print/Online Print/Online Print/Online Print/Online Company Launch 2003 2002 1994 1990 2006 Description Audrey Magazine is an award-winning national publication created by Asian American women, for Asian American women. Now in its eighth year of publication, Audrey Magazine has become the go-to publication for the modern Asian American women intent on establishing and reinforcing her roots and getting in touch with the Asian American culture. Whether it’s current social issues, profiles on the must-know Asian Americans of the day, or the latest in cutting- edge fashion and beauty, Audrey Magazine has readers coming back for more with every issue. Asian American magazine that covers arts, culture and politics with substance, style and sass. We are run entirely by volunteers. Giant Robot is a bi-monthly magazine of Asian and Asian American popular culture founded by Eric Nakamura and Martin Wong in 1994. It was initially created as a small, punk-minded magazine that featured Asian pop culture and Asian American alternative culture, including such varied subject matter as history, art, music, film, books, toys, technology, food and skateboarding. KoreAm Journal is an award- winning monthly magazine that covers and analyzes the news, culture, entertainment, sports, politics and people of Korean America. Thirteen Minutes Magazine is a magazine published by IMatrix Inc. in the United States which covers high fashion, Asian women’s beauty, movies/tv, food, and popular culture. (13 Minutes) is a new magazine about bicultural Asians and those interested in Asian culture. Website audreymagazine.com Hyphenmagazine.com Giantrobot.com IamKoream.com 13minutesmag.com Twitter √ √ √ √ √ Impact Cultural, Societal, Educational, Economic Cultural, Societal, Economic Cultural, Societal, Economic Educational, Cultural Cultural, Societal, Economic, Educational
  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 27 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 26 INFLUENCE MAPPING: While looking around and gathering images and things that will inspire my project, I started to catego- rize all of my findings. The categories I created were: Anti-Stereotypes, Layouts, Live Events, Musical Instruments, Posters, and Texture/Style. Anti-Stereotypes Since my project is about Asian Americans in the music industry I started researching for reasons behind their lack of visibility in the media. A major problem is the fact that they have been marginal- ized and racially stereotyped for a long time. It has been a longstanding barrier for Asians competing for their place in the entertainment industry. I began to branch out and thought about other types of stereotypes out there and examined how they are being turned around. Recently, a movie came out called The Social Network, which chronicles the success of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerburg. Although this movie is mainly about the development of Facebook, it also helps glorify computer sci- ence and the “nerdy” image. For the longest time, computer science people were seen as anti-social geeks, loners, and undesirable. This movie broke most of those stereotypes and made the computer programmer appear “trendy”. Another image I found is of the computer engineer Barbie. The doll has been stereotyped as a dumb blonde and superficial. According to Mattel, they hope that this Barbie “inspires a new generation of girls to explore this important high-tech industry, which continues to grow and need future leaders.” Layouts Most of these editorial layouts were found from an UC Irvine organization where they promote and showcase Asian Americans making a difference in their campus. The designs and photography used in these layouts are wonderfully displayed and really has a positive feel to them. I like the energy and mood it exudes. I’ve also included two Hyphen Magazine covers for inspirations. Live Events Since musicians will eventually spend a lot of their time performing in venues and in front of crowds, I felt like it would be interesting to examine these places and gain some inspiration from the world of performance. The photos I chose are powerful, shows talent, and connection between people. Musical Instruments Next, I shadowed some musicians during their studio sessions and got some inspiration from the equip- ment and instruments they use to produce their music. The design and texture of the soundboards, micro- phones, and speakers were very interesting. I felt they could be possible graphics to use for my information coding. Posters I looked around for music festival posters that really spoke out to me and my project. I want to promote diversity and showcase talented Asian American artists. The first one with the music note and various flags from different countries is very powerful and aesthetically pleasing to look at. I tried to find inspiration in the posters for Asian American Film Festival. They are beautifully designed, but doesn’t use too much of the “stereotypical” Asian motifs or designs. Rather, it is subtle but still sticks to their roots without being overbearing. Texture/Style Lastly, I browsed for colors, style, and texture that I can use for my final product design. I found inspiration through some album covers, Asian American dancers, and traditional Asian culture styles. I want to utilize many different colors to convey a sense of diversity and talent.
  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 29 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 28
  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 31 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 30 influence map stereotypes
  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 33 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 32
  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 35 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 34 • Design an event to showcase Asian American musi- cians • Promotional materials for event: • Posters • Slogans/Taglines • Flyers • Pamphlets/Brochures • Pins • Wristband design to promote diversity in music (sim- ilar to Livestrong) • Website • Mobile Application – Features new and upcoming musicians • Annual Booklet – Features influential Asian American musicans in the community • Youtube Channel – Collaboration of various young Asian American artists • Conference event • Online Magazine • Magazine (similar to Billboard that features Asian American artists) • Social Media Campaign: • Twitter • Facebook • Youtube • Blog • Photo/Poster campaign • Mind Harmony Production (focus on specific label) • Website • Logo • Press/Media Kit • Billboard advertisements • Guerilla advertisements: • Bus stop ads • Bus ads • Escalator ads • Subway billboards • Bumper stickers • Use the idea of the typical “Asian Stereotype” and turn it around: • Asian Male Singers – from “un-masculine” to “tal- ented and sexy” • Redefine what “American music” is – How does it integrate itself into other cultures? How do you make the idea of Asians not “foreign” • Limited edition CDs that can become collect- ables • Design a community outreach program for music and the arts • Headphone design – it promotes new artists, while showing you how that kind of music gets to you • Calendar designs • Asian American music radio station • iPhone/iPod skins that feature various artists • Laptop skins • Slogan campaign: “Fit in. Stand Out.” – can be used and placed on various products and posters • TV Campaign – commercials • TV Show – similar to BET about Asian American artists, featuring big names to smaller and local artists • =/= (____ does not equal_____) – a campaign that refutes stereotypes and preconceived as- sumptions. • Equality in all music campaign • “Many songs. One Voice” • All artists from different sounds and walks of life • The many songs of everyone • Voices of innovation/change campaign • Collaboration CD Box Set featuring Asian Ameri- can artists of different genres – pamphlet, book- let, biographies, posters IDEATIONS: Ideation mindmap
  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 37 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 36 TOP IDEA CHOICES: Collaborative CD Box Set: • Feature Asian American music artists • Different genres • Includes biographies, poster, and booklet Campaigns: • ____does not equal____ (≠) Asian American music ≠ Foreign music Campaign refutes stereotypes and preconceived assumptions • “Fit in. Stand out.” Campaign Music Event: • Design an event that showcases Asian American talent • Promotional materials: posters, slogan, flyers, brochures, pins Magazine Design: • Design a magazine that caters to Asian American youth • Feature the most current, culturally relevant, and engaging AA artists • Feature local and national music events • Include bios, short articles, music reviews, pictures DESIGN DIRECTION/IDEAS: Design a print magazine featuring the most current, culturally relevant, and engaging Asian American artists today. Where will I be circulating these magazines? College campuses Asian American student organizations Asian American Studies classes Center for Asian American Media (CAAM) Bookstores Borders Barnes & Noble Public Libraries The “Asian American landscape” Social change Identity perceived Envision the kind of magazine we always wanted to read Interviews with Asian American artists Discovering your roots Articles Issues within the Asian American community Spotlight on events and Asian Americans making a difference Goals Shatter/dispose of myths and stereotypes that exists Medium for discussion, ideas, and concerns Highlight and showcase talents and successes Celebration of unique experiences, empower our identity and style
  • KEY STAKEHOLDERS The User Store that sells the magazine The music artists AIM Magazine College Campuses PROMOTION STRATEGY Online Bookstores & Libraries THE USER College Student Notices magazine on the rack AIM catches their attention Inspired Influenced Empowered Press/Media Write-up MUSIC ARTISTS Exposure to many new artists and events Merchandise CD Sales Further research these new artists Raise followers and awareness Word-of-Mouth Promotion Asian American Music Magazine Furthur support the campaign and cause FUNCTIONAL FLOW DIAGRAM:ELEMENTS OF A MAGAZINE DESIGN: Different sections of a magazine: Cover stories Letter from the editor Advertisements Highlights Cover design: Title, logo Photographs/Art/Illustrations Taglines/Blurbs/Teasers QR Code Barcode Date A good cover needs to accomplish 4 things: Identity the personality of the magazine Attract the target audience Lure the reader into the magazine Establish a visual identity Vocabulary: Masthead (title) Typesetting/Typography Layout Nameplate/logo Bleed Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 39 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 38
  • PROTOTYPES Magazine cover prototype with Patrick Murasaki Magazine cover prototype with Seeking Empire Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 41 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 40
  • First ideations of magazine layout Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 43 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 42
  • Comments and Feedback: • The design looks too “clean and orderly” • The magazine has more of a “symphony-like” feel rather than a magazine about pop and rock music that resonates witha younger audience • Evenly divided pages are not working really well • Should look more “dynamic” • As for “advertisements”, I should come up with one that’s more original • The AIM logo on the top felt out of place on the right hand side • The rectangular bounding box around the text is distracting and overwhelming • Make it look more breakthrough, energetic, and loud • Justify my colors, style, and have rationale for my design decisions • Think about my target audience • There are too many typefaces throughout the different pages -- need consistency Prototypes and spread designs in process Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 45 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 44
  • FINAL PROTOTYPE
  • features LETTER FROM THE EDITOR THE LOCAL SCENE FEATURED ARTISTS SPOTLIGHT ON EVENTS 4 5 6 16 6 14 STATE-OF-THE-ART SOUND
  • Ever since I started college, I have been consistently active in the Asian American community. I was first exposed to Asian American issues through the Asian American Studies and Ethnic Stud- ies courses provided here at San Francisco State University. It was astounding how much history I lacked knowledge of throughout grade school. I wondered, why was I never exposed to any of these issues or problems affecting these community of people? Being a second generation Asian Ameri- can, growing up and dealing with society’s perceptions of myself and my culture can create a sense of inner conflict and duality. There are constant stereotypes and assumptions placed on Asian Ameri- cans, and a large reason for this is their lack of media exposure. For this project, I wanted to address the importance of Asian Americans in the media – in the enter- tainment industry, television, film, music, as well as in sports. However, I will zone in on a specific aspect of the entertainment industry and focus on the lack of exposure for Asian American musi- cians. The reason I’m choosing musicians is because their talent is heard through the ears and not the eyes. Though people under the limelight in the music industry must adhere to a set of standards in terms of appearance and stage presence, that raw musical talent must be there also. It is tough to enter the music industry in general, but it is even tougher to enter as an Asian American. They are often deemed as undesirable and much harder to market, because they are still seen as “foreign” and an “outsider”. How do we break these preconceived stereotypes? I recall at a young age flipping through magazines and wondering, why don’t I see any “familiar fac- es” (i.e. other Asian Americans)? All of the people who graced the covers of magazines, billboards, and television were primarily Caucasian or African American. I feel that for young Asian Americans, they need to see some positive role models in their lives, especially depicted in the media. Therefore, my design solution to this project is to create a magazine dedicated to Asian Americans in music and the arts – to showcase their talent as well as providing an outlet for young Asian Americans to find role models. 5/6 San Francisco State University Asian Student Union API: Movements of Heritage 5/17 San Francisco Asian American Film Festival Japantown Peace Plaza 5/25 San Jose (re)present 2011 Theatre on San Pedro Square 7th Annual Asian Heritage Street Celebration Artist Preview Show When: April 30th 6pm - 9pm Where: Minna 111 Gallery San Francisco, CA 94105 Krunk Fu Battle Battle When: May 12 - June 26 Where: East West Players 120 Judge John Aiso St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 Nikkei Matsuri San Jose Japantown When: May 1, 2011 Where: 5th and Jackson Streets, San Jose, CA 95112 the local sceneetter from editor Nina Chan, Editor Welcome! 54
  • Genre: Rock, Alternative, Pop Members: Nikki Aclaro Phil Pristia Paul Thomas Alan Kao Cary LaScala Derrick Hostetter Hometown: San Francisco, Oakland, Guam Record Label: Unsigned About: Seeking Empire is a San Francisco rock project featuring bay area musi- cians Nikki Aclaro and Alan Kao (mud) Phil Pristia (Paper Sons/Phantom Kicks) Paul Thomas (Good Charlotte) Cary LaScala (Magic Wands/former live drummer for The Lovemakers/The Limousines) Derrick Hostetter (Cast of Thousands). Currently working on debut album produced by Paul Thomas. featured artists artistprofile 76
  • If you think that R&B needs a fresh face and a new sound, look no further than Bay Area-bred songstress, Michelle Martinez. Since the age of 2, this classically trained vocalist has poised herself as the next big thing, and won’t stop until she is a household name. Her funky, feel-good vibe is inspired by contemporary artists like Alicia Keys, Keri Hilson and Rihanna, who continue to push the envelope in Pop music, while classic R&B art- ists such as Brian McKnight and Mariah Carey give her a fundamental appreciation for romantic balladeers. “I have a fun and sassy personality and I play that up in my songs,” she explains. “But I also can tap into my inner feelings and try to bring out the emotion on slower tempo songs.” After winning numerous singing competitions in the Bay Area, Midwest and Canada, she landed a spot on the WB Network’s “Live in Hollywood” and won during Amateur Night. Surely the years of singing experience couldn’t hurt, as the young singer used the momentum of the win to start working on her demo with established produc- ers such as Traxamillion, Charles Williams, and Smash Hitta. When she finally turned 21, she started performing at various musical venues around the Bay Area, and later opened for Colby O’Donis and Donnie of MTV’s “Making michellemartinezThe Band”. But it wasn’t until she started record- ing herself on YouTube that she started gaining international recognition, with over 55,000 subscrib- ers and over 3 million views and counting. It was because of her viral videos that Avex Music Group in Japan sent an invitation to live and train there for 3 months, which she happily accepted. With the release of her highly anticipated album “Adrenaline” and working with artists like Clyde Carson and the music video set to also release by the end of summer, she is ready to establish herself after years of dreaming about superstardom. Though her success so far has come at a young age, she’s ready to grow and incorporate her ap- preciation for music into her blossoming career. “I’d love people to know that my music is a good sense of who I am,” she shares. “I’m a complex person and have a multi-faceted personality and that’s why my music comes from so many different angles.” featured artists 98
  • Patrick “Murasaki” Orara was born on September 19th 1981 to a mother who was an avid pop music listener, and to a father who was an aspiring rock songwriter. At the age of 3 Murasaki memorized, Stevie Wonder’s “I just called to say I love you”. The particular tempo and vocal syncopation served as the foundation of what was to come as Murasaki’s personal style. During his youth, Patrick was introduced to the golden era Hip-Hop and Rock. As a youth, one of his particular hob- bies was to master reciting his favorite raps from Wu Tang Clan, Hieroglyphics, Bone Thugs and Harmony. In his teenage years, Murasaki found himself im- mersed in the world of rap battling. He challenged himself to battle in the halls of his high school, on air over the weekly radio rap contests, and any- where else an opportunity to showcase his talents presented itself. In 2003, Murasaki released his first mix tape, dubbed “Welcome to the Boonies Vol. One”. A year later, more mix tapes would follow including “Vol. 2” and “The Mix tape from nowhere”, where he shifted his lyrical direction from rap into songwriting. In 2006, Murasaki moved to San Francisco, the new atmosphere inspired Murasaki; wherein the likes of Lupe Fiasco, MGMT, and even foreign genre such as J-pop, and K-pop served as a major influence. During this time, Murasaki started to write for other rappers, singers, and rock bands. In fall 2009, just as the mixtape “The Purple Tape” finished, Murasaki and William “Loky” WJ met in a music marketing class at SFSU and became close friends and business associates. And from there Loky and Murasaki understood that they shared the same life-long dreams of making music-- and thus the innovative and talented songwriting part- nership of Mind Harmony Productions was begun. Soon after meeting up, Bonnie Wong, a Interna- tional Business student and aspiring singer at San Francisco State University. joined their group and there they formed 3:One. Since then they have been collaborating on creating innovative electronic and pop songs. ONE3 patrickmurasaki bonniewong featured artists 1110
  • April Chase is an alternative rock band from San Jose, California. While blending pop & rock influ- ences (Paramore, Phoenix, My American Heart) with honest melodramatic lyrics, April Chase has set out to perfect their craft in pursuing a seri- ous path within the music industry. Playing along such acts as The Higher (Epitaph Records), Story Of The Year (Epitaph Records), and over 60 shows in the last year, these are just humble beginnings for what is to come for this up and coming band. While band members are at an average age of 20 years old, they have managed to release their first self-produced EP “In The Midst Of Sirens” on January 9th, 2010 in Cupertino, CA. Support- ing My American Heart (Warcon Records) in their last bay area show & AJ Rafael (Youtube Sensa- tion), the concert completely sold out through pre-sale tickets and door admissions. Since their first EP has been released, April Chase has gone on to shooting their first music video with Marco Bercasio (Mary J. Blige, Rihanna, E-40 & more) for the first song off of their new CD named “Turn It Down”. With Carina Valdes on vocals, Tim Fergu- son and Mark Sahagun on guitar, Brian Walker on bass, and Lachlan Franckx on drums, April Chase strives to set themselves apart both as musicians and as people. If this band continues to progress at this pace strictly under self motivation, it will be phenomenal to see what the future holds for these dedicated musicians.“April Chases introspective indie-rock melodies crescendo into dramatic cli- maxes. Were thrilled that this up and coming band is rocking at LCL. If April Chase is an indication of the up and coming sound rising in San Jose, were in for headphone-shaking years to come.” -Annie Hermes,Left Coast Live April Chase featured artists 1312
  • Don’t follow your dreams, lead them. LilCrazed 1514
  • Event Information Host: SFSU Korean Student Association Where: San Francisco State University 1600 Holloway Avenue, Jack Adams Hall When: April 22, 2011 6pm - 9pm Performances By Jamaesori (Korean Drumming) | David So (comedian) | Sarah Kim and Co (singers) | CAL Berkeley Martial Arts (TKD) | Mark Agustin (rapper) | Lauren and Monique (sing- ers) | KariSmA (dance crew) The Korean Student Association at San Francisco State University hosted their second annual sold out Korean Cultural Night event showcasing various Korean-American talent from all along the Bay Area. They featured cultural performances from traditional Korean drumming and Taekwondo to a more modern take on KPop-inspired danc- ing, as well as funny guy and Youtube sensation, David So, and we can’t forget -- the amazing music. The show started off in the thoughts of an individual and carried out as a play, which ended with a romance story between two individuals. Jamaesori, a type of Korean drumming plays an impor- tant part in traditional Korean music, ranging from folk music to royal court music. There are a wide variety of shapes and sizes, for use both in accompanying other instruments and in special drumming performances. In the traditional Korean classification of instruments, drums are grouped with the hyeokbu, or instruments made with leather. Talented and local Bay Area singers, Sarah Kim, Lauren, and Monique graced us with their renditions of Korean pop songs and original music. They were full of energy and captivated the audience with their amazing vocals and song choices, drawing the crowd in even more. If interest- ed, please check out their Youtube pages to watch more of their performances. KSA’s very own members started a dance group in 2010 and have come back around for another year to perform in KCN. They put a creative spin on popular K-Pop dancers and leave us with something mesmerizing to watch. event spotlight 1716 Korean Cultural Night
  • event spotlight David So has been a local Stand up Comedian in the city of Sacramento since 2008. He has performed in various comedy clubs throughout California and has made a name for himself through his comedic imper- sonation and stories. He had gained instant popularity after creating a video response to Alexandra Wallace’s “Asians in the Library” video rant. Wallace made many remarks about the Asian community at UCLA that offended many Asian Americans. This video instantly went viral and even reached an international audience. David So used this as a chance to voice his opinion about this matter, but at the same time, add some comedic relief to a touchy subject. As with music, many Asian Americans find it hard to step foot into that field as well. They aren’t normally seen as “funny guys” because of the stereotype of being serious and educationally driven all the time. Events such as these allow people to be exposed to the various and unlim- ited talent that they seldom see. meet david so 1918
  • WHAT DOYOU AIM FOR?
  • CONCLUSION Design Execution, Process, and Solution Assessment: Reaching the end of my research project, it has been interesting to see the amount of research, evolution, and transformation that have occurred throughout the past few months. Starting off with my problem and purpose statement, “Asian American music artists lack media exposure and have difficulty standing out in the mainstream music industry. This study was done to design a product showcasing Asian American music artists in a positive and empowering light – breaking preconceived stereotypes and adding diversity to the current music industry.” My final design solution to this problem was to create a magazine that caters to the Asian American community, especially to the youth. The project started out focusing on independent music labels and their lack of exposure, but upon speaking and analyzing to the people within the production I was working with, I started to see a new problem emerging. In between music production and breaks, the music artists would relax and talk about whatever is on their mind. I noticed that for the most part, the conversations would revolve around how difficult it is as an Asian American to break into the music scene. They have to work twice as hard for half the recognition and exposure. Since I’ve been extremely active in the Asian American community throughout my time in college, I can under- stand where they were coming from and a general understanding of the situation. I consulted with Chair of the Asian American Studies Department at SF State, Lorraine Dong, and Asian American Studies Professor, Valerie Soe, to gain a more in depth idea about the issues affecting Asian Americans trying to break through in the enter- tainment industry. I researched a vast amount of academic journals, writings, and news articles analyzing current and historical trends in the music industry. Through extensive research, surveys, and interviews with music art- ists and college students alike, I was able to conclude the misrepresentation and under representation of Asian Americans in the media, especially in the music scene. My magazine serves as a platform and outlet for Asian American youth to find role models as well as spotlighting new talented music artists. This project allowed me to work on various projects to create one whole piece. I did photoshoots and interviews with aspiring musicians, attended music events, as well as did the write up for the article pieces. Understanding the anatomy of a magazine was the fundamental thing to grasp. The layout, grid structure, placement of images, and typography utilizes all of the skills I have learned throughout my time in DAI. It was reward- ing because it enabled me to work on a solution to a problem I have a passion for. This magazine embraces a dynamic, rock, pop, hip-hop, and empowering mood and feel. The color choices reso- nate more with the type of music and events featured throughout the magazine. Since it is for primarily teenagers and young adults, I chose colors that are fun and eclectic. There is a heavy usage of black, which goes with the idea of night time events where these artists are playing at. The typefaces used throughtout are Gill Sans and Helvetica, which are simple, modern, and clean. To gauge the effectiveness of my magazine, I tested it out on many people as well as placed it in an environment where it would be sold. The magazine was well-received and based on the pictures displayed above, we are able to see it in a natural setting, blending in as well as sticking out from the crowd -- which was part of the goal for this project. Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 69 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 68
  • DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION: College students perusing and critiquing the magazine Example of AIM magazine on the magazine shelf in Borders Bookstore Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 71 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 70
  • Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 73 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 72
  • Behind the Scenes Pictures: James Lontayao, member of Lexationships Kenta Naoi, Spoken Word Artist Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 76 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 74 April Chase, Indie-Rock Band Carina Valdes, band member of April Chase
  • Sorah Yang, Singer Jeff Bernat, R&B singer Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 77 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 76 Garyan Wong, Chinese Harp musician APT, Dance Group
  • Lil Crazed, Rapper Manny Garcia, Singer and songwriter Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 79 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 78 Bonnie Wong, Singer
  • Patrick “Murasaki” Orara & William WJ, Mind Harmony Productions Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 81 Nina Chan | Culminating Experience: Research & Development | Asian Americans in Music 80 Racist and stereotypical portrayals of Asian Americans
  • Works Cited: “Far East Movement Goes Platinum.” Earth Walkers. Web. <http://www.earthwalkersmag.com/ music-/431-congrats-fareast-movement-goes-platinum-first-asian-american-group-to-break- into-the-itunes-and-billboard-top-10-chart>. “Stil Waiting for Asian Americans in Music.” Fusion Magazine, 30 Oct. 2010. <http://www.fusionmagazine.org/2009/10/30/still-waiting-asian-americans-in-music/> Chang, Theodora. “Moving Education Beyond the Model Minority Myth.” Center for American Progress. Center for American Progress, 12 May 2011. Web. 14 May 2011. <http://www. americanprogress.org/issues/2011/05/apia_student_needs.html> Cong, Steven. “Northwest Asian Weekly | Hip Hop Dreams: Asian Americans Artists on the Difficulties They Face Breaking out into Mainstream Rap | .” Northwest Asian Weekly. Asian Weekly, 13 May 2010. Web. <http://www.nwasianweekly.com/2010/05/hip-hop-dreams-asian- americans-artists-on-the-difficulties-they-face-breaking-out-into-mainstream-rap/>. Kun, Josh. “Unexpected Harmony.” The New York Times - Music. 18 June 2010. Web. <http:// reportingtexas.com/gates-opening-for-asian-american-entertainers/>. Navarro, Mireya. “Missing: Asian-American Pop Stars - The New York Times.” The New York Times - Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. The New York Times, 4 Mar. 2007. Web. 14 Feb. 2011. <http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/04/world/americas/04iht-singer.4787848.html>. Sun, Jasmin. “Doors Open for Asian American Entertainer.” Reporting Texas. 26 Jan. 2011. Web. <http://reportingtexas.com/gates-opening-for-asian-american-entertainers/>. Takaki, Ronald T. Strangers from a Different Shore: a History of Asian Americans. Boston: Little, Brown, 1989. Print. Photo Credits: Seeking Empire photos courtesy of: Eric Tagan Hooten and AJPopFilms Michelle Martinez photos courtesy of: Michelle Martinez